Master of Science (MS)

Physician Assistant

Procedure for Admission to the Master in Science Physician Assistant Program

Entrance to the Physician Assistant (PA) program is gained through a formal application review and interview. Application to the program is made through the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA).  Applicants must specifically designate the South University campus(es) to which their application should be submitted within the CASPA system. Additional, campus-specific information regarding the application process can be obtained through the PA program web site or by calling the respective campus:

  • (512) 516-8800 (Austin)
  • (804) 727-6894 (Richmond)
  • (912) 201-8025 (Savannah)
  • (813) 393-3720 (Tampa)
  • (561) 273-6520 (West Palm Beach)

Individuals whose applications are deemed competitive will be invited for a required interview. All programs utilize a rolling admissions process in which applicants are notified of their admission decision within 2 weeks after interviewing. Not all qualified applicants will receive an interview.

The application process requires submission of scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Applicants must specifically designate the South University code for each campus to which their GRE scores should be submitted electronically to CASPA directly from ETS (Educational Testing Service):

  • 0174(Austin)
  • 7147 (Richmond)
  • 0467 (Savannah)
  • 0454 (Tampa)
  • 7108 (West Palm Beach)

For South University, Richmond, South University, Savannah, South University, Tampa, and South University, West Palm Beach applications must be completed and verified in the CASPA application portal. Submission deadlines vary by campus. Please refer to the individual program’s website for further details.

Applicants who are offered a seat into the Physician Assistant program are only permitted to reserve a seat at one campus. Within 14 calendar days of the applicant signing and submitting the acceptance form, it is the responsibility of the applicant to notify any other South University Physician Assistant program(s) of his/her intent to withdraw. Seat acceptance fees are non-transferable to other South University programs.

Note: Applicants should refer to the Physician Assistant Program policy on Acceptance Fee for more details.

Admission Criteria

Selection for the Physician Assistant program is highly competitive. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee an interview or admission. Successful applicants will generally exceed the minimum criteria. The following criteria represent the minimum conditions established for applicants interested in applying to the South University Physician Assistant Master of Science degree programs:

  • Applicants must have an earned bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution.
  • Applicants must have an overall GPA as calculated by the CASPA service of 3.0 or greater (on a 4.0 scale) (including undergraduate, post-baccalaureate, and graduate coursework)
  • Applicants should have a Biology-Chemistry-Physics (BCP) science GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) as calculated by the CASPA service. Applicants must submit scores from the GRE general exam directly to the CASPA service using the designated South University code for each campus to which their GRE scores should be submitted:
    • 3090 (Austin)
    • 7147 (Richmond)
    • 0467 (Savannah)
    • 0454 (Tampa)
    • 7108 (West Palm Beach)  
  • At least three letters of reference as part of the CASPA application must be submitted. At least one letter must be from a physician (MD/DO), Physician Assistant, or Nurse Practitioner with whom the applicant has worked or shadowed and to whom the applicant is not related. Impressive, well- articulated, and unequivocal letters attesting to the applicant’s motivation, communication and interpersonal skills, professionalism, and future contribution towards health care are considered competitive. Applicants with letters of reference from licensed medical providers (e.g., MD, DO, NP, PA) are considered to be more competitive.

Pre-requisite Courses

Applicants must complete all prerequisite courses listed below with a grade of C or better at a regionally accredited U.S. college or university prior to submission of his/her application. The PA program accepts prerequisite coursework completed in an online, virtual, or campus-based format from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university.

Required Pre-Requisite Duration
  Anatomy and Physiology

2 courses (sequenced)

  • Human Anatomy & Physiology I and II with Lab
    OR
  • Human Anatomy with Lab and Human Physiology with Lab

No course substitutions are accepted for this requirement

  General Biology

2 courses
Required:

  • General Biology I (Lab recommended)
  • General Biology II (Lab recommended)

Alternative Substitution for Biology II only:
Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Immunology

  General Chemistry and Labs

2 courses
Required:

  • General Chemistry I with Lab
  • General Chemistry II with Lab
  Microbiology with Lab

1 course
No course substitutions are accepted for this requirement

  Organic Chemistry or Biochemistry 1 course
Lab recommended, not required

Coursework which is designed for science majors is generally considered more competitive. In general, prerequisite coursework with titles that include “Essentials of,” “Survey of,” or “Introduction to,” unless specifically designed for science majors, are considered less competitive.

Basic science courses should be those for science majors. The General Biology and Biochemistry courses are recommended to include a lab, but it is not required.

Only courses (excluding General Biology, Biochemistry, and Organic Chemistry) with an associated lab will be given credit for fulfilling prerequisite requirements. In the event that a laboratory is not offered with a prerequisite course, applicants may request the lab requirement for that course be waived by contacting the program. Lab waivers and/or course substitutions are granted at the discretion of the Admissions Committee. Applicants requesting such should be prepared to submit supporting documents, including, but not limited to, course descriptions.

The South University Physician Assistant program accepts credit for Advanced Placement (AP) courses. AP courses taken and successfully completed will be counted as one course credit towards completion of the respective prerequisite subject. Grades earned in AP courses are not used in the calculation of the applicant’s overall or prerequisite GPA.

The South University Physician Assistant program does not accept College Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit for any prerequisite requirements.

South University Physician Assistant programs do not accept a transfer of credits from other physician assistant programs or provide enrolled students with a waiver of credit (i.e., advanced placement) for any component of the required curricular coursework. All students must complete each course in the South University Physician Assistant curriculum.

Master of Science Physician Assistant Technical Standards

In order to ensure that patients receive the best medical care possible, the faculty of the South University Physician Assistant program has identified certain skills and professional behaviors that are essential for successful progression of physician assistant students in the program. A student must possess skills and behaviors at a level of capability to perform a variety of duties required of a physician assistant as a health care professional.

Students with disabilities who can perform these skills and successfully execute professional behavior either unassisted, with dependable use of assistive devices, or by employing other reasonable accommodations are eligible to apply for enrollment in the program. Minimum performance standards include critical thinking, communication skills, observation skills, motor skills, and interpersonal abilities. Interested parties may contact the Physician Assistant program office for additional information about South University performance standards. These skills and behaviors include, but are not limited to:

Critical Thinking: A student must possess the intellectual, ethical, physical and emotional capabilities required to undertake the full curriculum and to achieve the levels of competence required by the faculty. The ability to solve problems, a skill that is critical to the practice of medicine, requires the intellectual abilities of measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and synthesis. Students must be able to perform demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences.

Communication Skills: A student should also be able to speak, to hear, and to observe patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and to perceive nonverbal communications. The student must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written forms.

Observation Skills: A student must be able to observe a patient accurately, both at a distance and in close proximity. This ability requires the functional use of vision and somatic sensation.

Motor Skills: A student should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other diagnostic techniques. A student should be able to execute movements reasonably required to move from area to area, maneuver in small places, calibrate and use large and small equipment, position and move patients, and provide patients with general care and emergency treatment.

Interpersonal Abilities: A student must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his or her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities required for the diagnosis and care of patients and the development of professionalism through mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients, families, and colleagues.

Clinical Experience

Clinical experiences should provide the applicant with a knowledge of and orientation to the presentation, signs, and symptoms of a variety of ill or injured patients. Although clinical experience is not required, preference is given to applicants who have direct patient care experience (i.e., care that involves personal interaction with patients such as: physical therapist, respiratory therapist, emergency medical technician/paramedic, nurse, or certified nursing assistant, or other similar professions). However, there is no requirement for a predetermined number of hours (or months) of health care experience to be earned by an applicant.

Admissions Committee Selection Factors

Applicants for admission are considered and ranked using multiple factors. Applicants are awarded preference points based upon the following selection factors:

  • Academic achievement (overall GPA, BCP, GRE)
    • Preference will be given to those with GRE scores (Quantitative and Verbal Reasoning) at the 50th percentile or above.
    • For overall GPA preferences, please refer to the respective program’s website.
    • For prerequisite BCP preferences, please refer to the respective program’s website.
  • Quality of letters of reference from medical providers (e.g., MD, DO, NP, PA)
  • Letters from personal acquaintances are discouraged.
  • Clinical experience that requires direct patient care
  • Personal statement/essay.
  • Healthcare provider mentorship/shadowing experiences.
  • Community service
  • Interview performance

Evidence of an applicant’s interpersonal skills, problem-solving ability, professionalism, motivation, academic potential, communication, knowledge of the PA profession and the health care system with an alignment to the mission and vision of the program are assessed by the Admissions Committee.

Post-Acceptance Requirements

Accepted applicants will be required to complete the following items in order to obtain approval for matriculation in January:

  • Satisfactory Criminal Background and Drug Screen Report
  • Health/ Immunization Requirements
  • Personal Health Insurance Documentation
  • Baccalaureate Diploma Verification
  • FAFSA application (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) submission for those applying for financial aid
  • There is a $1000 acceptance fee, which is non-refundable, for those applicants accepted into the Physician Assistant program at South University, Austin, South University, Savannah, South University, Tampa and South University, West Palm Beach. There is a $1000 acceptance fee, $900 of which is refundable, for those applicants accepted into the Physician Assistant program at South University, Richmond. Acceptance fees are applied towards tuition.

Applicants seeking admissions to the Physician Assistant program must abide by the College of Health Professions Background Check Policy and Substance Abuse and Screening Policy. Acceptance into a South University program or its completion does not guarantee that a student will be able to obtain subsequent licensure or certification.

All Physician Assistant program students are responsible for meeting matriculation deadlines and requirements as published within the campus-specific Enrollment Guide.

For additional admissions information please see the admissions section here

Offered at  Austin, Richmond, Savannah, Tampa and West Palm Beach.

Note: All Physician Assistant program policies apply to all students, principal faculty, and the program director regardless of location. (i.e., didactic or clinical)

Physician assistants perform many medical functions under the supervision of a licensed physician, including, but not limited to, evaluation, monitoring, diagnostics, therapeutics, counseling, and referral. The scope of the practice varies according to state laws, the medical setting, and the training of the physician assistant.

Vision Statement
The South University Master of Science in Physician Assistant (MSPA) degree program strives to provide an educational environment that empowers students to practice evidence-based, patient-centered medical care. With an emphasis on increasing access to care, reducing health disparities, and engaging in community outreach, we aim to provide inclusive educational experiences for students, faculty, and staff. As future clinical leaders, the program’s focus is to graduate physician assistants who will promote cultural humility and patient advocacy.

Mission Statement
The mission of the South University Physician Assistant (MSPA) is to educate a diverse student population and prepare graduates to practice the art and science of medicine while providing high-quality, equitable, and inclusive patient-centered healthcare.

Program Goals
The following are program goals for the South University Physician Assistant program:

  • The program aims to foster a culture of inclusivity and equity for students, faculty, and staff by means of education and resources.
  • The program will strive to adequately prepare graduating students to achieve a first-time pass rate that exceeds the national average upon completion of the Physician Assistant National Certification Examination (PANCE).
  • The program will provide opportunities for local community service and outreach that foster commitment to reducing health disparities.

Physician Assistant Learning Outcomes (Graduate Competencies)

The following are the program learning outcomes (Graduate Competencies) for the South University Physician Assistant program.

Prior to graduation from the program, students will: 

  • PLO-1. Integrate behavioral, social, and medical knowledge established from the evolving biomedical and clinical sciences in recognizing, evaluating, and managing patient disease states across the lifespan during acute, chronic, preventative, and emergent encounters.
  • PLO-2. Demonstrate the interpersonal and communication skills required to sustain effective, multi-directional information exchange within a diverse population of patients, their caregivers, and members of the healthcare team.
  • PLO-3. Demonstrate the ability to elicit an accurate patient history, perform an appropriate physical examination, and perform appropriate clinical procedures using essential clinical and technical skills to provide quality patient care.
  • PLO-4. Collaborate effectively as part of an interdisciplinary healthcare team through clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills to formulate a logical differential diagnosis, select and interpret appropriate diagnostic studies, and synthesize a comprehensive, patient-centered management plan for the promotion of wellness and disease prevention.
  • PLO-5. Demonstrate the ability to interpret and integrate an evidence-based approach to clinical and professional practice through clinical reasoning, problem- solving, and decision-making processes to improve patient care practices.
  • PLO-6. Demonstrate professionalism through personal behaviors, sensitivity, and accountability essential to patients, society, and the profession.

Comprehensive Exams

Completion of the didactic phase of the curriculum requires completion of a formative evaluation. The formative evaluation consists of written, skills performance and professionalism components, is administered at the end of the didactic training period. This evaluation is used to identify individual and collective weaknesses within the cohort that should be remediated and strengthened during the clinical phase of the program.

Successful completion of the program requires satisfactory completion of a comprehensive summative evaluation. The comprehensive summative evaluation consisting of written, skills performance and professionalism evaluation components is administered up to four (4) months before the completion of the clinical training period.

The test is designed to evaluate student's mastery of multiple student learning outcomes in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains. This evaluation is used to identify competence for entry into the Physician Assistant profession and thus eligibility for graduation.

There are three (3) distinct components of the graduate candidate's summative evaluation; written exam, clinical performance and final professional evaluation. Each must be successfully completed in order to earn a passing grade for the senior seminar.

PA Certification

Graduation from an accredited physician assistant program permits students to sit for the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE), administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, Inc. (NCCPA). The PANCE is designed to assess essential medical and surgical knowledge of graduate Physician Assistants in conducting a variety of healthcare functions normally encountered in practice.

South University does not guarantee third-party certification/ licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to South University. 

Master of Science in Physician Assistant (MSPA) Degree: 174 Credits

Didactic Phase (Physician Assistant Course Sequence)

1st Quarter: 17 Credits 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Diagnostic skills build critical thinking and decision-making competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students learn patient communication skills, interview techniques, and physical diagnostic techniques to complete a comprehensive physical examination of the relevant regions and systems of the body. Through discussion and case-based analysis, students master the skills required to complete a comprehensive physical examination. A separate laboratory course (PAS5200 Physical Diagnosis I Lab) provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate the skills needed to perform a complete physical examination of the body systems covered in this course.

Credits : 3

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Medical communication skills are essential in health care. Students identify the components of a complete and focused medical history utilizing effective interviewing skills. Documentation of patient encounters in a variety of settings will be explored.

Credits : 3

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Medical anatomy and physiology is the foundation of providing medical care to patients as a physician assistant. Students correlate anatomic and physiologic variations across the lifespan from fetal development to geriatrics.

Credits : 4

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Choosing diagnostics appropriately ensures patients receive high-value care. Students correlate clinical principles with selection of diagnostic tests and subsequent interpretation. Emphasis is placed on clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and formulation of a final diagnosis.

Credits : 3

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The Physician Assistant (PA) profession has evolved throughout its development in the medical community. Students explore the history and modernization of clinical PA practice with local and national laws, regulations, and policies. Activities will examine leadership and professionalism through accountability. An introduction to patient equity and healthcare systems will be provided. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 2

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Diagnostic skills build critical thinking and decision-making competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students demonstrate techniques of physical diagnosis to complete a comprehensive physical examination of the relevant regions and systems of the body. Through group practice, students master techniques necessary to complete a comprehensive physical examination.

Credits : 1

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Medical Anatomy and Physiology is the foundation of providing medical care to patients as a physician assistant. Through the laboratory setting, students correlate anatomic and physiologic variations across the lifespan from fetal development to geriatrics.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
17

2nd Quarter: 21 Credits 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Diagnostic skills build critical thinking and decision-making competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students continue learning patient communication skills, techniques of interviewing, and physical diagnostic techniques to complete the comprehensive physical examination. Through discussion and case-based analysis, students further master the skills required to complete a comprehensive physical examination. A separate laboratory course (PAS5215 Physical Diagnosis II Lab) allows the student an opportunity to demonstrate the skills needed to perform a complete physical examination of the body systems covered in this course.

Credits : 3

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Medical anatomy and physiology is the foundation of providing medical care to patients as a physician assistant. Students continue correlating anatomic and physiologic variations across the lifespan from fetal development to geriatrics.

Credits : 4

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The integration of law and ethics within the practice of medicine impacts patient management. Students examine their professional responsibility, duty to treat, and patient advocacy through ethical problem-solving skills. Through discussion, analysis, and case-based scenarios, students examine dilemmas faced by those in clinical practice.

Credits : 2

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Clinical medicine is the core foundation of managing acute, chronic, and emergent medical disease progression across the life span. Through lectures and clinical scenarios, students explore the system-based epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and therapeutic management of diseases common to primary care practice. Preventative medical care with a focus on patient education is examined.

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Diagnostic skills build critical thinking and decision-making competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students demonstrate techniques of interviewing, physical diagnosis, and documentation to complete the comprehensive physical examination of the relevant regions and systems of the body. Through group practice, students further master techniques necessary to complete a comprehensive physical examination.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

Medical Anatomy and Physiology is the foundation of providing medical care to patients as a physician assistant. Through the laboratory setting, students continue to correlate anatomic and physiologic variations across the lifespan from fetal development to geriatrics.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

Clinical experiences build interpersonal communication skills and clinical reasoning competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students practice techniques of interviewing, physical diagnosis, and documentation in a variety of community clinical sites. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

The application of clinical medicine through clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving abilities, interpersonal skills, and professional behaviors required for PA practice. Managing medical diseases and disorders across the lifespan in a systems-based approach allows students to apply the didactic knowledge gained in the classroom. Through small group instruction, students rotate through patient evaluation and management skills stations, clinical case scenarios, simulation and debriefing culminating in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) skills assessment in the laboratory.

Credits : 1

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Sub-Total Credits
21

3rd Quarter: 18 Credits 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Evaluation and management of patients with behavioral and mental health conditions influence physician assistants in all disciplines of medicine. Students examine effective interviewing methods, physical examination techniques, and pharmacological principles to treat psychiatric and behavioral conditions across the life span. Students also examine areas in the social and behavioral sciences with application to clinical practice, including human sexuality; response to illness, injury, and stress; the detection and treatment of substance abuse; and the identification and prevention of violence and neglect.

Credits : 3

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Interpretation of electrocardiography and radiologic imaging is essential in the diagnosis and treatment of patients across the life span. Students recognize medical disease processes using a systematic approach to electrocardiogram (EKG) analysis and selection of imaging modalities. Students also interpret EKGs and radiologic diagnostic testing through case-based methodology.

Credits : 4

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Clinical medicine is the core foundation of managing acute, chronic, and emergent medical disease progression across the life span. Through lectures and clinical scenarios, students continue to explore the system-based epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and therapeutic management of diseases common to primary care practice. Preventative medical care with a focus on patient education is examined.

Credits : 8

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Clinical experiences build interpersonal communication skills and clinical reasoning competencies physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students continue practicing techniques of interviewing, physical diagnosis, and documentation in a variety of community clinical sites with a focus on preventative medicine. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 2

View Full Course

The application of clinical medicine through clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving abilities, interpersonal skills, and professional behaviors required for PA practice. Managing medical diseases and disorders across the lifespan in a systems-based approach allows students to apply the didactic knowledge gained in the classroom. Through small group instruction, students continue to rotate through patient evaluation and management skills stations, clinical case scenarios, simulation and debriefing culminating in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) skills assessment in the laboratory.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
18

4th Quarter: 21 Credits 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Managing medical diseases and disorders across the life span with attention to the diversity and vulnerability of the patient population allows students to apply the medical knowledge gained in the classroom. Social determinants of health and cultural competency are factors related to patient compliance and outcomes. Through discussion, analysis, and case-based scenarios, students evaluate differing beliefs, values, and expectations which impact methods of patient education, counseling, and decision-making.

Credits : 3

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Public health and disease surveillance are integral in preventative medical care incorporating evidence-based medicine. Students research population health concepts derived from the medical literature as they relate to the treatment of their patients. Through research, analysis, and discussion, students incorporate evidence-based medicine into preventative care management of patients.

Credits : 4

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Surgical and clinical procedural competencies are essential for physician assistant practice. Students examine the indications and risks associated with clinical procedures performed in various practice settings. Through lectures and labs, students focus on clinical and technical skills.

Credits : 4

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Clinical medicine is the core foundation of managing acute, chronic, and emergent medical disease progression across the life span. Through lectures and clinical scenarios, students continue to explore the system-based epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and therapeutic management of diseases common to primary care practice. Preventative medical care with a focus on patient education is examined.

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical experiences build interpersonal communication skills and clinical reasoning competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students continue practicing techniques of interviewing, physical diagnosis, and documentation in a variety of community clinical sites. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

The application of clinical medicine through clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving abilities, interpersonal skills, and professional behaviors are required for PA practice. Managing medical diseases and disorders across the lifespan in a systems-based approach allows students to apply the didactic knowledge gained in the classroom. Through small group instruction, students continue to rotate through patient evaluation and management skills stations, clinical case scenarios, simulation and debriefing culminating in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) skills assessment in the laboratory.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
21

5th Quarter: 23 Credits 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Managing medical diseases and disorders across the life span with attention to the diversity and vulnerability of the patient population allows students to apply the medical knowledge gained in the classroom. Social determinants of health and cultural competency are factors related to patient compliance and outcomes. Through discussion, analysis, and case-based scenarios, students continue to evaluate differing beliefs, values, and expectations which impact methods of patient education, counseling, and decision-making.

Credits : 4

View Full Course

Surgical and clinical procedural competencies are essential for PA practice. Students examine the indications and risks associated with clinical procedures performed in various practice settings. Through lectures and labs, students continue to apply clinical and technical skills.

Credits : 2

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The Physician Assistant (PA) profession has evolved throughout its development in the medical community. Students explore the professional development required in clinical PA practice with preparation for clinical rotations to include licensure, hospital credentials, liability, malpractice, safety, and building an individual portfolio. Activities will examine leadership and professionalism through accountability. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 3

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Clinical medicine is the core foundation of managing acute, chronic, and emergent medical disease progression across the life span. Through lectures and clinical scenarios, students continue to explore the system-based epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and therapeutic management of diseases common to primary care practice. Preventative medical care with a focus on patient education is examined.

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Evaluation and management of patients with emergent and urgent health conditions influence physician assistants in all disciplines of medicine. Students examine effective interviewing methods, physical examination techniques, and pharmacological principles to treat emergent and urgent conditions across the life span. Through discussion and case-based analysis, students integrate evaluation techniques and management of patients in the emergent setting.

Credits : 4

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Clinical experiences build interpersonal communication skills and clinical reasoning competencies in physician assistants managing patients across the life span. Students continue practicing techniques of interviewing, physical diagnosis, and documentation in a variety of community clinical sites. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

The application of clinical medicine through clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving abilities, interpersonal skills, and professional behaviors are required for PA practice. Managing medical diseases and disorders across the lifespan in a systems-based approach allows students to apply the didactic knowledge gained in the classroom. Through small group instruction, students continue to rotate through patient evaluation and management skills stations, clinical case scenarios, simulation and debriefing culminating in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) skills assessment in the laboratory.

Credits : 1

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
23

Didactic Phase Total: 100 Credits

Clinical Phase 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

View Full Course

Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

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Clinical Rotations I-VIII are designed to provide the student with supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPEs) that will reinforce medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, clinical and technical skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving integration, and professionalism behaviors required for PA practice. This rotation may be conducted in one of the required disciplines (i.e. Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Women’s Health, Pediatrics, Surgery, or Behavioral Medicine) or other various disciplines as a Clinical Elective. Based upon the assigned medical discipline, students will participate in the care of patients across the lifespan (e.g. infants, children, adolescents, adults, and/or elderly), through a variety of different encounters (e.g. acute, chronic, emergent, and/or preventative), and in various clinical settings (e.g. outpatient, inpatient, operating room, and/or emergency department).

Credits : 8

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This is the first course in a three-course sequence designed to increase and enhance student learning during the clinical phase of the Physician Assistant Program. The course is designed to provide instruction on areas of clinical practice essential for the PA student to develop clinical skills and allows for formative and/or summative assessments of clinical competencies.. While some professional topics are a regular part of the course on an annual basis, other clinical topics are inserted or removed as the knowledge and skills needs of each cohort are determined through various assessments, on areas of clinical practice essential for the PA student to develop clinical skills and allows for formative and/or summative assessments of clinical competencies. Other clinical topics are inserted or removed as the knowledge and skills needs of each cohort are determined through various assessments. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 2

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This is the second course in a three-course sequence designed to increase and enhance student learning during the clinical phase of the Physician Assistant Program. The course is designed to provide instruction on areas of clinical practice essential for the PA student to develop clinical skills and allows for formative and/or summative assessments of clinical competencies. While some professional topics are a regular part of the course on an annual basis, other clinical topics are inserted or removed as the knowledge and skills needs of each cohort are determined through various assessments, on areas of clinical practice essential for the PA student to develop clinical skills and allows for formative and/or summative assessments of clinical competencies. Other clinical topics are inserted or removed as the knowledge and skills needs of each cohort are determined through various assessments. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 2

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This is the final course in a three-course sequence designed to increase and enhance student learning during the clinical phase of the Physician Assistant Program. The course is designed to provide instruction on areas of clinical practice essential for the PA student to develop clinical skills and allows for formative and/or summative assessments of clinical competencies. While some professional topics are a regular part of the course on an annual basis, other clinical topics are inserted or removed as the knowledge and skills needs of each cohort are determined through various assessments, on areas of clinical practice essential for the PA student to develop competent clinical skills and allows for formative and/or summative assessments of clinical competencies. Other clinical topics are inserted or removed as the knowledge and skills needs of each cohort are determined through various assessments. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 2

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This course is designed to be a capstone course in the physician assistant curriculum. It is designed to review competency and evaluate knowledge and skills deemed essential for successful completion of the program and entry into the PA profession. The course includes an extensive didactic review of medical topics in a system-based approach. Evaluations are conducted to assess each student's knowledge, interpersonal skills, patient care skills, critical thinking, problem solving, and professionalism. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits : 4

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Sub-Total Credits
74

Clinical Phase Total: 74

The courses below are offered on an as needed basis: 

Course Code
Title
Credits
Sub-Total Credits
16

Note(s):

No physician assistant credits from another institution may transfer into the didactic or clinical phase. Master of Science in Physician Assistant students must complete the entire 27 month program (174 credit hours) at South University. 

Total Credits
174