Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)

Pharmacy

Program

Procedure for Admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

South University School of Pharmacy will accept only applications that are submitted through PharmCAS at: 
www.pharmcas.org.

Admission Cycle 

Students are accepted into the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program once each June.

General Admission

For optimum consideration during an admissions cycle, prospective students are encouraged to submit a completed application to PharmCAS as early as possible. Direct applications to South University will not be 
processed.  Admission to the program is competitive and will be granted on a rolling basis for applications postmarked no later than March 1 of each year.

Admission Criteria

Consideration for admission will be based on the applicant's potential for academic and professional achievement and an assessment of written and verbal communication skills, critical thinking skills, integrity, dedication, motivation, character and maturity. To be considered for admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program a prospective student must: 

1. Complete or be in the process of completing a minimum of two years of pre-pharmacy course requirements (60 semester hours) at an acceptable accredited collegiate institution. The student must earn a grade of C
(2.0) or better in each prerequisite course. All pre-pharmacy coursework presented in the table below must be completed before matriculation to Doctor of Pharmacy degree program on or before May 25th of the program entrance year.

Pre-pharmacy Requirements* 

English Composition/English Literature 
3 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 4.5-qtr. hrs.)

Arts & Humanities/Social & Behavioral Sciences
12 sem. hrs. (4 sem. or 18 qtr. hrs.)

Biology Ic 
4 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 6 qtr. hrs.)

General Chemistry I
4 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 6 qtr. hrs.)

General Chemistry II
4 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 6 qtr. hrs.)

Organic Chemistry I
4 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 6 qtr. hrs.)

Organic Chemistry II
4 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 6 qtr. hrs.)

Human Anatomy/Physiology Ie, f 
3 sem hrs. (1 sem or 4.5 qtr. hrs.)

Human Anatomy/Physiology IIe, f 
3 sem hrs. (1 sem or 4.5 qtr. hrs.)

College Algebra or higherd 
3 sem. hrs. (1 sem. or 5 qtr. hrs.) 

Other Math and Science Coursese
16 sem. hrs. (5 sem. or 24 qtr. hrs.) 

  1. Recommended courses in these disciplines include psychology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, history, literature, art, music, theater, drama, business, education, government, and foreign languages.
  2. General Biology II, Botany, Zoology, or similar health-foundational biology are also acceptable. These courses must include a laboratory. Applicants with an undergraduate degree or higher in biological science are exempted from Biology I and II pre-requisite requirements.
  3. These courses must include laboratory. Applicants with an undergraduate degree or higher in Chemistry are exempted from Chemistry I and II pre-requisite requirements.
  4. Calculus preferred.
  5. Preferred courses: Microbiology, Statistic, Genetics, Cell Biology, Immunology, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, or Physics.

Notes:It is recommended that the student take two science courses and at least five courses (a minimum of 17 semester hours of credit) each semester to ensure appropriate preparation for the academic challenge of the School of Pharmacy.

Course substitutions may be considered at the discretion of the Assistant Dean for Admissions of the School of Pharmacy.  

  1. Earn a recommended cumulative grade point average of 2.80 (minimum 2.50) on a 4.0 scale. (A science GPA of 3.0 or better is recommended.)
  2. Submit a completed Pharmacy application through www.pharmcas.org. Applications mailed directly to South University will not be accepted.
  3. Submit a minimum of two letters of recommendation directly to PharmCas; however, three letters are preferred.
  4. Demonstrate the oral and written communication skills required to interact with patients and professional colleagues, and expected of a professional doctoral level student.
  5. Complete the South University School of Pharmacy's on campus personal interview with members of the Faculty and the Admissions Committee (by invitation only).
  6. Provide directly to PharmCAS all transcripts. Transcripts for all college coursework must be submitted since academic performance for all college coursework undertaken by the student will be evaluated.
  7. Applicants for whom English is a Second Language must submit to Pharm CAS a minimum paper-based TOEFL score of 550 or the electronic-based score of 79-80 to be considered for the program or completes (with a passing grade in all courses) a minimum of two (2) academic terms at a regionally or nationally accredited U.S. post-secondary institution in which instruction is delivered primarily in English.
  8. International students with a current F1 Visa are eligible to apply for admission. It is preferred to have completed 30 semester hours at a regionally accredited college/university in the United States. Required pre-requisite Course work completed at international (non-US) institutions is accepted if it meets the admission requirements. Applicants who have attended international institutions must order a foreign transcript evaluation from World Education Services (WES) through the PharmCAS application. The evaluation report must include institution information, course tile, credit hours, and grades. Credit will be given only for applicable courses that can be used to fulfill prerequisites, and they may be required to completed additional courses prior to enrollment in order to fulfill any remaining prerequisites.

Exceptions to the Minimum CGPA

Applicants with CGPAs lower than the stated program minimum may be considered for admission with significant evidence of academic and professional potential demonstrated by the career and/or personal accomplishments indicated in the career résumé (including a personal statement of academic and professional goals), and academic or professional letters of recommendation. Exceptions must be recommended by the School of Pharmacy Assistant Dean for Admissions, Chair of the Admissions Committee, or School Dean.

Technical Standards for Doctor of Pharmacy Degree Program Admission

The educational mission of the South University School of Pharmacy is to prepare pharmacists for life-long learning in the practice of collaborative patient-centered care, and promote excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. 

Students admitted to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program must also meet the technical standards for admissions. These technical standards outline the essential functions that candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be able to perform. These essential functions reside in the following categories: Observation, Communication, 
Sensory/Motor, Intellectual, and Behavior/Social. However, it is recognized that degrees of ability vary among individuals. The South University School of Pharmacy is committed to supporting its students by any reasonable means to complete the course of study leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. 

  • Observation: A candidate must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences, including, but not limited to, physiological and pharmacological demonstrations in animals, evaluation of microbiological cultures, and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathological states. A candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. In detail, observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision and other sensory modalities.
  • Communication: A candidate must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. The focus of this communication is to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive nonverbal communication. Communication includes speech, reading, writing, and computer literacy. A candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written forms with all members of the healthcare team in a timely manner.
  • Sensory/Motor: A candidate must have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by physically touching patients, e.g. assessing range of motion of a joint, taking blood pressure readings, taking a pulse reading. A candidate must be able to execute motor movements to provide general care and emergency treatments to patients, e.g. first aid treatments, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A candidate must be able to execute motor movements required in the compounding of medications inclusive of using techniques for preparing sterile solutions, e.g., parenteral or ophthalmic solutions. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.
  • Intellectual (Conceptual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities): A candidate must have the ability to measure, calculate, reason, and analyze. A candidate must be able to synthesize and apply complex information in a timely manner. A candidate must be fully alert and attentive at all times in clinical settings.
  • Behavioral/Social Attributes: A candidate must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his or her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the interaction with patients. A candidate must possess the ability to develop mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients. A candidate must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. A candidate must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. A candidate must possess compassion, integrity, interpersonal skills, and motivation to excel in pharmacy practice.

Requirements for Matriculation Applicants who have been accepted into the Doctor of Pharmacy program must fulfill the following before they can officially enter the program: 

  • Remit the $500 acceptance fee by the date designated in the acceptance agreement. The entire acceptance fee is credited to the first quarter's tuition.
  • Submit a college transcript after each term completed following acceptance.
  • Submit self-certification of high school graduation or GED completion.
  • Submit proof of immunization or for immunity to Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR), Varicella (Chickenpox), Tetanus/Diphtheria, and Hepatitis B. In addition, students must complete the annual Tuberculin Test (PPD). An Immunization Clearance Form provided as part of the acceptance package must be completed and returned along with other immunization documentation.
  • Present a Basic Adult Life Support certificate.
  • Submit proof of medical insurance coverage.
  • Satisfactorily complete a Background check.

Complete additional coursework if required by the Admissions Committee and submit additional documents as requested by the Office of Admissions.

Failure to comply with these requirements may result in forfeiture of your acceptance.

Laptop Computer Requirement

Laptop computers are required for use in the multimedia classroom. All students are required to have a laptop computer with Internet access and CD Rom which meets university specifications. Purchase of a new laptop is not recommended until just before matriculation into the program so that performance vs. cost can be optimized. Students may buy any laptop that meets the minimum computer specifications which are set by the school in the spring of each year.

For additional admissions information please see the admissions section here

Accelerated Program

One of only a limited number of accelerated Doctor of Pharmacy Degree programs nationwide through full-time continuous enrollment, South University provides four academic years of study within three calendar years. After being accepted to the South University School of Pharmacy, students begin a 12-quarter schedule.

Curriculum 

The carefully structured curriculum is designed to prepare graduates for high standards of contemporary pharmacy practice as well as the evolution of the profession.

Teaching Method 

In a setting of collaborative learning and teamwork, the program interrelates the basic sciences and practice.

Technology and Facilities

The South University School of Pharmacy offers personalized and technical instructional delivery utilizing industry-standard equipment and facilities.

The role of pharmacists in the medical field is changing and evolving to meet the demands of the profession and society. The Doctor of Pharmacy degree program's curriculum at South University is structured to produce graduates who can adapt to the profession's changes while also maintaining high standards of pharmacy practice. South University's progressive curriculum is designed to incorporate technology in addition to a traditional classroom setting.

South University Campus and Affiliations with Healthcare Facilities 

The South University School of Pharmacy in Savannah is a 40,000-square-foot, freestanding, facility designed specifically to house a modern pharmacy school. The building provides instructional, laboratory, and office facilities for pharmacy students, faculty and administrators. This facility also provides two large modern lecture halls and an adequate number of small classrooms to facilitate small group instruction.

A General Purpose Laboratory is located in the building. This laboratory includes rooms for patient counseling practice and teaching physical assessment. All rooms have videotape/playback capabilities. In addition, a sterile products room and a model pharmacy are available. This practice laboratory accommodates up to 34 students per class, and is designed to emulate real practice settings as well as to provide maximum use in the academic program. There is also a 32-station Analytical Chemistry Laboratory that is used for chemistry, pharmaceutics, and professional laboratory courses. A Drug Information Center on the first floor provides an active learning center in the School of Pharmacy.

Practice sites have been recruited to support the experiential component of the curriculum. Early activity will be focused on the introductory practice experiences. Students will be precepted at sites in all three phases of practice experience: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Experiential sites will include, but not be limited to, chain and independent community pharmacies, teaching and community hospitals, long term care facilities, managed care facilities, pharmaceutical companies, home infusion therapy companies, regulatory agencies, family practice clinics and a veterinary hospital, among others.

South University has developed a program that is visionary in its approach to educating Pharmacy students, with a carefully structured curriculum designed to prepare graduates for both high standards of contemporary pharmacy practice and the evolution of the profession. At South University, we have integrated Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics into one combined continuing course sequence developed in full collaboration by science and practice faculty. The resulting efficiency allows a rigorous comprehensive didactic component in a curriculum that contains 12 months of full-time rotations using an accelerated, full-time 12-quarter schedule designed to deliver four academic years in three calendar years.

Program Student Learning Outcomes:

Domain 1: Foundational Knowledge 

1.1. Apply principles of chemistry, biochemistry, and pharmacology to medication safety and efficacy.

1.2. Apply the principles of pharmaceutical science and calculations to drug design and drug delivery systems.

1.3. Apply pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacogenomic principles to therapeutic strategies.

1.4. Compare and contrast the physiology and biochemistry of normal body system function to that of abnormal function.

1.5. Critically analyze literature related to drugs and diseases to enhance clinical decision-making.

Domain 2: Essentials for Practice and Care

2.1. Collect subjective and objective patient information to identify medication and medical-related problems.

2.2. Assess and analyze information to determine effectiveness of therapy, identify problems, and prioritize needs to achieve optimal patient care.

2.3. Design an individual patient-centered care plan in collaboration with the patient and other health care professionals that is evidence-based and cost-effective to maximize desired effects.

2.4. Implement the care plan in collaboration with the patient, caregiver, and other healthcare professionals.

2.5. Follow-up and monitor the care plan to evaluate its effectiveness and modify the plan as needed.

Domain 3: Approach to Practice and Care of Individual Patients

3.1 Demonstrate accurate, safe, and time-sensitive preparation, dispensing, and administration of pharmaceuticals.

3.2 Manage pharmacy resources to optimize pharmacotherapy outcomes for individual patients.

3.3 Educate patients and health care providers.

Domain 4: Approach to Practice and Care of Populations

4.1 Demonstrate skills needed to participate in, or provide, preventive services.

4.2 Apply research processes to ensure informed decision-making.

Personal and Professional Development

5.1 Examine personal attributes that may enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

5.2 Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of organizational position.

5.3 Engage in innovative and creative methods to accomplish goals.

5.4 Demonstrate professional citizenship in the delivery of patient care, distribution of medications, and the promotion of wellness and disease prevention.

5.5 Advocate for the profession and patients.

5.6 Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

5.7 Demonstrate problem solving skills including the ability to think critically, exercise professional judgment, and articulate and defend a decision.

5.8 Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust bestowed to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.

5.9 Demonstrate knowledge of, and compliance with, federal and state laws/regulations governing the practice of pharmacy.

Create Value for Stakeholders of the Health Care System

6.1 Demonstrate the ability to create a business plan and/or strategy to launch a new service, product, or business line or improve an existing one.

6.2 Demonstrate the ability to apply performance improvement strategies to monitor the quality of a service, product, or business.

6.3 Demonstrate the ability to apply business and financial management tools to monitor the performance of a service, product, or business.

Doctor of Pharmacy Degree Program Curriculum and Courses: 219 Credits

1st Quarter (Summer Quarter) 15 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This is the first of a two course sequence designed to explore the mechanisms of disease and tissue injury to organs and organ systems during selected pathophysiologic states with the goal of providing students with a rationale for drug therapy. Patient cases will be reviewed from a pharmacist's perspective.

Credits : 5

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This course introduces the mathematical processes and computations essential to the practice of pharmacy. Emphasis will be placed upon development of fundamental calculation skills necessary in subsequent curricular courses and in professional practice.

Credits : 3

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This course reinforces biochemistry with a review of drug chemistry and resultant biological events. Discussion focuses on biologically active compounds and cover base structures, parent compounds, metabolites, and structure modifications for altered therapeutic effects.

Credits : 3

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In this course, Doctor of Pharmacy students will apply concepts and demonstrate pharmacy skills and techniques necessary for competent pharmacy practice. Students are expected to apply problem solving skills and critical thinking in independent and team-based settings.

Credits : 1

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This course is designed to introduce students to the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and abilities to prepare students for the profession of pharmacy. This course also introduces students to effective communication strategies for use with patients, healthcare professionals, and other professional encounters. Students will learn to apply and integrate effective mode(s) of communication (verbal, nonverbal, written) and demonstrate that they have mastered effective communication skills.

Credits : 3

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Sub-Total Credits
15

2nd Quarter (Fall Quarter) 16 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course is the second of a two course sequence designed to explore the mechanisms of disease and tissue injury to organs and organ systems during selected pathophysiologic states with the goal of providing students with a rationale for drug therapy. Patient cases will be reviewed from a pharmacist's perspective.

Credits : 4

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This course is focused on fundamentals of vitamins, enzymes, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids as applied to biomedical sciences. This course will provide an understanding of the biochemical processes of these biomolecules and their clinical significance to the practice of pharmacy.

Credits : 4

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The course will cover a historical perspective of the evolution of modern dosage forms, governing laws, basic fundamentals of physical pharmacy, pharmacokinetic principles, and topics pertinent to the design, production, and stability of drugs and dosage forms. Lectures will focus on the rationale for design, intended performance characteristics, and the proper use of dosage forms to optimize clinical outcomes.

Credits : 3

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This course examines historical and current healthcare delivery in the United States. Discussion includes interprofessional collaborations within various practice settings as well as social, organizational, and financial aspects of providing patient care.

Credits : 2

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The introductory community pharmacy practice I, II, and III rotations are designed to expose the student to a variety of patient care services in the community pharmacy practice site. The goal of the rotation is to expose the student to integrate basic pharmacy related concepts to patient care as an independent practitioner in an outpatient pharmacy setting. The primary focus should be on distributive functions but should include at an introductory level direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
16

3rd Quarter (Winter Quarter) 19 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course discusses bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections known to be pathogenic in humans in addition to the immune system's response to these foreign organisms. The processes of microbiology and immunology are foundational for treating infectious diseases in patients.

Credits : 5

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The course will cover how the blueprints for cells and organisms are contained in the structure of molecules like DNA, RNA, and protein. Examples of minor structural changes in DNA (mutations) and their biochemical, pathological and health consequences are presented as well as how this information can be used in disease diagnosis and drug discovery. Disease states due to alterations in the proper function of DNA and RNA will be discussed throughout the course. Molecular mechanisms in place to maintain adequate cell number and control cell growth will also be covered.

Credits : 3

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This course will explore the foundational principles of pharmacodynamics and biopharmaceutics. Students will apply the concepts of drug-receptor interactions, drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and pharmacogenomics to predict drug activity/efficacy, drug interactions, and adverse effects for the rational treatment of disease as a pharmacist.

Credits : 4

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This course is designed to provide didactic framework for the therapeutic management of numerous, common, self-limiting diseases that can be treated with nonprescription medications. Students will be assessed on their ability to make appropriate, rational recommendations to patients requesting assistance with self-care and nonprescription therapy.

Credits : 2

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This course will cover the theoretical and practical topics involved in the design, production, stability and performance of dosage forms. The particular strengths and weaknesses of common dosage forms and their proper utilization will be emphasized.

Credits : 2

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The introductory community pharmacy practice I, II, and III rotations are designed to expose the student to a variety of patient care services in the community pharmacy practice site. The goal of the rotation is to expose the student to integrate basic pharmacy related concepts to patient care as an independent practitioner in an outpatient pharmacy setting. The primary focus should be on distributive functions but should include at an introductory level direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
19

4th Quarter (Spring Quarter) 18 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course introduces the conceptual and mathematical expressions of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion processes. Students will derive pharmacokinetic parameters to calculate dosages by various routes of administration to achieve plasma drug concentrations within therapeutic range.

Credits : 4

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This course is designed to familiarize the student with the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system. It is a continuum of the Integrated Sequence of Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology and Therapeutics with an emphasis on specific therapeutic classes and chemical subclasses of drugs, their relationships to drug structure and activity in regards to the dynamics of disposition, metabolism, and both primary and secondary receptor interactions. Students will learn how to formulate a complete therapeutic plan which includes identifying goals for therapy, choosing the appropriate medication and dose based on drug and patient variables, and developing suitable monitoring parameters.

Credits : 3.5

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Students will study the molecular basis and drug designs to combat inflammation. Patient Cases and the drug classes covered are: Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs), Opioid and Non-Opioid Analgesics, and Glucocorticoids, along with therapeutic approaches and patient care to Asthma, COPD, Gout, Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Credits : 2.5

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This course is designed to provide didactic framework for the therapeutic management of numerous, common, self-limiting diseases that can be treated with nonprescription medications. Students will be assessed on their ability to make appropriate, rational recommendations to patients requesting assistance with self-care and nonprescription therapy.

Credits : 3

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In this course, Doctor of Pharmacy students will apply concepts and demonstrate pharmacy skills and techniques necessary for competent pharmacy practice. Students are expected to apply problem solving skills and critical thinking in independent and team-based settings

Credits : 1

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This course engages students in a review of material presented throughout the curriculum using the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Students are expected to solve disease-state and medication related problems, develop patient care plans, and defend proposed recommendations. Students will be expected to develop, and ultimately master, effective written and verbal communication skills by the conclusion of the course sequence.

Credits : 1

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The introductory community pharmacy practice I, II, and III rotations are designed to expose the student to a variety of patient care services in the community pharmacy practice site. The goal of the rotation is to expose the student to integrate basic pharmacy related concepts to patient care as an independent practitioner in an outpatient pharmacy setting. The primary focus should be on distributive functions but should include at an introductory level direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
18

5th Quarter (Summer Quarter) 16 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
The introductory community pharmacy practice rotation is designed to expose the student to a variety of patient care services in the community pharmacy practice site. The goal of the rotation is to teach the student to integrate basic pharmacy related concepts to patient care as an independent practitioner in an outpatient pharmacy setting. The primary focus should be on distributive functions but should include at an introductory level direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management.

Credits : 8

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The introductory institution pharmacy practice rotation is designed to expose the student to the inpatient drug distribution facility of a hospital or other institutional health care setting. The goal of the rotation is to teach the student to integrate basic pharmacy related concepts to pharmacy practice in the inpatient setting and to provide a basic understanding of how distributive, clinical, and administrative aspects of pharmacy practice are intertwined.

Credits : 8

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Sub-Total Credits
16

6th Quarter (Fall Quarter) 18 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course utilizes patient demographics, drug interactions, disease states and conditions (erratic absorption, organ dysfunction, obesity, pregnancy) in pharmacokinetic models to carry out patient-specific dosage calculations of drugs with a narrow therapeutic index in order to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity.

Credits : 3

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This course is a continuum of Integrated Sequences I - II with an emphasis on the Autonomic Nervous System. The course is devoted to discussing the pharmacological treatment, dosing, and monitoring of autonomic nervous system therapeutic agents. The course will provide students with the information that they need to develop rational therapeutic recommendations to various healthcare providers and patients.

Credits : 4.5

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This course is designed to familiarize the student with the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs. It is a continuum of the Integrated Sequence of Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology and Therapeutics with an emphasis on specific therapeutic classes and chemical subclasses of drugs, their relationships to drug structure and activity in regards to the dynamics of disposition, metabolism, and both primary and secondary receptor interactions. Students will learn how to formulate a complete therapeutic plan which includes identifying goals for therapy, choosing the appropriate medication and dose based on drug and patient variables, and developing suitable monitoring parameters.

Credits : 2.5

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This course engages students in a review of material presented throughout the curriculum using the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Students are expected to solve disease-state and medication related problems, develop patient care plans, and defend proposed recommendations. Students will be expected to develop, and ultimately master, effective written and verbal communication skills by the conclusion of the course sequence.

Credits : 1

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3
Sub-Total Credits
18

7th Quarter (Winter Quarter) 16 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course engages students in drug information and literature retrieval, interpretation, and application to clinical practice including communication of findings to patients, healthcare professionals, and regulatory organizations. These skill sets assist pharmacists with conducting practice activities that promote optimal health outcomes while minimizing/avoiding adverse events.

Credits : 3

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This course engages students in a review of material presented throughout the curriculum using the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Students are expected to solve disease-state and medication related problems, develop patient care plans, and defend proposed recommendations. Students will be expected to develop, and ultimately master, effective written and verbal communication skills by the conclusion of the course sequence.

Credits : 1

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This course is designed to introduce students to the essentials of pharmacy practice management. Human resource management principles and issues, accounting principles, and financial analytical techniques will be covered. Selected issues relevant to community and health-systems pharmacy will be covered through lectures and case studies. A major focus of the course is to understand and appy a variety of managerial principles and functions to directing, supervising, and developing pharmacy operations and services.

Credits : 3

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This course is designed to familiarize the student with the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. It is a continuum of the Integrated Sequence of Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology and Therapeutics with an emphasis on specific therapeutic classes and chemical subclasses of drugs, their relationships to drug structure and activity in regards to the dynamics of disposition, metabolism, and both primary and secondary receptor interactions. Students will learn how to formulate a complete therapeutic plan which includes identifying goals for therapy, choosing the appropriate medication and dose based on drug and patient variables, and developing suitable monitoring parameters.

Credits : 6.5

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This course is a continuum of the Integrated Sequences. The focus is on the interrelationships to pathophysiology of renal diseases, and their clinical significance to therapeutic monitoring and decision making. Since there is overlap in medications used in both renal and cardiology systems, pharmacology and medicinal chemistry concepts covered in the Cardiology Integrated Sequence will be applied, but not specifically covered in this course. An emphasis on specific therapeutic classes and chemical subclasses of drugs, their relationships to drug structure and activity in regards to the dynamics of disposition, metabolism, and both primary and secondary receptor interactions is covered when it has not been addressed in the Cardiology Integrated Sequence.

Credits : 2.5

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Sub-Total Credits
16

8th Quarter (Spring Quarter) 18.5 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course engages students in a review of material presented throughout the curriculum using the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Students are expected to solve disease-state and medication related problems, develop patient care plans, and defend proposed recommendations. Students will be expected to develop, and ultimately master, effective written and verbal communication skills by the conclusion of the course sequence.

Credits : 1

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This course is part of a pharmacy capstone series and engages students in a review of disease state management using the pharmacist patient care process. Additionally, collaboration, communication, and documentation are included as part of delivering patient-centered care.

Credits : 4

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This course is a continuum of the Integrated Sequence modules with an emphasis on the central nervous system. The course is devoted to discussing specific therapeutic classes and chemical subclasses of drugs, their relationships to drug structure and activity with regard to the dynamics of disposition, metabolism, and both primary and secondary receptor interactions. The course will provide students with the information they need to develop rational therapeutic recommendations and discuss the clinical significance of therapeutic monitoring.

Credits : 5.5

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This course is designed to orient students to antimicrobial principles and pertinent disease -state management strategies through utilization of patient-specific and laboratory generated clinical parameters. Specifically, familiarization with the pharmacology, medicinal chemistry and therapeutic application of antibiotics, antivirals and antifungals will be stressed.

Credits : 5

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3
Sub-Total Credits
18.5

9th Quarter (Summer Quarter) 16 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course will introduce pharmacoeconomic evaluation methods (e.g. cost-minimization, cost- utility, cost-benefit, and cost-effectiveness) as applied to pharmaceutical products and services. Quality of life and health outcomes research will also be explored from a pharmacist's perspective.

Credits : 2

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This course is part of a pharmacy capstone series and engages students in a review of disease state management using the pharmacist patient care process. Additionally, collaboration, communication, and documentation are included as part of delivering patient-centered care.

Credits : 3

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This course engages students in a review of material presented throughout the curriculum using the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Students are expected to solve disease-state and medication related problems, develop patient care plans, and defend proposed recommendations. Students will be expected to develop, and ultimately master, effective written and verbal communication skills by the conclusion of the course sequence.

Credits : 2

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The mission of this course is to continue the Integrated Sequence curriculum with a focus on acute care topics presented from a therapeutics perspective. Emphasis is placed on the clinical pharmacology of the drug and drug classes as related to the pathophysiology of diseases and their clinical significance for therapeutic monitoring. A large portion of the course will be devoted to discussing the clinical management of specialty patient populations. The course will present students with the neccessary evidence to develop rational therapeutic recommendations for patients and various healthcare providers.

Credits : 3.5

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The Hematology/Oncology Integrated Sequence course incorporates the etiology and pathophysiology of major hematologic/oncologic conditions with evidence-based treatment, dosing, monitoring, and management of pharmacologic agents, and supportive care. This course provides a fundamental overview of therapeutic classes of drugs utilized in the hematology/oncology setting with a specific focus on therapeutic mechanisms of actions, ADME, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, and adverse effects. This course will provide students with information essential to developing rational hematology/oncology therapeutic recommendations to healthcare providers and patients.

Credits : 2.5

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3
Sub-Total Credits
16

10th, 11th, and 12th Quarters (Fall/Winter/Spring Quarters) 66.5 Credits

Advanced Professional Practice Experience Rotations*

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course is the first part of a three course sequence and will consist of a self-paced guided review of relevant material covered during the didactic portion of the curriculum in order to assist students in a comprehensive preparation for the North American Pharmacy Licensure Exam (NAPLEX). Students will review assigned video lectures in alignment with topics presented in the textbook based on a pre-set schedule.

Credits : 3.5

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This course is the second part of a three course sequence and will consist of a self-paced guided review of relevant material covered during the didactic portion of the curriculum in order to assist students in a comprehensive preparation for the North American Pharmacy Licensure Exam (NAPLEX). Students will review assigned video lectures in alignment with topics presented in the textbook based on a pre-set schedule.

Credits : 3.5

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This course is the third part of a three course sequence and will consist of a self-paced guided review of relevant material covered during the didactic portion of the curriculum in order to assist students in a comprehensive preparation for the North American Pharmacy Licensure Exam (NAPLEX). Students will review assigned video lectures in alignment with topics presented in the textbook based on a pre-set schedule.

Credits : 3.5

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Advanced community pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the outpatient setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory community pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management while still participating in patient counseling and distributive functions.(minimum 200 contact hours).

Credits : 8

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Ambulatory care experiences provide evidence-based, patient-centered collaborative care in the outpatient setting to meet the medication management needs of patients in the treatment of chronic disease. These pharmacists promote health and wellness, disease prevention and education, and medication management of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease / dyslipidemia, asthma / chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart failure. Other chronic diseases encountered by the ambulatory care pharmacist may include chronic kidney disease, chronic infectious diseases, and other chronic diseases responsive to infusion therapy that do not require hospitalization. Pharmacist delivered ambulatory care occurs in institutional health system-based clinics, community-based clinics, government-funded clinics, and managed care organizations as well as the community pharmacy setting where comparable care is provided, (minimum 200 contact hours).

Credits : 8

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General medicine (acute care) experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to adult inpatients typically located on a general medicine floor. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and practice as an integrated member of the inter-professional health care team. Typical patients present with the following medical problems: cardiac, pulmonary, renal, hepatic, neurologic, gastrointestinal, endocrine and infectious diseases. The experience incorporates all elements of care from medication reconciliation, medication therapy recommendations and monitoring, discharge counseling, and transitions of care, (minimum 200 contact hours).

Credits : 8

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Advanced institutional pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the institutional health-system setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory institutional pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on broad-based operational duties, regulatory compliance, medication procurement, and formulary and personnel management while still participating in distributive functions (e.g. sterile and non-sterile compounding, dispensing technologies).

Credits : 8

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Sub-Total Credits
42.5

Students are required to take three of the following:

Course Code
Title
Credits
Advanced institutional pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the institutional health-system setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory institutional pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on broad-based operational duties, regulatory compliance, medication procurement, and formulary and personnel management while still participating in distributive functions (e.g. sterile and non-sterile compounding, dispensing technologies). Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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Advanced institutional pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the institutional health-system setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory institutional pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on broad-based operational duties, regulatory compliance, medication procurement, and formulary and personnel management while still participating in distributive functions (e.g. sterile and non-sterile compounding, dispensing technologies). Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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Advanced institutional pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the institutional health-system setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory institutional pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on broad-based operational duties, regulatory compliance, medication procurement, and formulary and personnel management while still participating in distributive functions (e.g. sterile and non-sterile compounding, dispensing technologies). Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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Advanced community pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the outpatient setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory community pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management while still participating in patient counseling and distributive functions. Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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Advanced community pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the outpatient setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory community pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management while still participating in patient counseling and distributive functions. Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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Advanced community pharmacy experiences provide comprehensive, evidence-based, individualized, patient-centered care to a diverse population in the outpatient setting. Pharmacists are expected to be accountable for the patient's drug therapy outcomes and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals. This experience is distinguished from introductory community pharmacy experiences through greater emphasis on direct patient care (e.g., administration of immunizations, health-related screenings, self-care, medication therapy management services, and collaborative practice), pharmacy operations management, and personnel management while still participating in patient counseling and distributive functions. Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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An administrative / management / academic non-patient care rotation gives the doctor of pharmacy student an opportunity to acquire first-hand experience in the managerial, administrative, and alternative aspects of pharmacy practice. The experience focuses on the application of management principles in a professional practice setting. The administrative experience can be done at a variety of sites including hospitals, independent and chain community pharmacies, health maintenance organizations, managed care programs, third-party programs, colleges of pharmacy, and manufacturers. To accommodate the needs of the student and best use the resources of the site, the content of the rotation is flexible. It is recognized that each site has its own unique strengths to share with students. At the beginning of the experience, the preceptor and student should jointly select objectives from the attached "menu" below, keeping in mind other practical goals or objectives may also be pursued. It is recommended that approximately four objectives be selected, with about one week devoted to each and allowing for ad hoc experiences to occur. Minimum of 200 contact hours.

Credits : 8

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An administrative / management / academic non-patient care rotation gives the doctor of pharmacy student an opportunity to acquire first-hand experience in the managerial, administrative, and alternative aspects of pharmacy practice. The experience focuses on the application of management principles in a professional practice setting. The administrative experience can be done at a variety of sites including hospitals, independent and chain community pharmacies, health maintenance organizations, managed care programs, third-party programs, colleges of pharmacy, and manufacturers. To accommodate the needs of the student and best use the resources of the site, the content of the rotation is flexible. It is recognized that each site has its own unique strengths to share with students. At the beginning of the experience, the preceptor and student should jointly select objectives from the attached "menu" below, keeping in mind other practical goals or objectives may also be pursued. It is recommended that approximately four objectives be selected, with about one week devoted to each and allowing for ad hoc experiences to occur. (Minimum 200 contact hours).

Credits : 8

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The South University Advance Drug Information Pharmacy Practice Experience is offered to pharmacy students in their final professional year of training and provides students with exposure to both healthcare professional and consumer medication inquires (e.g., telephone and email correspondence). Students strengthen their background questioning and search strategy in order to provide appropriate and timely responses. References and databases are presented and discussed routinely in order to familiarize students with its content and organization. Additionally, several written assignments (e.g., newsletter article, drug monograph/class review), verbal presentations (e.g., journal club, case presentations, topic of interest), projects (e.g., Medicare Part D/MTM workshops, MUE/DUE) and discussion topics are incorporated into the rotation experience. Team interaction is emphasized in order to coordinate the delivery of quality, comprehensive patient care.

Credits : 8

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Sub-Total Credits
24

One additional elective is available and will add one credit to the program for a total of 220 credit hours.

Course Code
Title
Credits
A administrative / management / academic non-patient care rotation gives the doctor of pharmacy student an opportunity to acquire first-hand experience in the managerial, administrative, and alternative aspects of pharmacy practice. The experience focuses on the application of management principles in a professional practice setting. The administrative experience can be done at a variety of sites including hospitals, independent and chain community pharmacies, health maintenance organizations, managed care programs, third-party programs, colleges of pharmacy, and manufacturers. To accommodate the needs of the student and best use the resources of the site, the content of the rotation is flexible. It is recognized that each site has its own unique strengths to share with students. At the beginning of the experience, the preceptor and student should jointly select objectives from the attached "menu" below, keeping in mind other practical goals or objectives may also be pursued. It is recommended that approximately four objectives be selected, with about one week devoted to each and allowing for ad hoc experiences to occur.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
1
Note(s):

*Students are required to take 7 of the 12 listed rotations (56 credit hours) along with the 3 Essential Knowledge of Practice Review courses (10.5 credit hours) for a total of 65 required credit hours.  Students will 
take PHA6525, PHA6526, PHA6527, PHA6528, PHA6503, PHA6504, PHA6505 and any combination of three of the following: PHA6529, PHA6530, PHA6531, PHA6532, PHA6533, PHA6534, PHA6535, PHA6536 and PHA6537.  In addition, Grand Rounds (PHA6339) is an optional elective that students may elect to take in one of the last three quarters of the curriculum and will be scheduled at the discretion of the School of Pharmacy.

Pharmacy/Business Joint Degree (PharmD/MBA)

Offered at South University, Savannah to students enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree program.

South University offers the opportunity to pursue the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree simultaneously with the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree. This presents the student with the prospect of earning both degrees with an expected substantial time savings over that required to earn each degree separately.  Completion of degree requirements for the PharmD degree is expected to precede those of the MBA degree.

The South University Master of Business Administration program prepares students for leadership positions in profit and not for profit organizations. These positions require strong competencies in the fundamentals of business and management. The curriculum is designed to provide students a sound foundation in basic business skills followed by cross-functional core courses covering the best practices for business decisions to deliver goods and services to constituents.

Admission Requirements

Doctor of Pharmacy students with a grade point average of 2.70 or higher and not on academic or professional probation may apply to the MBA program upon completion of the equivalent of 120 undergraduate quarter hours.

Satisfactory Progress

The guidelines outlined in the Catalog and repeated in the School of Pharmacy Handbook will apply to courses taken to fulfill the requirements for the Pharm. D. degree. However, for subsequent courses taken to fulfill the requirements for the MBA degree, the guidelines outlined in the Catalog and repeated in the College of Business Handbook will apply. In addition, students with a grade of 2.00 or less in any course will be required to meet with the Pharm. D/MBA Directors of the Program to discuss their academic progress.

Sequence of Courses

After completion of the equivalent of 120 undergraduate quarter hours and acceptance to the MBA program, students may proceed to the fundamental and core courses. Upon completion of the core courses, students proceed to the specialization courses in the area of Pharmacy Administration. Upon completion of these specialization courses, students proceed to the MBA6999 Strategic Development and Implementation course. This completes the requirements for the MBA.

Master of Business Administration with Pharmacy Administration Specialization: 48 Credits

Foundation: 16 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course provides an overview of microeconomic concepts and applications to common business problems. Topics include supply and demand analysis, cost analysis, economics of scale, basic market types and their characteristics, pricing, risk analysis and the role of government in economic affairs.

Credits : 4

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This course provides a framework for managers to understand and assess the ethical and legal responsibilities of managers and the implications of their decisions. The course introduces an ethical framework for managers and explores the constitutional foundation for laws and regulations that affect businesses, employment and civil rights laws, contracts, intellectual property, corporate governance, securities and financial transactions and international law.

Credits : 4

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This course instills crucial analytical, communication and planning skills which are essential for success in the programs and in management careers. Topics covered in statistics, finance and accounting provide a vital foundation for expected performance in the program. Critical thinking and analytical skills will be developed as students become acquainted with the expectations of graduate business programs.

Credits : 4

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Sub-Total Credits
16

Core: 12 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
In this course students learn to apply analytical tools to making strategic financial decisions that add value to the shareholder. Students will learn to use financial statement analysis tools, value long-term securities, relate risk and return, perform financial forecasting, evaluate assets and portfolios, determine the firm's cost of capital and design an optimal financial structure.

Credits : 4

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This course provides a framework for examining key strategic marketing issues faced by modern organizations and helps students to develop an understanding of the marketing environment, customer and their buying behavior, the marketing research process, new product development, marketing channels, and marketing communication and advertising.

Credits : 4

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This course introduces students to the management activities involved in operating organizations within a global supply chain context. Students will learn how business functions (such as marketing, operations, and finance) interact to support decisions for successful execution of the organization's strategic plan.

Credits : 4

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Sub-Total Credits
12

Pharmacy Administration Specialization: 16 Credits

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course engages students in drug information and literature retrieval, interpretation, and application to clinical practice including communication of findings to patients, healthcare professionals, and regulatory organizations. These skill sets assist pharmacists with conducting practice activities that promote optimal health outcomes while minimizing/avoiding adverse events.

Credits : 3

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This course will introduce pharmacoeconomic evaluation methods (e.g. cost-minimization, cost- utility, cost-benefit, and cost-effectiveness) as applied to pharmaceutical products and services. Quality of life and health outcomes research will also be explored from a pharmacist's perspective.

Credits : 2

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This course is designed to introduce students to the essentials of pharmacy practice management. Human resource management principles and issues, accounting principles, and financial analytical techniques will be covered. Selected issues relevant to community and health-systems pharmacy will be covered through lectures and case studies. A major focus of the course is to understand and appy a variety of managerial principles and functions to directing, supervising, and developing pharmacy operations and services.

Credits : 3

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A administrative / management / academic non-patient care rotation gives the doctor of pharmacy student an opportunity to acquire first-hand experience in the managerial, administrative, and alternative aspects of pharmacy practice. The experience focuses on the application of management principles in a professional practice setting. The administrative experience can be done at a variety of sites including hospitals, independent and chain community pharmacies, health maintenance organizations, managed care programs, third-party programs, colleges of pharmacy, and manufacturers. To accommodate the needs of the student and best use the resources of the site, the content of the rotation is flexible. It is recognized that each site has its own unique strengths to share with students. At the beginning of the experience, the preceptor and student should jointly select objectives from the attached "menu" below, keeping in mind other practical goals or objectives may also be pursued. It is recommended that approximately four objectives be selected, with about one week devoted to each and allowing for ad hoc experiences to occur.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
12

Choose one course from the two courses listed below 

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about the concepts and practices of regulation and healthcare policy. Students will learn how policymaking relates to decisions that affect and regulate healthcare providers and patients. They will also gain insight into how they can influence the policymaking process including using healthcare data to formulate plans to improve healthcare service delivery. Students have an opportunity to assess and apply risk management information in situations relative to effective health facility operations in accordance with established laws

Credits : 4

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This course examines the quality assessment of both business practices and health care delivery focusing on outcome measurements, process/outcome relationships, and methods for process improvement. Quality management tools and techniques are reviewed with a focus on patient safety, clinical quality, care outcomes, and cost benefit analysis in patient care.

Credits : 4

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Sub-Total Credits
4
Note(s):

(PHA6536 APPE XII Elective Administrative Rotation will be required as part of the Pharm. D. course credits)

Capstone

Course Code
Title
Credits
This course explores the methods of directing a firm, or a significant division thereof in an internationally competitive environment. Students will develop an understanding of the way in which general managers formulate and implement business level strategy and corporate level strategy in today's market economy. These techniques will incorporate tools and perspectives for international and cooperative strategy. In this course students will also develop skills and perspectives in corporate leadership, corporate parenting, and corporate entrepreneurship.

Credits : 4

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Sub-Total Credits
4

Course Timing

  • Two foundation courses completed as electives during quarters 8 and 9
  • Two foundation courses completed in quarters 10 and 11
  • Four specialization courses completed during quarters 6, 7, and 9
  • Three core, one specialization, and capstone course completed in quarters 12, 13, and 14
  • One rotation must be in Pharmacy Administration

MBA with Pharmacy Administration Specialization Course Calendar

Quarter 1* through 6 all students follow the Pharmacy curriculum outline for the PharmD program.  Beginning in Quarter 8 PharmD/MBA students will add the MBA required courses to their Quarterly enrollment as follows: 

Quarter Required Courses
Q6 PHA4335 Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics 
Q7 PHA5333 Drug Information Research Design and PHA5353 Pharmacy Practice Management 
Q8 MBA5001 Organization Behavior and Communication as SOP Elective 
Q9 MBA5005 Law and Ethics for Managers as SOP Elective and PHA5350 Health Economics and Outcomes Assessment 
Q10 MBA5009 Managerial Environment 
Q11 MBA5004 Managerial Economics 
Q12 MBA6010 Managerial Finance 
Q13 MBA6011 Strategic Marketing  and MBA6012 Operations and Supply Chain Management 
Q14 MBA6999 Strategic Development and Implementation
Choice of one (1) of the following: MHC6303 Quality Performance and Management  or MHA6050 Regulation and Policy in Healthcare 

*Quarter 1 for the Pharm D program begins in the 2nd quarter of the calendar year.

Total Credits
219