The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
Request info# Request info#
    South University
   
 
  Dec 12, 2017
 
 
    
2016-2017 South University Academic Catalog Version II [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Affairs


 


Academic Honesty

See also: Graduate Honor Code & Graduate Honor Council of South University and Honor Council of the South University School of Pharmacy

Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. Plagiarism and cheating will result in one of several sanctions, depending on the seriousness of the offense. Infractions of the academic honesty policy may result in receiving a failing grade for the assignment, receiving a failing grade for the course or even expulsion from school. These policies apply to both undergraduate and graduate students.

For a full description of the Academic Honesty Policy and the possible sanctions, please refer to the Student Handbook and Faculty Handbook. Student Handbooks are available in the office of the Dean of Student Affairs and the Dean of Academic Affairs and online.

Graduate students are governed by an Honor Code, the details of which are found below and in the Student Handbook and Faculty Handbook.

[return to top of page]

Graduate Honor Code & Graduate Honor Council of South University

While I attend South University, I will be a fair and honorable student, and will promote fair and honorable conduct in others. I will not cheat, and I will not help others to cheat. I will do my own work, and give proper and truthful reference to those whose work has contributed any amount of content to mine.

The following policy may be superseded by similar policies specific to a College/School. Faculty should consult applicable documents in the College/School in which they are teaching. In the absence of such policies, the following policy is in effect.

The Honor Code is a policy describing expectations of student decorum in all aspects of graduate education at South University.  Each College/School, due to its administrative structure and programmatic length may deviate slightly in the constitution of its particular Graduate Honor Council or in the nature of information flow.  However, the fundamental concepts of definition of violations, reporting, investigation, hearing, and penalties are to remain consistent.  As the following represents an academic process of the University, no official or unofficial legal representation (e.g., attorneys) will be allowed to attend any of the identified proceedings.

Article I - Name

The name of this Article shall be the Graduate Honor Council of the South University Graduate Schools.

Article II - Purpose

The purposes of the Graduate Honor Council are to:

  1. Investigate and hear cases involving Graduate School students accused of honor code violations;
  2. Act as a judicial body and establish the guilt or innocence of students;
  3. Recommend the disciplinary action to be taken, in all cases, in which the Graduate Honor Council determines there has been a violation;
  4. Work with the faculty and the administration of Graduate programs within the identified College or School regarding the administration of the Graduate Honor Code.      

Article III - Authority

Student authority to request revision of the contents of any article resides with the College/School Graduate Honor Council.  Any revisions are subject to approval by the faculty, the Dean and the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs.  The responsibility for the enforcement of the Graduate Honor Council’s findings lies with the faculty, Program Director, Department Chair, and Progress and Promotions committees.

Article IV - Membership

Section A.  Each College/School of South University (College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business, College of Creative Art and Design, College of Health Professions, School of Pharmacy, College of Nursing and Public Health and the College of Theology) shall maintain its own Graduate Honor Council.  The Graduate Honor Council shall be assembled according to the nomination and selection process identified in the membership selection procedures section.  The Graduate Honor Council consists of faculty and student members.  A total of seven faculty members and seven student members will be selected to serve on the College/School Graduate Honor Council.  A quorum for a Graduate Honor Council hearing is defined as five voting members consisting of two faculty members and three student members.  One alternate faculty member and one alternate student member shall be chosen to replace a member that may be unavailable, recused, or removed from the Honor Council.  Membership for the Graduate Honor Council necessitates good academic and professional standing.  Terms of membership include a two year period for faculty and twelve to twenty four month period for student members.

Section B.  The duties of Graduate Honor Council members are to:

  • Attend all meetings of the Graduate Honor Council;
  • Participate in and render objective judgment in discovery and hearing procedures;
  • Assist in educating Graduate School students and faculty on the principles and practice of the honor code;
  • Participate in training opportunities.

Section C.  In the event of a vacancy on the Honor Council (faculty or student), an alternate member chosen by majority vote of the Honor Council from the provided list, will become an active member of the Honor Council.  The student replacement should be from the same class level as the vacated position (e.g., second year student).  Notification will occur within 7 days of the vacancy and will be made by the President of the Honor Council (see Article V).  If, for any reason, the President of the Honor Council leaves office, it will be the Honor Council’s responsibility to select a replacement via majority vote.

Section D.  The Graduate Honor Council will have a Faculty Advisor appointed by the College/School Dean.  The Faculty Advisor will serve as a non-voting Member of the Graduate Honor Council.  The Faculty Advisor is recused should he or she have direct involvement in a case before the Honor Council.  The duties of the Faculty Advisor shall be to:

  • Attend Graduate Honor Council proceedings;
  • Advise the Graduate Honor Council on procedural matters;
  • Ensure that due process and equitable procedures are followed in all cases before the Graduate Honor Council and advise on matters of precedent;
  • Inform accused students of the honor Council’s protocol and procedures throughout the progression of a case;
  • Notify the accused students of actions, hearings, verdicts and penalties as well as to generally act as a liaison between the Honor Council and the accused student;
  • Provide proper notification of any Honor Council action to the appropriate administrative personnel and faculty;
  • Ensure that appropriate documentation is completed by the Secretary for all hearings and other Honor Council meetings;
  • Provide proper communication and documentation to Graduate Honor Council members for all cases;
  • Supervise and conduct investigations during the “Period of discovery.”

The College or School Dean shall also appoint a Faculty Advisor Alternate.  In the event the Faculty Advisor is recused from a case, the Faculty Advisor Alternate will replace the Faculty Advisor during the proceedings of that particular case.

Section E.  The following exceptions may be made to participation of members in hearing procedures:

  • If a potential conflict of interest exists or some extraordinary circumstance outside of one’s control, a member of the Graduate Honor Council may recuse himself or herself in a particular case. The wish of an honor council member to recuse oneself from a specific hearing should be reported to the Faculty Advisor of the Honor Council within 3 days of written notification of the case.  This request should be made before any active participation occurs with the case.
  • If the Graduate Honor Council President considers that a potential conflict of interest exists wherein one of the council members should not hear a particular case; he/she shall inform him/her accordingly.  Should the decision of the President be disputed by the Honor Council Member, this issue of recusal should be decided by a vote of the full Honor Council following open discussion.
  • If the Graduate Honor Council considers that a potential conflict of interest exists wherein the President should be recused in a particular case, the issue should be addressed with the President in a meeting of the Honor Council.  Should the President dispute the recusal, the issue should be decided by a vote of the full Honor Council following open discussion.
  • The accused Graduate student will be provided a listing of the Graduate Honor Council members at least 48 hours prior to the start of the hearing.  If the accused Graduate Student considers that a potential conflict of interest exists wherein a Graduate Student Honor Council Member (Student or Faculty) should be recused, the issue should be addressed with the Faculty Advisor.  Should the Graduate Student Honor Council Member dispute the recusal, the issue should be decided by a vote of the full Honor Council following open discussion.

Section F. Removal of a Graduate Honor Council member for any reason not limited to but including issues of academic or professional integrity will be at the discretion of the Faculty Advisor and Faculty Advisor Alternate.

Article V - Officers

Section A.  The officers of theHonor Council shall consist of a President and Secretary, chosen from among and by the Honor Council members.  Both positions shall be filled by students.

Section B.  The Officers must have completed at least two quarters (or six (6) months) of the program or have past experience serving on the Graduate Honor Council.
 

Section C.  The duties of the President shall be to:

  1. Preside over all meetings;
  2. Direct the processes of all trials;
  3. Represent the Graduate Honor Council in all appropriate affairs;
  4. Supervise the investigation of all cases;
  5. Ensure the integrity of all proceedings by strict adherence to the established procedures of the Graduate Honor Council.

Section D.  The duties of the Secretary shall be to:

  1. Maintain written minutes of all Honor Council meetings and hearings;
  2. Maintain a true and accurate record, by audio recording and in writing, of all trial proceedings;
  3. Prepare written communications from the Honor Council regarding violations and Honor Council actions;
  4. Prepare official written communications to the Faculty Advisor for distribution to appropriate persons regarding Honor Council actions;
  5. Inform the members of the Honor Council of all meetings through written communication (hard copy or electronic).
  6. For hearings, written minutes should be de-identified and assigned a specific case number.

Article VI - Meetings

Section A.  A meeting of the Graduate Honor Council will be held after appointment and after the selection of new members to acquaint members with their duties and responsibilities.

Section B.  The President may call special meetings at any time either independently or at the request of any Honor Council member.

Section C.  The time and place for all meetings shall be determined by the President.  The meeting shall be held in a manner wherein confidentiality can be ensured.

Section D.  All members of the Honor Council are expected to attend all meetings of the Honor Council.  Failure to do so may be grounds for removal.

Section E.  In the event that the Honor Council must meet during regularly scheduled class time, the members of the Honor Council shall be excused from conflicting classes and clinical experiences to attend the meeting.  The affected faculty or preceptor shall be notified in advance of this excused absence by the Faculty Advisor.

Article VII - Commencement of Proceedings

Section A.  All persons, including faculty having knowledge of or being witness to acts believed to be in violation of the Graduate Honor Code shall report in writing the fact, along with any pertinent physical evidence, to the Faculty Advisor of the Graduate Honor Council of his/her College or School, preferably within 72 hours of the alleged violation.  In the event the Faculty advisor is unavailable, the information shall be reported to the College/School Dean.

Section B.  A written statement about the violation by the witness(es) shall be required to begin the “Period of Discovery.” or investigation.

Section C.  Failure to report violations will be considered a form of illegal aid covered under Article X, Section A.

Article VIII - Case Procedure

Section A.  Cases shall generally be resolved within 30 calendar days after they are reported.  Note: The time allotted for case resolutions may be extended (up to an additional ten calendar days) in the event additional time is required.  This determination will be made by the Faculty Advisor and Faculty Advisor Alternate upon receipt of a formal request from the President of the Graduate Honor Council.  In such event, all parties involved will be notified promptly following the approval of the request for additional time.

Section B.  The procedure for handling cases shall be as follows:

  • Within 5 days of receiving written information about a possible violation, the Faculty Advisor and a Student member of the Graduate Honor Council shall be responsible for conducting the “Period of Discovery,” involving conducting of witness interviews, reviewing of evidence, and ultimately making a decision regarding whether or not to bring the case before the Graduate Honor Council.
  • The Period of Discovery determines if sufficient evidence exists to proceed with a hearing.  If it is determined that sufficient evidence exists, the case will be presented to the Honor Council and a hearing will generally be scheduled to begin within 7 days.  In the event of insufficient evidence, the case will be dropped.
  • If the case is accepted, the Faculty Advisor will promptly notify the accused that he/she has been accused of a violation. The accused shall be fully informed of the nature of the charges.   Notification will be provided orally and in writing via email and letter by registered mail.   The accused shall be provided a copy of the violation and written notice of his or her rights to appear before the Honor Council, to testify on his/her own behalf, to present evidence and question witnesses. If the Graduate Honor Council is using the accuser’s testimony in determining the guilt or innocence of the accused, the student has the right to confront the accuser.  The accused may at any time waive the right to a hearing by admitting guilt to the charges brought.
  • The accused may choose another registered, degree-seeking student as his/her advocate.  He/she shall also have the right to provide his/her own witnesses.  Witnesses are strictly limited to persons with direct evidence or direct knowledge of the alleged offense.  Character witnesses are excluded from providing testimony.
  • All persons involved shall be notified promptly by the Faculty Advisor of the time and place of the hearing.  Each individual shall be bound not to reveal the details of any alleged violation of the Graduate Honor Code.  Any disclosure by any participant about the case shall be considered a violation of the Graduate Honor Code.

Article IX - Hearing Procedure

Section A.  Hearings of the Graduate Honor Council are closed.  As such, all witnesses will be interviewed separately.  The accused and any accused’s advocate are permitted to be present for all presentation of evidence and witness testimony.  The accuser is not required to attend the hearing.

Note: In the rare event that a student is unable physically to attend the Graduate Honor Council proceedings in person, he/she will be required to sign a statement of confidentiality attesting to the fact that no one else is in the same room or able to hear the proceedings during the hearing and that no audio/video recordings are being made of the hearing. The student will also be required to join the hearing via University-approved video conferencing.  In the event a student violates the statement of confidentiality/attestation, he/she is subject to being charged with an academic/professional violation(s) with penalty(ies) to be decided in a separate hearing.

Section B.  The procedure for conducting a hearing shall be as follows:

  1. Following a formal reading of the charges, the accused is required to enter a plea before testimony is heard.
  2. Each person providing testimony will be required to testify under oath.  Both the Graduate Honor Council members and the accused will be afforded an opportunity to question persons providing testimony.
  3. The Honor Council may allow the introduction of evidence other than testimony of witnesses if the Honor Council determines that the evidence is relevant.
  4. Proceedings of each hearing shall be recorded in writing and on audio recording and shall be labeled and signed by the Secretary and the President of the Honor Council.
  5. After hearing all testimony and reviewing all relevant evidence, the accused, any accused advocate, and all witnesses will be excused for the Honor Council deliberation.
  6. The Honor Council shall vote by secret ballot with the outcome determined by a simple majority.
  7. The Graduate Honor Council Faculty Advisor shall verbally notify the defendant of the judgment of the Honor Council. In the case of a not guilty adjudication, the Faculty advisor shall inform the accused by phone.  In cases of guilt, the Faculty Advisor shall inform the accused of the penalty verbally and in writing (via registered mail) within 4 working days of the final hearing. The Faculty Advisor shall provide a summary report along with specific outcomes of the Honor Council’s proceedings to the College/School Dean.
  8. In cases in which the accused is adjudged not guilty, all transcriptions, except de-identified minutes, and audio recordings shall be destroyed immediately by the Faculty Advisor. De-identified minutes shall be provided to the appropriate College/School Dean. In cases of guilt, the transcriptions and tapes shall be delivered by the Secretary and filed in a closed file in the office of the College/School Dean.  The office of the College/School Dean shall maintain this file for a period of 10 years.

Section C.  The decision rendered by the Honor Council will be its final decision. 

If a student who has been found to be guilty (or a student who has confessed guilt) continues to believe the penalty is inappropriate, the student may then appeal the decision of the Honor Council to the College/School Dean.  Grounds for an appeal should be submitted in writing to the office of the College/School Dean by the accused within five (5) business days of written notification of the Honor Council decision and penalty.   The College/School Dean may uphold or negate the recommendation of the Honor Council following due consideration of the appeal. The decision of the College/School Dean is final.

Section D.  Confidentiality and Notification:

1.   The only individuals who will be informed of an investigation of the Graduate Honor Council will be the honor council members, the accused, the accuser(s), the witness (es), the Faculty Advisor to the Honor Council, the Faculty Advisor alternate, the Department Chair, the College/School Dean, and the Chair of the Progress and Promotions Committee.

2.   The only faculty members who will be informed of the outcome of the Graduate Honor Council investigation will be the Faculty Advisor to the Honor Council, the Faculty Advisor Alternate, the Department Chair, the College/School Dean and the accused student’s Faculty Advisor, and the faculty accuser(s).  The Chair of the Progress and Promotions Committee shall also be notified of the Honor Council’s decisions.

Article X - Honor Code Violations

Section A.  The following shall be deemed Graduate Honor Code violations and shall be the basis for reporting cases to the Honor Council and for convictions by the Honor Council.  Other violations, not listed below, may also be considered reportable to the Graduate Honor Council upon recommendation of a faculty member, Program Director, or Progressions Committee.

  1. Cheating on an academic work.  For example:
  • Giving or receiving, or otherwise utilizing unauthorized assistance in connection with any examination, work submitted by the student for credit, or work performed as a required element of a course or clinic;
  • Using or attempting to use unauthorized material, aid or device prior to or during a test;
  • Using, buying, selling, stealing, transporting or soliciting, in whole or in part or the attempt to use, buy, sell, steal, transport or solicit the contents of an un-administered test that is expected to be administered;
  • Substituting for another student, or permitting another student to substitute for oneself, to take a test;
  • Obtaining or attempting to physically obtain a test without authorization prior to administration or attempting to obtain unauthorized or reserved information about a test prior to administration;
  • Obtaining, replicating or attempting to replicate, without authorization, an administered secure examination which has been designated for viewing only;
  • Obtaining or attempting to physically obtain a test without authorization prior to administration of attempting to obtain unauthorized or reserved information about a test prior to administration;
  • Obtaining, replicating or attempting to replicate, without authorization, an administered secure examination which has been designated for viewing only;
  1. Providing information to another student with the intent to affect another student’s academic performance;
  2. Obstructing the attempts of another student to engage in academic activities with the intent to affect the other student’s academic performance;
  3. Falsifying , fabricating, or misrepresenting one’s credentials or any other academic achievement or endeavor;
  4. Disclosing information about a patient, along with the information suggesting the identity of that patient, to a person who is not, at the time of the disclosure, a member of the patient’s health care team, without prior authorization from the patient
  5. Making a false report of a Graduate Honor Code violation;
  6. Obstructing the investigation or examination of an alleged Honor Code violation;
  7. Destroying, hiding, or fabricating evidence related to a Graduate Honor Council proceeding;
  8. Academic indiscretion;
  9. Fabrication;
  10. Forgery, alteration, destruction, or misuse of School documents, medical records, prescriptions, physician’s excuses, etc.;
  11. Attempted or actual theft of property of the School or of a member of the Institution’s community or campus visitor;
  12. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys to any premises of the School, or unauthorized entry, or use of the premises of the School;
  13. Conspiring, planning, or attempting to achieve any of the above acts;
  14. Plagiarism
  15. Knowingly failing to report committed acts proscribed in Article X herein.
  16. Any student who knowingly or intentionally provides illegal aid shall be considered as responsible as the student who receives it and will be dealt with by the Graduate Honor Council in the appropriate manner

Any student who knowingly or intentionally provides illegal aid shall be considered as responsible as the student who receives it and will be dealt with by the Graduate Honor Council in the appropriate manner.                              

Article XI - Penalties

Section A.  Upon determining a violation of the Graduate Honor Code or a plea of guilty, the Graduate Honor Council will submit the decision to the appropriate individual/committee.  Decisions by the Graduate Honor Council are final.

Note: Students found to be in violation of the Graduate Honor Code may also be subject to sanctions from the Progress and Promotions committee from their degree program, beyond those assigned by the Graduate Honor Council.

The standard penalty for violation of the Graduate Honor Code is permanent expulsion.  The student will receive a grade of Incomplete for all courses in which he/she is enrolled at the time of the infraction.  Depending on the circumstances of the case, the Graduate Honor Council may assign a penalty less severe than permanent expulsion.  These penalties include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Disciplinary probation for Graduate Honor Code Violation.  The student may receive a grade of F (0.00) for a given course as well as a grade of Incomplete, Withdrawal, or Withdrawal Failing for one or more courses in which he/she is enrolled at the time of the infraction.
  2. A mandatory leave of absence from South University for approximately one academic year. The student will be permitted to return from a mandatory leave of absence according to the policies as stated in the Graduate Student Handbook of the program in which he/she is enrolled.  In the event a policy does not exist for the program in which the student is enrolled:
    1. The student will be permitted to return from a mandatory leave of absence at the commencement of the term for the courses in which the violation occurred.
    2. The student will receive a grade of Incomplete for all courses in which he/she is enrolled at the time of infraction.
    3. Upon receipt of a mandatory leave of absence, the student cannot advance until he/she has completed the term in which the Incomplete grades were assigned.
    4. At the discretion of the Department Chair in consultation with the College/School Dean, the student may be required to enroll as a student in special standing for the purposes of review or remediation prior to enrollment as a full time student. 
  3. Assignment of a grade of zero for a given examination, test or assignment.

Section B.  The penalty imposed may be appealed to the College/School Dean as outlined in Article IX.

Section C.  In the case of an appeal, the College/School Dean makes the final decision and reports the decision to the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs.

Section D.        In the event a student admits guilt prior to the initiation of a Graduate Honor Council hearing, penalty will be determined by the Faculty Advisor and a Student member of the Graduate Honor Council.  Following, penalty decisions made by the Graduate Faculty Advisor and Student member will be reviewed and approved by the President of the Graduate Honor Council.  Notification of penalty will occur as outlined in Article IX, Section B, item 7.  

Article XII - Amendments

Section A.  Amendments to the present statute may be proposed by the Graduate Honor Council.  Proposals shall be forwarded to the Council of Deans and Council of Presidents for final approval when ratified by three-fourths of the members of the Graduate Honor Council at the next meeting following the proposal of the amendment.

Section B.  Ratified amendments shall become effective thirty days after final approval by the Council of Presidents.

Article XIII - Membership Selection Procedures

Section A.  Student members of the Graduate Honor Council shall be selected by the existing Graduate Honor Council and in accordance with the following procedures:

  1. An announcement requesting graduate student member applications will be released by the Faculty Advisor (or Faculty Advisor alternate) within the College/School along with the identified deadline and notification date.   
  2. Student applicants  must submit a completed Graduate Honor Council Member Application consisting of:
    1. A statement of interest (a one-page minimum)
    2. A letter of attestation regarding the student’s standing in the program (i.e., academic, professional, clinical) and suitability to serve on the committee.  This statement must be obtained from the student’s Program Director (on ground) or Graduate Team Member (online).
    3. Demographic information (e.g., time in program, contact information)
  3. Applications will be reviewed during a scheduled meeting of the Graduate Honor Council.  Note: GPA information will be redacted from the application materials. 
  4. All applicants will be notified within 24 hours of the Honor Council’s decision regarding his/her application via email.  In some cases, it may be necessary to contact an applicant via phone.

Section B.  Faculty members of the Graduate Honor Council shall be selected by the existing Graduate Honor Council and in accordance with the following procedures:

  1. An announcement requesting faculty member applications will be released by the Faculty Advisor (or Faculty Advisor alternate) within the College/School along with the identified deadline and notification date.   
  2. Faculty applicants must submit a completed Graduate Honor Council Member Application consisting of:
    1. A statement of interest (a one-page minimum)
    2. A letter of support from his/her direct supervisor.
    3. Curriculum Vitae
  3. Applications will be reviewed during a scheduled meeting of the Graduate Honor Council.
  4. Applicants will be notified via email of the Honor Council’s decision.  In some cases, it may be necessary to contact an applicant via phone.

Section C.  To maintain an optimal composition of experience between existing and newly selected members, appointment terms (as outlined in Article IV, Section A) and start dates (i.e., Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall) will be assigned accordingly.  This decision shall be made jointly by the Faculty Advisor and Graduate Honor Council President.

Honor Council of the South University School of Pharmacy

Article I - Name

The Name of this organization shall be the Honor Council of the South University School of Pharmacy

Article II - Purpose

The purposes of the Honor Council are to:

  1. Investigate and hear cases involving School of Pharmacy students accused of academic dishonesty
  2. Act as a hearing body and establish the guilt or innocence of students who have allegedly committed such violations
  3. Recommend the disciplinary action to be taken, in all cases, in which the Honor Council determines there has been a violation
  4. Work with School of Pharmacy faculty/administration and South University administration in all matters regarding Honor Code administration

Article III- Authority

Student authority to request revision of the contents of any article in the Honor Code resides with the Honor Council.  Any revisions are subject to approval by the faculty and the Dean of the School of Pharmacy and South University administration.  Responsibility to enforce any effective penalty rendered by the Honor Council lies with the School of Pharmacy’s Assistant/Associate Dean for Academic Operations or designee.

Article IV- Membership

Section A. The Honor Council membership includes two student members from each yearly class and an at-large member selected by the faculty from the second- or third-year class. In addition, there will be two primary faculty members and two alternate faculty members one of each from the two campuses. Each faculty member will serve a twelve to twenty-four month period and will be appointed by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. An alternate member will replace a member who is unavailable, recused or removed from the Honor Council. If an alternate is chosen to permanently replace a voting member a new student alternate will be elected or a new faculty member will be appointed.

The faculty and students will provide an initial list of student nominees to the Honor Council. Faculty members will review the initial list and may strike a name without cause. Faculty will approve a final list from which students will elect two members and two alternate members from the respective classes, one of each from the Columbia campus and one of each from the Savannah campus to serve on the Honor Council. This appointment shall be made at the beginning of the second quarter for first-year members. The Honor Council will convene and select an at-large member from a list of available second- or third-year students provided by the faculty. To be a member of the honor council, one must be in good academic and professional standing. Terms of office shall last from the date of election until the member graduates, unless decided otherwise by the Honor Council. Alternates serve the Honor Council as voting members during the period from the graduation date of the graduating class until the election of Honor Council members from the incoming class.

For hearing purposes, the Honor Council will consist of five voting members, three student members including the President and Secretary of the Honor Council and a third student member randomly selected from the remaining student members and two faculty members.

Section B. The Honor Council will have two Advisors appointed by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. One will be from the Savannah Campus and the other will be from the Columbia Campus.  The Advisor will attend all meetings as non-voting Members of the Honor Council. The Advisors:

  1. Advise the Honor Council on procedural matters.
  2. Ensure that due process and equitable procedures are followed in all cases before the Honor Council and advise on matters of precedent.
  3. Inform accused students of the Honor Council’s protocol and procedures throughout the progression of a case.
  4. Once a case is accepted, notify accused students of actions, hearings, and verdicts, and serves as liaison between the Honor Council and the accused student.
  5. Provide proper notification of any Honor Council action to the appropriate administrative personnel and faculty.
  6. Ensure that appropriate documentation is completed by the Secretary for all hearings and other Honor Council meetings.
  7. Supervise and conduct investigations during the “Period of discovery”.
  8. Assign a temporary President and/or Secretary when either/both are unable to fulfill their duties.

Section C. An Honor Council member will be removed by the Advisor for failure to fulfill Honor Council-related obligations, failure to maintain good academic standing, or violation of the School’s Honor Code or the University’s Code of Conduct.

Article V- Officers

Section A. Honor Council officers shall consist of a President and a Secretary, chosen by the Honor Council members from the student members.

Section B. Officers must have completed at least three quarters of the School’s academic program or have past experience serving on a university-level Honor Council.

Section C. The Honor Council President shall:

  1. Preside over all meetings;
  2. Direct all hearing processes;
  3. Represent the Honor Council in all appropriate affairs;
  4. Supervise all case investigations;
  5. Ensure the integrity of all proceedings by strict adherence to the established Honor Council procedures; and
  6. Participate in investigations during the “Period of Discovery”.

Section D. The Honor Council Secretary shall:

  1. Maintain written minutes of all Honor Council meetings and hearings
  2. Maintain a true and accurate record, by audio recording and in writing, of all hearing proceedings
  3. Prepare written communications from the Honor Council regarding violations and Honor Council actions
  4. Prepare official written communications to the Advisor for distribution to appropriate persons regarding Honor Council actions
  5. Inform Honor Council members of all meetings through written communication
  6. Promptly communicate in writing with all persons involved in cases

Section E. Meeting time and place shall be determined by the President and shall be as convenient as possible for all concerned.  The meeting shall be held in a location where confidentiality can be ensured.

Section F. If the Honor Council must meet during regularly scheduled class time, Honor Council members shall be excused from conflicting classes and practice experiences to attend the meeting.  The affected faculty or preceptor shall be notified in advance of this excused absence by the Faculty Advisor.

Article VI - commencement of Proceedings

Section A. All persons, including faculty having knowledge of or being witness to acts believed to be in violation of the Honor Code shall report in writing the fact, along with any pertinent physical evidence, to the Faculty Advisor at the Campus where the incident occurred preferably within 72 hours of the alleged violation.  In the event the Campus Faculty Advisor is unavailable, the information shall be reported to any available Faculty Advisor.

Section B. A written statement about the violation by the witness(es) shall be required to begin the “Period of Discovery,” or investigation.

Section C. Failure to report violations will be considered a form of illegal aid covered under Article X, Section A.

Article VII - Case Procedure

Section A. Procedure for the administration of cases shall be as follows:

  1. Within 10 days of receipt of written information about a possible violation, the President of the Honor Council or designee and Faculty Advisor shall act as individuals responsible for conducting the “Period of discovery” to interview witnesses, review evidence, and make a decision regarding whether or not to bring the case before the entire Honor Council. 
  2. The Period of Discovery determines if there is sufficient evidence to proceed with a hearing. In the event of insufficient evidence, the case will be dropped and documents destroyed. If there is sufficient evidence, the case will be presented to the Honor Council and a hearing is scheduled.
  3. If the case is accepted, the Secretary or the Advisor will promptly notify the accused of the relevant charges and of the Honor Council’s intention to conduct a full Hearing of the case. At this time, the defendant shall be fully informed orally and in writing of the nature of the charges. The accused will be informed that if he/she chooses not to be present for the hearing, the case will be heard in his/her absence. The accused shall be given a copy of the violation and written notice of his/her rights to appear before the Honor Council, to testify on his/her own behalf, to present evidence and to call or question witnesses. If the Honor Council is using the accuser’s testimony in determining the guilt or innocence of the accused, the student has the right to confront the accuser.  The accused may at any time waive the right to a full hearing by entering a plea of guilty to the charges and proceed directly to the penalty phase.
  4.  All persons involved shall promptly receive notification (oral or written) to attend a hearing. The person bringing the incident report and the accused student(s) shall receive written notification of the hearing.  The Secretary and/or the Honor Council Advisor shall provide this notification. Each individual shall be bound not to reveal the details of any alleged violation of the Honor Code. Disclosure by any participant about the case will be an Honor Code violation.

Article VIII - Hearing Procedures

Section A. Honor Council hearings are closed and all witnesses will be interviewed separately. The accused and accuser will be present for all presentations of evidence and witness testimony, provided that his or her behavior is not disruptive or threatening.

Note: In the rare event that a student or faculty member is unable to physically attend the Honor Council proceedings in person, he/she will be required to swear or affirm for the record the fact that no one else is in the same room or able to hear the proceedings during the hearing and that no audio/video recordings are being made of the hearing.

Section B. The procedure for conducting a hearing shall be as follows:

  1. Following a formal reading of the charges, the defendant is required to enter a plea before testimony is heard.
  2. Each person giving testimony will be required to testify under oath.
  3. Should a witness prove unable to comment on specific, direct details of the case, he/she will be removed from the hearing. The Advisor or President shall determine a witness’ ability to meet this standard.
  4. The Honor Council may allow the introduction of evidence other than witness testimony if the Honor Council President and Advisor determine that the evidence is relevant.
  5. The Honor Council shall record in writing and on audio recording media hearing proceedings
  6. After hearing all testimony and reviewing all relevant evidence, all non-Honor Council members will be excused for the Honor Council deliberation
  7. The Honor Council shall vote by secret ballot “Guilty” or “Not Guilty” with the outcome determined by simple majority.
    1. In cases where the accused student is found “not guilty”, all transcripts, except de-identified minutes, and recorded media shall be destroyed or deleted immediately. De-identified minutes shall be filed in a closed file that is maintained in School of Pharmacy’s vault under the oversight of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy.
    2. In cases where the accused student is found  “guilty”, hearing transcripts and recorded media shall be filed in a closed file that is maintained in School of Pharmacy’s vault under the oversight of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. The office of the Dean shall maintain these files for a period of 5 years after which time the files will be properly destroyed.

Article IX -

Honor Code Violations

Section A.  The following are Honor Code violations and provide the basis for reporting cases to the Honor Council and for convictions by the Honor Council:

  1. Cheating on academic work.  Examples may include, but are not limited  to the following:
  • Copying, giving the appearance of copying, or attempting to copy from another student’s exam, paper or other assignment/activity (this definition expressly includes looking at another student’s test or academic work in any academic context [classroom, lab, clinical] where the instructor has not specifically allowed that action)
  • Giving or receiving, or otherwise using unauthorized assistance in connection with any examination, work submitted by the student for credit, or work performed as a required element of a course or clinical experience
  • Using/attempting to use any unauthorized material, aid or device prior to or during a test
  • Using, buying, selling, stealing, transporting or soliciting, in whole or in part or the attempt to use, buy, sell, steal, transport or solicit the contents of an un-administered test that is expected to be administered
  • Obtaining, or attempting to physically or electronically obtain a test, without authorization prior to administration, or attempting to obtained unauthorized or reserved information about a test prior to administration
  • Obtaining, replicating or attempting to replicate (orally, manually, electronically, or photographically), without authorization, an administered secure examination, which has been designated for viewing only
  • Substituting for another student, or permitting another student to substitute for oneself, to take a test or to fulfill any required element of a course or clinical experience
  • Plagiarizing or appropriating an author’s work and the unacknowledged incorporation of that work in one’s written work, offered for credit or otherwise submitted or performed as a required element of a course or clinic
  • Other
  1. Committing an intentional act of lying, cheating or stealing
  2. Providing incorrect information to another persona about any matter with the intent to harm another student’s academic performance
  3. Obstructing another student’s attempts to engage in academic activities with the intent to harm another student’s academic performance
  4. Intentionally making a material misrepresentation of the student’s class rank, grade point average, or any other academic achievement or endeavor
  5. Recklessly placing anyone at increased risk of injury or disease while the student in engaged in activities directly connected with patient care or academic activities
  6. Recklessly, and without prior authorization from the patient, disclosing information about a patient, along with information suggesting the identity of that patient, to a person who is not, at the time of the disclosure, a member of the patient’s health care team
  7. Intentionally making a false report of an Honor Code violation
  8. Intentionally obstructing the investigation of the prosecution of an alleged Honor Code violation, including, but not limited to, giving false information or testimony and destroying, hiding, or fabricating evidence in any full or preliminary Honor Council proceeding
  9. Fabrication, which is defined as the falsification, or invention, of any information, data, or citation in an academic exercise
  10. Forgery, alteration, destruction, or misuse of School documents, medical records, prescriptions, physician’s excuse, etc.
  11. Tampering with the election of any School recognized student organization
  12. Conspiring, planning, or attempting to achieve any of the above acts
  13. Knowingly failing to report to a proper authority another student whom the student knows committed acts proscribed in this Article IX

Any student who knowingly or intentionally provides illegal aid shall be considered as responsible as the student who receives it and will be dealt with by the Honor Council in the appropriate manner.

Article X - Penalties

 

Section A. The standard penalty for violation of the Honor Code is permanent expulsion.  The student will receive a grade of Withdrawal Failing for all courses in which he/she is enrolled at the time of the infraction.  Depending on the circumstances of the case, the Honor Council may assign a penalty less severe than permanent expulsion.  These penalties include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Suspension: The student will be suspended from South University for approximately one year and may petition for readmission two quarters before the start of the curricular term within which the courses in which the violation occurred is next scheduled.
    1. The student will receive a grade of Failing (0.0) for the course within which the violation occurred, and a grade of Withdrawal for other courses enrolled in at the time of the infraction.
    2. The student may be required to enroll as a student in special standing prior to re-enrollment as a full-time student

Section B. Confidentiality and Notification

  1. The only individuals who will be informed of an investigation of the Honor Council will be the honor council members, the accused, the accuser(s), the witness(es), and the appropriate Assistant or Associate Dean or designee.
  2. Appropriate Faculty will be informed of Honor Council activity according to trial outcome. In case of “not guilty” verdict, faculty notified are:  the appropriate Assistant or Associate Dean or designee and the faculty accuser(s).
  3. The Honor Council Advisor shall notify (oral or written) the defendant of the judgment of the Honor Council. Findings shall be emailed or delivered to the defendant within 3 calendar days of a Honor Council judgment.
  4. The Assistant or Associate Dean or designee will be informed promptly in writing by the Honor Council Faculty Advisor following the Honor Council’s decision, who will communicate the penalty decision to South University Administration, as appropriate.

Section C. Students found guilty of an Honor Code violation may appeal a guilty verdict and/or the penalty associated with that verdict to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy or designee. The defendant should submit a written request for appeal within seven days of the Honor Council rendering a verdict and penalty. The Dean or designee may uphold, amend, or negate the Honor Council’s recommendation following due consideration of the appeal. This decision is final and will be rendered in writing within 14 days following the appeal request.  Appropriate South University administrators will be notified of the appeal and the final decision.

Article XI - Amendment

Section A. Amendments to the present policy and procedures may be proposed by the Honor Council, by Class Officers representing their respective student body, or by Faculty members. Such proposals shall be forwarded to the faculty for approval at a South University School of Pharmacy faculty meeting.

Section B. Faculty approved amendments become effective upon final ratification by the University Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs.

Undergraduate Academic Integrity Policy

South University Honor Code

While I attend South University, I will be a fair and honorable student, and will promote fair and honorable conduct in others.  I will not cheat, and I will not help others to cheat.   I will do my own work, and give proper and truthful reference to those whose work has contributed any amount of content to mine.

Academic Integrity

South University defines academic integrity as the complete, accurate, specific, and truthful representation of authorship, origin of ideas, mastery of material, and data, including access to and authorized use of resources.

The demonstration of academic integrity typically falls into four broad categories:
  • Mastery of material.  Students are responsible for the truthful representation of their mastery of material on tests or other academic exercises.
  • Representation of sources.  Students are responsible for the complete, accurate, specific, and truthful acknowledgement of the work of others, including, but not limited to, their words, ideas, phrases, sentences, or data.
  • Truthful submission of work.  Students are responsible for the truthful representation of data or other findings, projects, or other academic exercise.
  • Access and use of resources.  Students are responsible for ensuring that their access and use of resources complies with South University policies.
Academic Dishonesty

Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy typically fall into the following categories:  Cheating, Plagiarism, Fabrication, Sabotage and Academic Misconduct.  Violations of academic integrity must be reported by faculty and administrators. Students should report violations of academic integrity.  To aid understanding of what constitutes academic dishonesty and violoations of academic integrity the following definitions are provided:

Violations of Academic Integrity Policy
  • Plagiarism. Plagiarism occurs when a person represents someone else’s work, ideas, phrases, sentences, or data as one’s own work.
  • Self-plagiarism. Submitting identical or very similar work for more than one course without receiving permission from the current faculty member prior to submission.
  • Cheating. Receiving unauthorized assistance or help on tests/examinations or other academic work. 
  • Collusion. Unauthorized collaboration with others for work offered as credit.
  • Fabrication. Inventing or falsifying information or data.
  • Academic Misconduct. Includes the alteration of grades, involvement in the acquisition or distribution of un-administered tests.
  • Sabotage.  The willful attempt to hinder another student’s work.
Classification of Academic Integrity Violations and Possible Penalties

Violations of academic integrity are classified based on the level of seriousness.  Brief descriptions, examples, and recommended penalties are provided below.  These are general descriptions and should not be considered as all-inclusive.

Level One Warning:

Level One warnings consist of an instance when, in the opinion of the faculty member, the student’s actions were not intentional.  A Level One warning is considered an academic issue and not a disciplinary offense.  However, all incidents of Level One warning will be recorded in the student’s academic record.

Examples of Level One Warnings include, but are not limited to:

Plagiarism

  • Improper citation or referencing resulting from unintentional misrepresentation of a citation
  • Citation of information not taken from the source indicated

Penalty:  Resubmission of the assignment with corrections for partial credit.

Level Two Violation:

Level Two violations consist of an instance when, in the opinion of the faculty member, one or more of the following conditions exists:

  • The student’s actions constitute a violation of academic integrity that cannot be dismissed as likely the result of inexperience.
  • The student has previously committed a Level One warning and has repeated the infraction.

Examples of Level Two Violations include, but are not limited to:

Cheating

  • Unauthorized assistance with academic work
  • Allowing another student to copy one’s work
  • Copying from another student’s work
  • Using unauthorized materials such as a textbook or notebook during an examination

Plagiarism

  • Quoting another person’s words directly without acknowledging the source
  • Using another’s ideas, opinions or theories even if they have been completely paraphrased in one’s own words without acknowledging the source
  • Using facts, statistics or other illustrative material taken from a source without acknowledging the source, unless the information is common knowledge
  • Submitting a computer program, or any other creative work or intellectual property as defined by the discipline, as original work which duplicates, in whole or in part, without citation, the work of another

Fabrication

  • Listing of sources in a bibliography or other report not used in that project

Self-plagarism

  • Submitting identical or very similar work for more than one course without receiving permission from the current faculty member prior to submission.

Recommended Penalty:  A failing grade on the assignment.

Level Three Violation:

Level Three violations consist of an instance when, in the opinion of the instructor, one or more of the following conditions exists.

The student’s actions are a repeat offense of a Level Two violation.
The student’s actions are initial offenses of academic misconduct of a more serious nature than a Level Two Violation.

Examples of Level Three Violation include, but are not limited to:

Cheating

  • Using unauthorized materials such as a textbook or notebook or Internet-based information during an examination
  • Collaborating with another person during an exam by giving or receiving information without permission from the faculty member
  • Unauthorized access to or use of someone else’s computer account or computer files for any purpose.

Plagiarism

  • Obtaining a term paper from another student or company and/or obtaining essays or assignments from the Internet and submitting it as your own. A violation can occur whether the content is purchased or obtained free-of charge.

Self-plagiarism

  • Multiple submissions of work to fulfill the requirements of more than one course without the explicit permission of the present faculty member.

Collusion

  • Submission as one’s own  orany academic work prepared in whole or in part by others, unless the assignment is designed for student collaboration.

Fabrication

  • Fabricating data or source information in experiments, research projects, or other academic exercises.

Academic Misconduct

  • Altering graded test answers and then claiming faculty member inappropriately scored the examination

Sabotage

  • Intentionally revising another’s written work
  • Intentionally keeping necessary resources, such as library books or articles, from another.

Collusion

  • Purchasing of a term paper from another student or company.
  • Submitting of work previously submitted for another course without the prior permission of the faculty member.

Recommended Penalty:  Probation or suspension from the University with a notation of “disciplinary suspension” placed in a student’s academic file and a failing grade in the course. Note that suspension from PLUS courses is also suspension from campus-based courses.

Students may apply for re-entry at the end of the suspension period. No appeal is required.

Level Four Violation:

Level four violations are the most serious breaches of academic integrity. Level Four violations occur when, in the opinion of the faculty member, one or more of the following conditions exist.

  • The student’s actions are a repeat offense of a Level Three violation
  • The student’s actions are initial offenses of academic misconduct of a more serious nature than a Level Three violation
  • The student’s actions represent any degree of infraction relating to a senior thesis
  • The student’s actions involve academic dishonesty committed after return from suspension for a previous violation or while on probation from a previous violation.

Examples of Level Four Violations include, but are not limited to:

Plagiarism

  • Obtaining multiple assignments from someone else or from the Internet and submitting them as your own. A violation can occur whether the content is purchased or obtained free-of-charge.

Fabrication

Multiple incidents of fabricating data or source information in experiments, research project or other academic exercises

Academic Misconduct

  • Changing, altering, falsifying or being accessory to  the changing, altering or falsifying of a grade report or form, or entering any university office, building or accessing a computer for that purpose
  • Coercing any other person to obtain an un-administered test
  • Stealing, buying, selling, giving away or otherwise obtaining all or part of any un-administered test/examination or term papers or works of art, or entering any university office or building for the purpose of obtaining said materials without authorization
  • Creating illegal accounts, changing of files or securing of passwords illegally
  • Destroying computer accounts without authorization
  • Violation of the clinical or ethical code of a profession

Sabotage

  • Intentionally revising another’s written work intentionally keeping necessary resources, such as library books or articles, from another.

Collusion

  • Multiple submissions as one’s own, any academic work prepared in whole or in part by others, unless the assignment allows students to work collaboratively.
  • Misrepresentation (or falsification) of digital identity to complete all assignments within a course.
  • Purchasing of a term paper from another student or company.
  • Submitting of work previously submitted for another course without the prior permission of the faculty member.
  • Substituting for another student or permitting any other person to substitute for oneself to take a test or examination

Recommended Penalty: Expulsion from the University and a permanent dismissal notation on the student’s academic file.

Procedures for Infractions

Violations of the University’s academic integrity policy require completion of the Academic Integrity Violation Report (AIVR). The AIVR report must be submitted to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations, with copies to Program Chairs/Program Directors and Dean of Student Affairs.  The burden of proof shall be upon the faculty member bringing the charges to prove the case.  All faculty are expected to keep thorough records and documentation with copies of the work submitted.

In the case of Level One warnings or Level Two violations, the faculty member will meet with the student to outline the charge, including the level of violation and penalty. The penalty imposed by an faculty member must be recorded on the AIVR and forwarded to the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations, with copies to the Program Chair/Program Director and Dean of Student Affairs.

All student/faculty member conferences regarding Level Three and Four violations will be informational only. Therefore it is not appropriate for these sessions to consider appeals at this time. The Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations will determine the penalty.

Procedures for Infractions Involving Online Courses

If the faculty member suspects a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy, they will first meet with the student to discuss the incident.  The incident report and supporting documentation, such as the student’s assignment and information on the sources in question will be used to determine the severity or level of the violation.   The number of previous violations committed will also be taken into consideration.  

Upon receiving confirmation on the level of the incident, the faculty member will notify the student and complete the assignment grading.  Depending on the level of the incident, further actions may be taken by the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations (for campus-based students) or the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs-Online (for online students). 

Appealing an Academic Integrity Violation Charge

Students are encouraged to attempt to resolve any academic issues with their faculty member. When that process has been exhausted the student may appeal to the next levels.  Once a penalty has been imposed, the student may accept the penalty, or they must file a written appeal.  

All written appeals must be filed within fourteen (14) calendar days once the penalty has been imposed. Failure to meet this deadline will render the appeal moot.  Should an Academic Integrity Violation charge be made at the end of a quarter, a grade of “I” will be assigned until the violation has been processed.  It is the responsibility of the student then to appeal any adverse decision to the next level, again within fourteen (14) calendar days.  The next level in the appeal process will not automatically consider it unless the student appeals it in writing and within the fourteen (14) calendar days.

Any written appeal by the student must be filed within the specified period of time and include:

  • A clear statement of the nature and reason(s) of the appeal.
  • A clear concise statement of the material facts, with appropriate supporting documentation.
 Appeal of Academic Integrity Violation Charge or Penalty Imposed for Campus-based Students

For Level One warnings and Level Two Violations:

  • Student should file a written grade appeal through their Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations who will forward to the appropriate individual. 
  • First level of appeal is to the Program Director or Program Chair, whichever is located on the student’s campus. For campus-based students who are enrolled in an online course, the first level of appeal is to the online Program Director
  • Second level of appeal is to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations at the South University campus where the student is enrolled.
  • The third and final level of appeal is to the College/School Dean.  The decision of the College/School Dean is final.

For Level Three and Level Four Violations:

  • First level of appeal is to the College/School Dean.
  • Second level of appeal is the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs. The decision of the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs is final.

Any written appeal by the student must be filed within the specified period of time and include:

  • a clear statement of the nature and reason(s) of the appeal
  • a clear concise statement of the material facts, with appropriate supporting documentation

Appeal of Academic Integrity Violation Charge or Penalty Imposed for Students in an Online Program

Level One warnings and Level Two violations:

  • Student should file a written grade appeal through their Academic Counselor to be reviewed by the Program Director/Chair or his/her designee.
  • Second level of appeal is to the Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs-Online.
  • The third and final level of appeal is to the College/School Dean.  The decision of the College/School Dean is final.

For Level Three and Level Four Violations:

  • First level of appeal is to the College/School Dean.
  • Second level of appeal is the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs. The decision of the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs is final.

Attorneys, Parents or Guardians:  As this is an academic process of South University, no official or unofficial legal representation will be allowed to attend any of the identified proceedings.

Students may invite parents/guardians to attend any meetings with university personnel during the appeal process but their presence is strictly to observe the proceedings and advise the student.  They are otherwise not to participate.

The Academic Integrity Violations form and all documentation related to the incident remains in the student’s academic file.

Anesthesiologist Assistant Code of Conduct

Professional Standards

Standards of professional behavior for the anesthesiologist assistant (AA) covers professional behavior, standards for attire, attendance, and completion and maintenance of records documenting clinical education (Typhon NAST case & time logs)

Standards for Professional Behavior

The South University Anesthesiologist Assistant (AA) program recognizes and upholds the standards of professional behavior for students of the program as outlined by the American Academy of Anesthesiologist Assistants (AAAA, GUIDELINES FOR THE ETHICAL STANDARDS OF THE ANESTHESIOLOGIST ASSISTANT, Adopted July 2007, accessed at https://aaaa.memberclicks.net/assets/docs/position%20statement%20-%20guidelines_for_the_ethical_standards_of_the_anesthesiologist_assistant.pdf). 

These standards state:

The Anesthesiologist assistant is expected to act both legally and morally. They are responsible for knowing and understanding the laws governing their practice and the ethical responsibilities of being a health care professional.

The practice of anesthesiology involves many complex factors relating to the standards of patient care. As such, the Academy recommends its members adhere to the basic set of ethical standards outlined below:

  1. The Anesthesiologist Assistant shall, while caring for the patient, regard responsibility to the patient as paramount, thereby putting the interests of the patient foremost and acting as a patient advocate.
  2. The Anesthesiologist Assistant shall be dedicated to providing competent medical care with compassion and respect for human dignity.
  3. The Anesthesiologist Assistant shall maintain standards of professionalism in all patient interactions and always acting in the best interests of the patient.
  4. The Anesthesiologist Assistant shall respect the law.
  5. The Anesthesiologist Assistant shall respect the rights of the patients under their care, colleagues and other health care professionals with whom they interact and shall safeguard the confidentiality of patients’ medical and personal information within the constraints of the law.
  6. The Anesthesiologist Assistant shall uphold the right of every patient to the ethical right to self-determination, and therefore not coerce any portion of the decision-making process and shall facilitate the informed consent process. Anesthesiologist Assistants shall be committed to the concept of shared decision-making, which involves assisting patients in making decisions that account for medical, situational, and personal factors.
  7. Anesthesiologist Assistants shall have the inherent responsibility to observe and report any potentially negligent practices or conditions which compromise patient safety or present a hazard to health care facility personnel.
  8. Anesthesiologist Assistants render high-quality patient care without prejudice as to race, religion, age, sex, nationality, disability, social, economic, or insurance status.
  9. Anesthesiologist Assistants should not misrepresent, directly or indirectly, their skills, training, professional credentials, title, or identity.
  10. Anesthesiologist Assistants shall strive to maintain a spirit of cooperation with other health care professionals, their organizations, and the general public.

In the practice of anesthesia, the safety and well-being of patients is every practitioner’s first and foremost concern. The confidential acquisition and maintenance of patient data are also of paramount importance. Inappropriate behavior and/or failure to maintain patient data in an appropriate, confidential manner according to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) guidelines are grounds for immediate review and for possible dismissal.

Professionalism Warning

A student’s professionalism may be reviewed at any time, based on information received by the Program Director. The Program Director shall take appropriate action based on the type and severity of the student’s misconduct.  If the infraction involves a student violation of the University Code of Conduct, the matter will be referred to the Dean of Student Affairs.  Violations of the Graduate Honor Code will be referred to the Graduate Honor Council.  Students who breach the standards of professionalism for the Anesthesiologist Assistant program will be referred to the Progress and Promotions Committee.

The Program Director will inform the student of the program’s receipt of unsatisfactory evaluation or referral of professionalism violation.

Students will be placed on warning for any violation of the Professionalism standards of the Anesthesiologist Assistant Program. Acts that would garner a warning status for the student’s enrollment include (but are not limited to):

  • A breach the Anesthesiologist Assistant program standards in the following areas:
    • Professional behavior
    • Attire
    • Attendance
      • Accumulation of more than two unexcused absences
    • Completion of clinical records/Case/Time log tracking as outlined in this handbook
  • Breach of patient confidentiality rules (HIPAA)
  • Other serious violations of Professionalism standards for an Anesthesiologist Assistant student

The Progress and Promotions Committee, after review of the Professionalism issue recommends the action to be taken by the Program Director. The Program Director’s decision for student progress can be any one of the following based on student performance and their previous enrollment status (previous warning or probation)

  • Continuation in good standing
  • Continuation on Clinical warning
  • Continuation on Clinical probation (following successful appeal of a Professionalism dismissal)
  • Dismissal

A student placed on Professionalism warning will remain on warning for the entire quarter.  Students who are on warning must participate in a Professionalism reinstatement plan if they wish to continue their enrollment in the Anesthesiologist Assistant Program.  At the end of the warning period, the student’s professional performance will be evaluated by the Progress and Promotions Committee who will recommend to the Program Director what action can be taken based on their progress to meet the Professionalism reinstatement plan and other standards of the program.

Standards for Academic Performance

Anesthesiologist Assistant Programmatic Standards for Academic performance for students enrolled in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Science program include:

  • Receipt of no more than one course grade of  “D”
  • Receipt of no course grades of “F”
  • Receipt of a grade of “D” or lower for any course remediation assignment or comprehensive exam remediation
Anesthesiologist Assistant (AA) Program Academic Performance Warning

Anesthesiologist Assistant program students who do not meet any of the above programmatic standards for academic performance will be referred to the Progress and Promotions Committee for a violation of the AA Program Academic Performance Standards. 

After attempting each subsequent quarter, a student in the Anesthesiologist Assistant program who does not achieve these minimum standards for Academic Performance for the AA program will be placed on AA Program Academic Performance warning.  If a student who is already on programmatic warning of any type (Academic, Professionalism or Clinical) fails to achieve the minimum standards of performance in any of the three areas (Academic, Clinical or Professionalism) s/he will be dismissed from the Anesthesiologist Assistant program.

The Progress and Promotions Committee, after review of violation of the standards for AA Program Academic Performance, recommends the action to be taken to the Program Director. The Program Director’s decision for student progress can be any one of the following based on student performance and their previous enrollment status (previous warning or probation)

  • Continuation in good standing
  • Continuation on Programmatic Academic warning
  • Continuation on Programmatic Academic Probation (following successful appeal of a AA program performance dismissal)
  • Dismissal

Students who do not meet these standards will be placed on Programmatic Academic Warning for the following quarter.  During that quarter on warning, students must participate in a programmatic academic reinstatement plan if they wish to continue their enrollment in the AA program.  At the end of the warning period, the student’s academic performance will be evaluated by the Progress and Promotions Committee who will recommend to the Program Director what action can be taken based on their progress to meet the AA programmatic academic reinstatement plan and other standards of the program.

Remediation

Students who receive a grade of D in any course must engage in remediation for that course during the subsequent quarter.  Remediation work includes a written assignment from the course instructor/coordinator and an exam highlighting the course objectives.  Students must receive a minimum grade of C on the combined grades from the written remedial assignment and exam or they will be placed on AA program academic performance warning.

Clinical Performance Standards

Performance during clinical education is based on preceptor evaluations and feedback.  Daily clinical evaluations track student performance and skill progression over the course of the program.  The student is responsible to complete their case and time logs daily using the Typhon system so that the program can distribute evaluations to preceptors.

Assessment of students is based on the minimal levels of competency at each distinct level of training.  Any violation of these standards will result in referral of the student to the program Progress & Promotions Committee. 

Standards of Clinical performance

  • Clinical competency

Quarterly analysis of preceptor evaluations

  • Student’s averaged scores in the majority of these areas of assessment should be within 2 standard deviations of the class mean.
    • Areas of assessment include but are not limited to:
      • Anesthesia knowledge base
      • Technical skills
      • Ability to multi-task
      • Problem solving ability
      • Pre-operative preparation for anesthesia delivery
      • Post-operative transfer/report
      • Desire to learn
      • Patient interaction
      • Professional Conduct
      • Overall Performance
  • Preceptor Feedback
    • Feedback from preceptors from any source: phone, email, written correspondence should indicate that the student is meeting the minimum competencies. 
  • Clinical Experiences
    • The table below lists the case log requirements and recommendations for students to successfully complete the clinical education portion of the Anesthesiologist Assistant Program.  Students are responsible for fulfilling the requirements prior to graduation and tracking their progress using data in the Typhon NAST system.  Students need to reference this table for Anesthesiologist Assistant requirements.

Requirements may be altered or waived in extenuating circumstances by the program director.  All case log data is gathered from the Typhon NAST tracking system.

Clinical Experiences for South University Anesthesiologist Assistant students

Clinical Experiences Requirements Minimum
Composite Requirements Total Anesthesia Cases 600 cases
Total Hours Anesthesia Time - Time log totals 2000 hours
Class III/IV 150 cases
Class V 0 cases
Specialties 65+ 100 cases
2-12 years 40 cases
< 2 years 10 cases
Emergent cases 20 cases
Ambulatory/ Outpatient 100 cases
Obstetric cases 35 cases
Anatomical Categories Intra-abdominal 75 cases
Head Extracranial (Ear, Nose, and Throat) 20 cases
Head Intracranial 5 cases
Intrathoracic Heart (5 required, 10 recommended) 5 cases
Intrathoracic Lung 10 cases
Vascular 15 cases
Methods of Anesthesia General Anesthesia 400 cases
Inhalational Induction 35 cases
Laryngeal Mask Airway 35 procedures
Endotracheal Intubation-Oral 250 procedures
Endotracheal Intubation-Nasal 5 procedures
Total IV Anesthetics 10 cases
Emergence from Anesthesia 250 cases
Regional Management 40 cases
Monitored Anesthesia Care 30 cases
Arterial Technique Insertion 15 procedures
Monitoring 25 procedures
CVP Catheter Placement (Recommended) 5 procedures
Monitoring (Recommended) 10 procedures
Other IV Catheter Placement 75 procedures
Alternate Airway Management 20 procedures

 

Clinical Warning

Students who meet any of the following criteria, indicating that they are performing below a minimum level of clinical competency will be presented to the Progress and Promotions Committee for consideration.

  • Inadequate clinical performance as measured by analysis of preceptor evaluations.  Composite quarterly scores of clinical performance that are ≥ 2 standard deviations below the class mean in a majority of the areas of competency assessed.
  • Negative feedback received by program, based on multiple incidences from verbal or written sources from preceptors at the student’s clinical site
  • Students who do not complete a clinical rotation or are asked to leave a clinical rotation due to poor performance
  • Inadequate completion of recommended clinical education experiences listed in the table above

The Progress and Promotions Committee, after review of the Clinical performance issue recommends the action to be taken by the Program Director. The Program Director’s decision for student progress can be any one of the following based on student performance and their previous enrollment status (previous warning or probation)

  • Continuation in good standing
  • Continuation on Clinical warning
  • Continuation on Clinical probation (following successful appeal of a Clinical dismissal)
  • Dismissal

A student placed on Clinical warning will remain on warning for the following quarter to demonstrate improvement.  Students who are on warning must participate in a Clinical reinstatement plan if they wish to continue their enrollment in the Anesthesiologist Assistant program.  At the end of the warning period, the student’s clinical performance will be evaluated by the Progress and Promotions Committee who will recommend to the Program Director what action can be taken based on their progress to meet the Clinical reinstatement plan and other standards of the Anesthesiologist Assistant program Academic Performance Warning.

Dismissal

Students may be dismissed from the Anesthesiologist Assistant program for any of the following reasons:

  • Failing to emerge from academic/financial aid warning, clinical warning or professionalism warning status in a subsequent quarter
  • Two cumulative quarters on warning for any cause (clinical, academic/financial aid, professionalism) during the student’s enrollment
  • Failing to successfully complete the academic/clinical/professionalism reinstatement plan 
  • One letter grade of F and two or more letter grades of D in one quarter
  • Severe transgressions of ethical and moral conduct (Including but not limited to:  violation of the honor code, stealing, or providing false documentation intended to deceive faculty or administration)
  • Positive test result for drug or alcohol use
  • A recommendation from the Dean of Student Affairs for violation of the University Code of Conduct
  • A recommendation for dismissal by the Graduate Honor Council for Honor Code violation

A student may not attempt more than 150% of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150% of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the maximum allowable timeframe.

Appeal Process

To appeal an academic/financial aid dismissal:

Students who receive an academic/financial aid dismissal and wish to appeal should refer to the South University Catalog for the guidelines of appeal.  The section of the catalog that should be reference is entitled:  Procedures for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.  The catalog also outlines the policies and procedures for reinstatement after an academic/financial aid dismissal. 

To Appeal an Anesthesiologist Assistant Program Academic, Professional or Clinical dismissal:

To appeal an Anesthesiologist Assistant program Academic, Professional or Clinical dismissal by the Anesthesiologist Assistant Program, the student must submit a letter to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations within 5 business days (by 5 PM) of receipt of the dismissal letter.  The appeal letter should outline the reasons that they are seeking this appeal for Anesthesiologist Assistant Program Academic, Professionalism or Clinical  standards violation, how they plan to correct their behavior and why the appeal should be granted from the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations.  The student may include a petition to meet with the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations.

If the dismissal decision is upheld by the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations, the student may appeal to the Dean of College of Health Professions.  The letter must include the reason for the appeal and be received within 5 business days (by 5 PM) of the receipt of the previous decision by the Dean of Academic Affairs.

If the dismissal decision is upheld by the Dean of College of Health Professions, the student may appeal to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. The letter of appeal must include the reason for appeal and be received within 5 business days (by 5 PM) of receipt of the previous decision. The decision of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is final.

Reinstatement after Clinical, Professionalism, or Programmatic Academic dismissal

If a student is reinstated following a successful appeal of an Anesthesiologist Assistant Program Academic, Professional or Clinical dismissal, they will be placed on Clinical or Professional probation at the start of the quarter in which s/he resumes coursework.

The student will be required to meet with the Program Director to discuss an Anesthesiologist Assistant Program Academic, Clinical or Professionalism reinstatement plan to outline expectations and performance requirements for continued enrollment in the Anesthesiologist Assistant Program. The program director and the Progress and Promotions Committee will continue to assess the student’s progress under the plan during the quarter of probation. If a student successfully completes the probationary period plan as judged by the Program Director in consultation with the Progress and Promotion Committee, that student will be recommended to continue in the program in good standing.  Students who do not successfully complete the requirements of the reinstatement plan during the probationary period will be recommended for dismissal.

Personal Use of Electronic Devices

Students are not allowed to use individual electronic devices for personal reasons during clinical education.  Use of such devices may be allowed for educational purposes only if approved by the student’s direct clinical supervisor.  Violation of this policy is considered a breach of the Professional Standards of the Anesthesiologist Assistant program and if such a violation occurs, that student will be referred to the Progress and Promotions committee.

Experiential Learning

No course credit is awarded for experiential learning to applicants of the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Science program.

Master of Science in Physician Assistant Code of Conduct

Conduct

The South University Student Handbook defines a Code of Conduct that must be followed by all students. Failure to comply with general University policies may result in dismissal from the program and the University according to defined disciplinary procedures enforced by the Dean of Student Affairs. All disciplinary actions will be reported to the Progress Committee and will be considered relative to the student’s suitability for continued participation in the program and entry into the Physician Assistant profession. Each student shall be attired appropriately whenever he/she is in a clinical (patient care) environment. Failure to adhere to appropriate guidelines for attire can result in dismissal from clinical activity with a resulting penalty applied for absence. In the belief that physicians and PA’s are called to the highest standards of honor and professional conduct and understanding that this responsibility begins at the inception of one’s medical education rather than upon receipt of degree, the students of the South University master of Science in Physician Assistant degree program must uphold the following standards that serve as an embodiment of the conduct and integrity to which they aspire. These standards are intended to promote an atmosphere of honesty, trust, and cooperation among the students, the faculty, their patients, and society. Students in the South University Master of Science in Physician Assistant degree program are expected to demonstrate behavior that is considered appropriate for a career in medicine. Appropriate behavior includes, but is not in any way limited to honesty, trustworthiness, professional demeanor, respect for the rights of others, personal accountability, and concern for the welfare of patients -all of which are outlined below. Violations of these Standards of Professionalism may result in disciplinary proceedings.  For more information on policies and expectations on PA student conduct see the PA program Student Handbook

South University publishes its Graduate Honor Code in the South University Student Handbook and Catalog.  All students enrolled in the South University Physician Assistant program are expected to abide by this code. 

Alleged violations of the South University Graduate Honor Code will be referred to the Physician Assistant Program’s Progress Committee for review.  If the Progress Committee determines that there is adequate evidence of an Honor Code violation, the case will be referred to the South University Graduate Honor Council.  Above and beyond the Graduate Honor Council decisions, the Progress Committee has the authority to add additional sanctions and/or remediation.

Grading

The following letter grades, their indication of performance, and assigned quality points are used in the program:

A          Excellent 4
B Above Average     3
C Average 2
D Below Average
(This is a marginal grade for which the student may be required to perform remedial work or repeat the course at the discretion of the Progress and Promotions Committee)
1
F Failing
(no course credit or resident credit.)
0
WF Withdraw/Failure
(no course credit or resident credit. Course credit, No quality points restricted to certain courses.)
0
NCF Non Completion Failure 0
LP Limited Progress 0
WV Waiver for a course: does not affect ICR?MTF/CGPA, does not count as an attempt for programmatic progression 0
WX Withdrawal, never attended but registered (no course credit or residence credit) 0
P Pass credit no quality points
(restricted to certain courses)
0
I Incomplete 0

Grades or symbols of  “D,” “F,”  “W,” “WP,” “WF,” “NCF” and “LP” can negatively affect one or more of the following and should be considered punitive in terms of a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP):  Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), Incremental Completion Rate (ICR) or Maximum Allowable Timeframe (MTF).  A grade of “C” may also be punitive in certain graduate and professional program courses requiring a grade of “B” or higher.  Refer to the catalog section on “Explanations of Related Issues” for additional information on calculation of CGPA, ICR, and MTF.

The notation “P” indicates a passing score in a course designated as Pass/Fail (P/F). A student receives credit hours for a P/F course, but there are no quality points assigned and a passing grade does not contribute to the student’s grade point average. The notation “I” for incomplete will be submitted when assigned work has not been completed. If the work is not completed by the end of the second week of the subsequent academic quarter, a final grade of F will be assigned.

College of Nursing and Public Health Code of Conduct

(applies to all Nursing programs)

Students are held accountable for the knowledge of and adherence to policies addressed in the South University Student Handbook and the South University Nursing Student Handbook. Failure to comply with said policies will result in a report being filed with the Dean of Student Affairs.

A violation of the South University Code of Conduct, the Nursing Program Code of Ethics, the Code of Academic and Clinical Conduct of the National Student Nurses’ Association, or the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of Ethics may result in dismissal from the nursing program. Students will be afforded due process, as specified in the South University disciplinary procedure.

PROGRAM DISMISSAL

A student may be subject to dismissal from the South University Nursing Program due to the following conditions:

  1. Breach of academic integrity
  2. Dismissal from a clinical affiliation due to legal or ethical practice violations.  
  3. Violation of the South University Code of Conduct, the Nursing Program Code of Ethics, the Code of Academic and Clinical Conduct of the National Student Nurses’ Association, or the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of Ethics.
  4. Transgressions of ethical and moral conduct, including but not limited to, violation of the honor code, theft, falsification of documentation, or alteration of documents.
  5. Dismissal from the university due to disciplinary violations per the South University Code of Conduct as stated in the South University Student Handbook.
  6. Failure to maintain academic standing
  7. Failure to provide safe patient care.

Students who are dismissed due to any of the items 1-5 listed above should refer to the discipline procedure in the South University Student Handbook. Students who are dismissed due to any of the items 6-7 listed above should refer to the procedures for appealing academic dismissal in the South University Student Handbook.

Doctor of Ministry Student Conduct

The South University Student Handbook defines a Code of Conduct that must be followed by all students.  Failure to comply with general University policies may result in dismissal from the Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) program and the University according to the defined disciplinary procedures enforced by the University administration.  D.Min. students are representatives of their faith communities and ambassadors of their faith traditions.  As such we hold each other to the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. 

Religious diversity and respect.  It is expected that Doctor of Ministry students will treat all South University students, faculty, and staff  with the highest levels of dignity and respect regardless of religious belief and practice.

Professional conduct.  Students in the Doctor of Ministry program are expected to abide by the highest standards of professional integrity in their practice of ministry.  The standards of professional conduct adopted by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (http://www.aapc.org/about-us/code-of-ethics/) and the Association of Professional Chaplains (http://www.professionalchaplains.org/content.asp?pl=198&contentid=198) offer more information about appropriate professional conduct in ministry settings.

A fuller presentation of student conduct issues can be found in the Doctor of Ministry Student Handbook.

Academic Year Definitions

Undergraduate Academic Year South University, Non-Term Based Programs
  • Week: 7 consecutive calendar days.
  • Course:
    • 5 week courses = 5 weeks of instructional time.
    • 10 week courses = 10 weeks of instructional time
  • Academic Year: Minimum of 30 weeks of instructional time; 36 earned credits.
  • Full-Time Enrollment: All non-term students in online programs who remain continuously enrolled, including breaks of 29 consecutive calendar days or less, are classified as full-time.
  • Instructional Week: Defined as Monday 12:00 A.M. Mountain Time (MT) to 11:59 P.M. MT the following Sunday.
  • For online classes beginning on Thursday, (this includes all 5 and 10 week courses) the attendance week is defined as beginning on Thursday at 12:00 A.M. MT to 11:59 P.M. MT the following Wednesday
Graduate Academic Year South University, Non-Term Based Programs
  • Week: 7 consecutive calendar days.
  • Course:
    • 5 week courses = 5 weeks of instructional time
    • 5 weeks and 3 days of instructional time (some courses may consist of 10 weeks or 11 weeks of instructional time).
  • Academic Year: Minimum of 30 weeks of instructional time; 32 earned credits.
  • Full-Time Enrollment: All non-term students in online programs who remain continuously enrolled, including breaks of 29 consecutive calendar days or less, are classified as full-time.
  • Instructional weeks are defined as Monday 12:00 A.M. Mountain Time (MT) to 11:59 P.M. MT the following Sunday.
  • For online classes beginning on Thursday, (this includes all 5 and 10 week courses) the attendance week is defined as beginning on Thursday at 12:00 A.M. MT to 11:59 P.M. MT the following Wednesday.

Attendance Policy

University Attendance Policy

South University maintains an institutional attendance policy to support the academic achievement of its students. Students are expected to attend all scheduled class, laboratory, and examination periods each week. Students, whether present or absent from class, are responsible for knowing all that is announced, discussed, and/or lectured upon in class or laboratory, as well as for mastering all assigned reading. In addition, students are responsible for submitting on time all assignments and examinations as required in the class.

Students are expected to attend all scheduled activities that are part of the class, including those activities scheduled during class time and those scheduled outside of class time. An individual on-campus or online program may have specific policies (which in some cases may be more stringent than the general attendance requirements) as to the effect of attendance on class meetings, course assignments, off-campus activities, internships/externships, clinical and practicum activities, and other program requirements.

Students who receive Veteran Affairs (VA) educational benefits must understand VA benefits, including tuition and fees, the monthly housing allowance, book stipend, and Yellow Ribbon benefits are based in whole or in part on the number of credit hours certified.  The school is required to monitor and report enrollment status to the VA.  Adjustments in enrollment will likely affect payment of VA benefits.  The school will report enrollment as follows: 

  • VA Students who officially withdraw, the actual last date of attendance (LDA) must be determined and reported. 
  • VA students who are administratively withdrawn or stops attending without officially withdrawing, the actual last date of attendance (LDA) must be determined and reported. 
  • VA students who complete the term with all non-punitive “F” and/or non-punitive grades, the school will determine and report the actual last date of attendance for each course.

Attendance Requirements

Students who fail to attend an on-campus class session will be given an absence for that session. Following the drop/add period, students taking on-campus classes must not miss the class meetings for 14 consecutive calendar days of the scheduled class time of the on-campus class (including on-campus classes that contain an online component). If a student misses the class meetings for 14 consecutive calendar days the student will be administratively withdrawn from the course. Following the drop/add period, if a student misses the class meetings for 21 consecutive calendar days in an 11-week on-campus course that meets once per week the student will be administratively withdrawn from the course. The last date of attendance will be the last day where the student met the attendance requirements.

Students taking online classes must post in their online course at least two days each week. Students who fail to meet the attendance requirements for a week will be given an absence for that week (7 days). Students who fail to meet the attendance requirements for 14 consecutive calendar days (two weeks) during a course will be administratively withdrawn from the course.

Receiving a grade of F in a course and failing to meet positive attendance in the last week of that course, may impact a student’s financial aid.

Students who are absent due to a medical condition (including pregnancy or any related conditions, including recovery from childbirth) will be excused for as long as a health care provider states it is medically necessary for the student to be absent. Students absent due to such medical conditions may be allowed to make up missed work. In addition to contacting their faculty, students in campus-based programs should contact the Registrar’s office, and students in online programs should contact their Academic Counselor.  Students seeking exceptions for medically-related reasons will be required to provide a doctor’s note indicating that the absences were medically necessary.  Failure to provide evidence of a medical necessity for any absence could result in the student being administratively withdrawn from school, and the student will not be allowed to make up any missed assignments. The Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations for campus based students or the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs-Online for students in online programs, in consultation with the faculty member, will determine the amount of time a student will have to make up missed assignments. Upon their return to school, students will be allowed up to 12 weeks to complete missed assignments.  Campus-based students whose conditions prevent them from completing all work within the 12 week timeline should contact the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations.  Online students should contact their Academic Counselor.

Blended Course Attendance Policy
(Includes Accelerated Graduate Programs)

Students are expected to attend all scheduled classroom meetings and participate in online activities during each week of the quarter. 

Students must attend the first classroom meeting of the course. Failure to attend the first classroom meeting time will result in the student being administratively withdrawn from the course. Students taking blended courses that meet face to face one (1) to two (2) times may not miss any classroom meetings. Students taking blended courses that met three (3) to five (5) times during the session may only miss one classroom meeting.  Missing more than the minimum number of classroom meetings or the first classroom meeting will result in the student being administratively withdrawn from the course. Students taking blended courses that meet face to face six (6) or more times during the session may miss up to two (2) classroom meetings.  Missing more than two classroom meetings or the first classroom meeting will result in the student being administratively withdrawn from the course.

In addition to the classroom meetings, students are expected to post at least once in the online classroom each week.  Students who fail to meet the online attendance requirements for a week will be given an absence for that week (7 days). Students who fail to meet the online attendance requirements for 14 consecutive calendar days (two weeks) during a course will be administratively withdrawn from the course. The last date of attendance will be the last day where the student met the attendance requirements.

Students failing to meet either the classroom or the online attendance policy will be administratively withdrawn from a course.

Receiving a grade of F in a course and failing to meet positive attendance in the last week of that course, may impact a student’s financial aid.

Attendance Appeals for Administrative Withdrawals

Students who are administratively withdrawn from a course due to attendance may appeal the decision. Students must complete the Attendance Appeal Request form and submit the form to the Registrar’s office for campus-based students or to their Academic Counselor for students in online programs within 4 calendar days of being administratively withdrawn from a course.

In order to be considered for an appeal the student must have one of the mitigating circumstances listed in the South University Satisfactory Academic Progression policy.  Students may be required to submit supporting documentation with their appeal.

For campus-based students, the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations will consider the appeal. For students in online programs, the SAP Appeals Committee will consider the appeal.  The decision of the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations and the SAP Appeals Committee is considered final.

NOTE: A student’s life issues and the student’s transition to college are not considered mitigating circumstances under this policy.

Attendance Week

For on-campus classes beginning on a Saturday, the attendance week is defined as beginning on Saturday at 12:00 A.M. in the campus’ time zone to 11:59 P.M. in the campus’ time zone the following Friday. For on-campus classes beginning on Thursday, the attendance week is defined as beginning on Thursday at 12:00 A.M. in the campus’ time zone to 11:59 P.M. in the campus’ time zone the following Wednesday. The last week of the class begins on Thursday at 12:00 A.M. in the campus’ time zone and ends on the following Saturday at 11:59 P.M. in the campus’ time zone.

The attendance week for the Accelerated Graduate Programs, on-campus, is defined as beginning on Wednesday at 12:00 A.M. to the following Tuesday at 11:59 P.M.

For online classes beginning on a Monday, the attendance week is defined as beginning on Monday at 12:00 A.M. Mountain Time (MT) to 11:59 P.M. MT the following Sunday. For online classes beginning on Thursday, (this includes all 5 and 10 week courses) the attendance week is defined as beginning on Thursday at 12:00 A.M. MT to 11:59 P.M. MT the following Wednesday.

Course Enrollment Policies

Course Substitution Policy

Students are expected to complete the program requirements outlined in the South University Academic Catalog in effect at the time they enroll.  However, programs are subject to change at the discretion of South University. In these situations or due to other mitigating circumstances (e.g., change in program of study), students may request a course substitution.  Campus-based students should submit a Course Substitution Form to the Program Director for consideration at their Campus; online students should submit the Form to their Academic Counselor. The Academic Counselor will forward the form to the Program Director for consideration. The Program Director will then forward the request and recommendation to the Program Chair for approval.  Substitutions for General Education courses will be reviewed by the appropriate General Education Program Director and Chair. To be considered for a substitution, the course must be successfully completed at South University, and satisfy the program student learning outcomes as listed in the Academic Catalog.  Students should submit all requests at least six (6) months prior to graduating.

Course substitutions not recommended by the Program Director, may be appealed to the Chair. Course substitutions denied by the Chair may be appealed to the College/School Dean or designee. The decision of the College/School Dean is final.

Prerequisite Coursework Policy

The determination of the suitability of particular required prerequisite coursework will be made by the program director in consultation with the Chair of the Department in which the program is based. Coursework will be deemed acceptable if it meets the following criteria:

  • Content and comparability relative to standard college/university coursework in the specific discipline of the required courses as determined by the program Director or designee.
  • Science courses must have been completed within 7 years before the date of matriculation.
  • Coursework must be from an acceptable accredited collegiate institution that possesses either regional or national accreditation granted by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Coursework from Non-U.S. institutions will be considered if the coursework is evaluated by an accredited agency that can provide a statement of equivalency between foreign coursework and standard college/university coursework, including grades (e.g. Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc.), and that is acceptable to South University.
  • Coursework must be successfully completed for credit, with an appropriate grade greater than or equal to a C.

Change of Program

Students will be allowed one change of program. Changing from a day offering to an evening offering of the same program is not considered a change of program. Changing from an associate’s degree to a bachelor’s degree in the same program is not considered a change of program. Changing from one specialization or concentration within a program to another specialization or concentration within the same program is not considered a change of program. A student may change his or her program at any point of his or her enrollment provided that s/he is in good satisfactory academic standing. The Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations (for on-campus students) or the appropriate Assistant College Dean for Online Programs (for students in online programs) or the Assistant College Dean for Campus Programs (for students in the Accelerated Graduate Program) may grant exceptions to students on Academic/Financial Aid Warning or Probation. Only then will a student to be allowed the opportunity of changing from one program to another.

Courses that apply to the second program will be recorded as earned credit and will affect the student’s Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA). For Incremental Completion Rate (ICR) purposes, earned credit applied to the new program will reduce the total number of credits that must be attempted within the program. Therefore, the maximum allowable credits are one and one half times the number of credits remaining to complete for graduation. Students who change programs and students who change session times within the same program must sign a new program enrollment form (or the like), which must be filed in the student’s academic file.

Students in campus based programs must contact the Registrar’s office to change their program. Students in online programs must contact their Academic Counselor to change their program.

A course required in a student’s initial program that is not required in the student’s subsequent program may have a negative impact on a student’s financial aid. Therefore, students should consult with Student Financial Services before changing their program.

Program Change from Nursing (RN to BSN) to RN to Master of Science in Nursing (RN to MSN)**

** South University, Online Program offerings may not be available to residents of all states.  Please contact an admissions representative for further information.

The criteria used in determining a request for transfer from the RN to BSN to the RN to MSN program admission included::

  • A CGPA of 3.0 in all courses taken at South University.
  • Review of student’s transcript and writing sample.

The nursing program director or chair will review the request and the student will be notified of the transfer decision.  Approval of the request is also dependent on space availability.

Campus Transfers

A student must be in satisfactory academic standing in order to be allowed the opportunity of transferring from one South University campus to another, from one campus to an online (or partially online) program, or from an EDMC school to a South University campus, online program, or partially online program. To be considered a campus transfer student, the student must complete the quarter for campus-based students or session for online students at the originating school and immediately start at the new campus in the next quarter for campus-based students or session for online students. If the student has a break in enrollment, he/she will be considered a reentry student at the new school.

A student who has been terminated from a South University campus, online program, or partially online program and wishes to transfer to another South University campus, online program, or partially online program must appeal his/her dismissal at the originating campus or program and receive reinstatement before the transfer.

Students Transferring Between a Campus Program and an Online Program

A student who transfers from a campus program to an online program or who transfers from an online program to a campus program is subject to the following the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policies and procedures:

  • A student who is in good standing per SAP in his/her term-based program transferring to either a campus term-based program or an online term-based program, will be evaluated according to the SAP policies and procedures for term based programs.
  • A student who is in good standing per SAP in his/her non-term based  program transferring to either a campus term-based program or an online term-based program, will be evaluated according to the SAP policies and procedures for term based programs.

Note that the evaluation criteria and period of time until the next applicable evaluation point may differ from the SAP policies and procedures of the student’s original program. The student should work closely with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor to understand the SAP implications (including financial aid implications) of his/her transfer before taking any action.

Graduate Nursing Programs Student Campus to Campus Transfer Policy

The student completes the Graduate Nursing Student Transfer Request form and submits to the Program Director of the campus of origin at least 45 days prior to the desired transfer date. The Program Director confers with the student and confirms the student meets the program progression standards.
The Program Director consults with the receiving campus Program Director and completes the transfer request form and forwards the form to the Program Director of the receiving campus 30 days prior to transfer. For students transferring to online programs, the transfer request form is also sent to the Academic Counselor handling the student transfer.
The receiving campus Program Director will consult with the student and informs her/him of the request for transfer decision and space availability.  The completed form is then resubmitted to the originating campus and the receiving campus’ Registrar’s office.

To be eligible to transfer campuses:

  • The student must be in good academic standing and meeting the program progression standards as outlined in the South University Catalog.
  • The student will be made aware that there will only be one (1) transfer made between campuses in the South University system, unless there are documented and approved mitigating circumstances.

The student may only transfer to another campus while he or she is enrolled in didactic courses.  Once practica courses are begun, the student cannot transfer unless there are documented and approved mitigating circumstances.

Student Course Load Policies

Course Load

To complete program requirements in a timely manner, most term-based students choose to attend classes full-time and enroll in 4 quarters per year. Course load designations for term-based students are as follows:

Undergraduate

Half-time: 6-8 credit hours.
Three-quarter time: 9-11 credit hours.
Full-time: 12 or more credit hours.

Graduate

Half-time: 4 credit hours.
Three-quarter time: 6 credit hours.
Full-time: 8 or more credit hours.

Students in non-term based programs participate in a minimum of 30 weeks of instructional time, with a full-time status of 36 (undergraduate) or 32 (graduate) earned credits. All non-term based  students who remain continuously enrolled, including breaks of 29 consecutive calendar days or less, are classified as full-time.

Course Overloads

Students may wish to enroll in greater than the full-time number of courses in a particular quarter or academic year. Overloads will only be approved for students who exhibit outstanding academic performance.

On-campus students wishing to enroll in more than 16 credit hours (undergraduate) or more than 8 credit hours (graduate) must have the permission of their Program Director or the campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations to receive a course overload.

Students in non-term based programs may wish to enroll in more than one course at a time. Non-term based students may not take more than two courses at any one time. In all cases, non-term based students cannot complete 36 credits in less than 30 weeks of instructional time. Non-term based students must have the permission of their Academic Counselor and Program Director to receive a course overload.  Students in term-based programs may wish to enroll in more than 16 credit hours (undergraduate) or more than 8 credit hours (graduate) must have the permission of their Academic Counselor and Program Director to receive a course overload.

Individual programs may designate the specific courses to be taken each quarter or session (thus specifying the total number of hours to be taken) or the specific course sequence to be scheduled. In such cases a student need not obtain permission for his/her enrollment unless s/he wishes to enroll in more than the designated number of credit hours or enroll in a non-specified sequence of courses, or must deviate due to other circumstances.

Coursework Taken Outside a Student’s Degree Program

Students enroll in a degree program and the courses taken must all apply to that program. The requirements for the program are defined in this Academic Catalog. A degree program may include elective courses which apply to that program. Any course that is defined as a possible elective is acceptable for student enrollment, as long as the elective requirement has not already been satisfied by another course.

If a student takes a course not required by his/her degree program, that course does not qualify for financial aid and does not qualify for computing the student’s load for financial aid purposes. The student is responsible for payment of the course’s tuition and any associated fees. The student must complete, sign, and submit the Coursework Intent Form (which must also be signed by the appropriate Financial Aid and Registrar staff members or their designees) to confirm the student’s financial responsibility for course’s tuition and any associated fees and that the tuition and associated fees will not be covered by financial aid.

A student who needs to complete one course to complete an associate’s degree and then intends to proceed directly into a bachelor’s degree program cannot take the bachelor’s program courses during the final quarter (for students enrolled in term-based programs) or the final payment period (for students enrolled in non-term based programs) of the associate’s program and receive financial aid for those bachelor’s program courses.

Students receiving VA benefits may take courses not required for their program of study to bring his/her course load up to a full-time in his/her last term only. This allows students to continue to receive benefits at the full-time rate in their last term of enrollment, even though fewer credits are required to complete the program. Students may only do this once in their program of study.  Students should select courses in consultation with their Academic Advisor or Academic Counselor. Students must meet all pre-requisite requirements for the courses selected.

Auditing Courses

A student wishing to audit a course without receiving credit must obtain permission from the campus academic affairs officer and complete and sign a class audit form before registering for the course. (Policy for some courses forbids auditing.) A student may not change from audit to credit status or from credit to audit status after the registration process has been completed. A grade designation of AU (Audit) will be recorded on student transcripts for audited courses. The regular schedule of fees applies to auditors. Unauthorized auditing is prohibited. Online courses cannot be audited.

Transient Students

Students wishing to take classes at another institution while enrolled with South University should contact their Registrar’s office before enrolling in another institution. Students must be in good academic standing with South University. The Registrar’s office can provide guidance on what courses may transfer into South University from the other institution. Without prior approval no guarantees are made that courses taken at other universities will be accepted for credit at South University.

Retaking Coursework

Effective July 1, 2011, the Department of Education amended the full-time enrollment status definition for programs at term-based institutions. In a standard term-based program, students who retake previously completed coursework are considered eligible for additional Title IV assistance, even if the students will not receive credit for that coursework in addition to credits already received. To comply with this provision and to assist students with managing appropriate FSA loan balances, South University has implemented the following policy on retaking coursework for standard term and non-term based programs.

Standard Term-based Undergraduate Programs

Students enrolled in standard term-based undergraduate programs will receive Title IV funds for unlimited retakes of failed courses and withdrawn courses with no credits earned as long as the student is meeting the satisfactory academic progress (SAP) standards.  Although there is no limit on how many times students can repeat failed or withdrawn courses for FSA purposes, South University has limitations on how many times students can retake failed courses before they are dismissed from the institution. Please refer to the school’s SAP Policy.

For standard term-based undergraduate programs, South University’s policy will allow financial aid to cover a single repetition of a previously successfully passed course subject to certain conditions.  Students who earned credit(s) may receive Title IV funds for one retake of any previously passed course only if they meet one of the following conditions:

  • Specific State or Accreditation regulations require a student to retake a course which was previously successfully passed.
  • Required as part of an academic plan if a student has successfully appealed a Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) termination, as defined under Progress or Professional Requirements.
  • For students who need a specific grade or G.P.A. to practice upon graduation or progress in a program, as defined under Progress or Professional Requirements.

The student must have completed the course for it to be considered a repetition under this policy.  Because only one repetition of a previously passed course may be included in the a student’s enrollment status for purposes of Title IV aid, if the student failed the repeated course, the student is not eligible for an additional retake because the student is considered to have completed the course.  A student enrolled in developmental courses (ENG0099 and MAT0099) must successfully complete the course after three attempts or the student will be academically dismissed from the University.

Non-term Based Undergraduate Programs

Student’s coursework is divided into payment periods based the credit hours and weeks of instructional time in the program or the academic year, whichever is less. A student must successfully complete the credit hours and instructional weeks in a payment period, or withdrawal, in order to advance to the next payment period and academic year.  Students who fail or withdrawal from a course will not earn credits for the payment period and academic year.  Students who successfully completed a course (earned credits) and wish to repeat the course to earn a better grade or G.P.A., the course attempted and earned credits will not be included in the payment period and academic year credits requirement.  Students may only use FSA funds to cover such repeated courses to the extent excess funds are available in the academic year.  A student enrolled in developmental courses (ENG0099 and MAT0099) must successfully complete the course after three attempts or the student will be academically dismissed from the University.

CREDIT FOR TRANSCRIPTED AND NON-TRANSCRIPTED WORK AND ACCEPTANCE OF TRANSCRIPTED (TRANSFER) CREDIT

Acceptance of Transcripted (Transfer) Credit

Credit for undergraduate transfer work will be considered if the potential course meets all of the following conditions:

  • The course was taken at an acceptable accredited collegiate institution.
  • The course carries a grade of “C” or better.
  • For transfer credit from colleges that award plusses and minuses, the plus or minus will be dropped when the course is transferred to South University, and plusses and minuses will not be used for computing GPA.  (For example: a C+ or C- will transfer as a C and will count as a C in any computation of GPA for programmatic admission requirements.)
  • The course is directly equivalent to a course required by the South University program in which the student is enrolled.

Courses taken at other institutions may be combined to satisfy one or more equivalent South University courses, but no course may be counted more than once in calculating transfer credit.  Students may be required to provide additional supporting documentation such as a course description or a syllabus for a class to be considered for Transfer of Credit.

The award of transfer credit may also be considered in the following cases:

  • In an area requirement that a South University program does not specify a particular course, a student may submit for transfer of credit consideration a course not offered by South University but directly related in its content to the area requirement.
  • For example, if a South University program allows a student to select coursework from an approved list of Arts and Humanities courses to fulfill the Arts and Humanities requirement within General Education, a student may submit for transfer of credit consideration an Arts and Humanities course not offered by South University.
  • In all cases, the course submitted must also be taken at an acceptable accredited collegiate institution and carry a grade of “C” or better in order to be considered for transfer of credit.
  • For a specific course requirement in a South University program, a student may submit for transfer of credit consideration a course directly related to the course requirement but at a higher content and course level than the specific course requirement.
  • In a program area or in general education where courses are specified, a student may submit coursework to South University that is in a related discipline that may substitute for the required course(s). Course substitutions must be approved by the Department Chair or Dean of the College. In all cases, the course submitted must also be taken at an acceptable accredited collegiate institution and carry a grade of “C” or better in order to be considered for transfer of credit.
  • Course work taken as part of a diploma, certificate or terminal associate degree may be accepted for transfer of credit. The courses submitted must be taken at an acceptable accredited collegiate institution and carry a grade of “C” or better in order to be considered for transfer of credit.

All coursework will be evaluated for its current relevance and may not transfer if the material in the coursework is deemed to be significantly noncurrent in the subject area. Individual Colleges/Schools and/or programs within South University may place limits on the age of courses eligible for transfer of credit.

In the case of courses evaluated for General Education transfer credit, the submitted courses must meet the criteria established by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools for General Education credit (as stated in the current Principles of Accreditation The course must also be specifically classified as General Education (i.e., a survey or introductory course) at the transferring institution to be considered for General Education transfer of credit).

Transfer credit will not be given by South University for developmental courses such as basic Mathematics or basic English. Transfer of credit will not be given for English as a Second Language (ESL) coursework. If both a separate laboratory course and the related lecture/didactic course are evaluated for transfer of credit, credit will only be considered for the separate laboratory course if the related lecture/didactic course also received a grade of C or better. Students should consult with the Registrar about questions related to acceptance of transfer credit.

Acceptance of credits earned at other institutions, through examination, and/or other institutions, through examination, and/or other means described in this catalog is limited to 75 percent* of the total hours required for an undergraduate degree. No more than half the major area course requirements can be earned through transfer credit, through examination, and/or other means described in this catalog. Note that programmatic accreditation and/or specific state requirements may alter these percentages.

Note: For transfer of credit guidelines for the Criminal Justice (MS)  see the College of Arts and Sciences. For transfer of credit guidelines for the Doctor of Business Administration, Master of Public Administration program and the Master of Business Administration program see the College of Business. For transfer of credit guidelines for the Associate of Science in Medical Assisting program see the College of Health Professions. For transfer of credit guidelines for the nursing programs see the College of Nursing and Public Health.

*Students at the Richmond and Virginia Beach campuses may only transfer in 70% of the total credit hours required for an undergraduate degree.

General Education Transfer Credit

Students who enroll at South University having graduated with an A.A. or A.S. degree intended for transfer into a baccalaureate degree from a post-secondary institution that participates in a statewide general education articulation agreement in the following states will have satisfied all Area I (General Education) Requirements:

  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana*
  • Michigan**
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio***
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia

In order to qualify, applicants must provide an official transcript verifying graduation with an A.A. or A.S. degree from an institution that meets the criteria described above. Certain programs at South University have specialized admission requirements, which are unaffected by this policy.

* Students must complete one of eight (A.A./LTD or A.S./LTD) eligible concentrations for the Louisiana Transfer (LT) degree as shown at: http://latransferdegree.org/college-students/

**Eligibility is limited to institutions participating in the Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars & Admissions Officers (MACRAO) Transfer Agreement at: https://www.macrao.org/publications/macraoagreement.asp or the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA) at: https://www.macrao.org/Publications/MTA%20Participation%20Guidelines%20&%20Signature%20Form.pdf

***Eligibility is limited to institutions participating in the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) at:  https://www.ohiohighered.org/transfer/policy

GED Performance Levels

South University accepts the GED as a measure of high school equivalency and recognizes several GED scoring performance levels.

Students being admitted on the basis of GED scores will be exempt from taking related placement test(s) if they meet certain criteria. Exemption from MAT0099 Principles of Algebra, or ENG0099 Principles of Composition, is based on the following:

  • MAT0099: minimum score of 165 in Mathematical Reasoning
  • ENG0099: minimum score of 165 in Reasoning Through Language Arts
  • Students scoring 175 or higher in the subject areas of the GED listed below may be awarded SU credit as indicated:
    • Science: General Education Natural Science without laboratory (4 credit hours)
    • Social Studies: HIS1101 U.S. History I: Colonial to 1865, HIS1102 U.S. History II: 1865 to Present, or POL2076 American Government (4 credit hours)

Information Technology Transfer Credit

For all Information Technology courses, transfer of credit is not accepted for courses that are older than seven years.

Students can meet the ITS1000 requirement if they meet any of the following criteria:

  • A score of 50 or higher (out of 80) on the CLEP Information Systems and Computer Applications national exam, credit will be awarded for ITS1000 Computer and Internet Literacy (four credit hours).
  • A score of 3 or higher (out of 5) on the College Board Advanced Placement Computer Science A exam, credit will be awarded for ITS1000 Computer and Internet Literacy (four credit hours).
  • The student holds a current Microsoft Office Specialist certification; credit will be awarded for ITS1000 Computer and Internet Literacy (four credit hours). Students must provide a copy of the certification to the University
  • A score of 70 or higher (out of 100) on the South University ITS1000 Placement Exam, credit will be awarded for ITS1000 Computer and Internet Literacy (four credit hours).

Credit for Industry Standard Certifications

South University’s Bachelor of Science in Information Technology accepts two Comptia certification examinations for college credit, which includes the Comptia Security+ and Network+ certifications. Credits earned through these examinations will be accepted as transfer credit and a student must submit a copy of their CompTIA Certificate(s) with a Date Certified no older than 7 years to validate their certification(s) and be eligible for possible transfer credit award. For the Comptia Security+ certification students will earn credit for ITS3104 IT Security Access and Protection and for the Comptia Network+ certification students will earn credit for ITS2103 Fundamentals of Networking.

Science Courses Transfer Credit

For students in the Physical Therapist Assistant program, the following courses will not be accepted for transfer of credit if the course is older than 7 years before the student’s original start date:

  • AHS1001 Medical Terminology
  • BIO1011 Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BIO1012 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
  • BIO1013 Anatomy and Physiology II
  • BIO1014 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab

For students in the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences, the Associate of Sciences in Allied Health Sciences or the Bachelor of Science in Public Health programs, the following courses will not be accepted for transfer of credit if the course is older than 7 years before the student’s original start date:

  • AHS1001 Medical Terminology
  • BIO1011 Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BIO1012 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
  • BIO1013 Anatomy and Physiology II
  • BIO1014 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
  • BIO2015 Human Pathophysiology
  • BIO2070 Microbiology
  • BIO2071 Microbiology Lab (online students only)

OR

  • BIO2073 Microbiology Laboratory (campus students only)
  • CHM1010 General Chemistry
  • NTR2050 Nutrition

RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and RN to Master of Science in Nursing** (MSN) General Education and Foundation Courses Transfer Credit

** South University, Online Program offerings may not be available to residents of all states.  Please contact an admissions representative for further information.

Students applying to the RN to BSN degree program and the RN to MSN degree program, who have earned an associate’s degree in nursing from an acceptable accredited institution, may receive up to 90 transfer of credits for the General Education and Foundation course requirements. For students to receive block transfer credit for General Education courses, they must meet the standards outlined in the General Education Transfer Credit policy

Students who have completed their degrees at a non-American institution, must provide an official evaluation of credit from a recognized credit evaluation agency (e.g., World Education Service).  Transfer of credit will be reviewed and awarded on a course by course basis.

Students who are awarded transfer of credit for the following courses:

  • BIO1011 Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BIO1012 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab

Will be exempted from AHS1001 Medical Terminology. Students will select another 4 credit course in consultation with their Academic Advisor or Academic Counselor to fulfill the degree requirements.

Acceptance of Graduate Transfer Credit

Transfer credit may be allowed in some graduate or post baccalaureate degree programs at the discretion of the College/School Dean or Department Chair. However, the majority of credits toward any graduate or post baccalaureate degree program must be earned at South University.

The University reserves the right to reject any or all undergraduate or graduate credits from other institutions, regardless of their accreditation status, when it determines through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at such institutions is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. The judgment of the University on this question shall be final. The University reserves the right to disallow transfer credit for courses if the student’s subsequent grades in required courses in the same subject fall below average.

Credits Earned at a South University Campus

Credits earned at any South University campus will be accepted at all campuses except as mentioned herein. If accepted, these credits will not be considered transfer credit (with the exception of Legal Studies [“LGS”] courses for students in the Associate of Science in Paralegal Studies or Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies programs); they will be included as credits earned at South University. If a campus should close a program in any state, students in good standing will be accepted at any South University campus having the same or a similar authorized degree program. The credits earned in the students’ original degree program will be applied to the degree program at the new location.

Acceptance of Non-transcripted Credit

South University offers students an opportunity to obtain course credit in areas of competency through several non-transcripted means, including AP Examinations, University-administered proficiency examinations, education training, and military experience and training. South University does not award credit for life experience. Acceptance of credits earned at other institutions, through examination, and/or other means described in this catalog is limited to 75 percent* of the total hours required for an undergraduate degree. No more than half the major area course requirements (i.e., those requirements beyond General Education) can be earned through transfer credit, through examination, and/or other means described in this catalog.

*Students at the Richmond and Virginia Beach campuses may only transfer in 70% of the total hours required for an undergraduate degree.

Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE)

Credit may be awarded in the Doctor of Ministry (D.MIN.) program for work successfully completed at a CPE center accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE).  Four credit hours (quarter credits) may be awarded for each unit of CPE completed.  Students must provide documentation from the center indicating the dates of the program, and the hours and units or levels completed; the form must be signed by a certified CPE supervisor or his/her designee.

  • If a student has completed 2 units (Level I), MIN7591 and MIN7691 can be awarded transfer of credit.  
  • If a student has completed 4-5 units, but can only document Level II, then MIN7592 and MIN7692 can be awarded transfer of credit.
  • If a student has completed 4-5 units (Levels I and II) with documentation, then MIN7591, MIN7691, MIN7161 and MIN7563 can be awarded transfer of credit.

College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations

South University supports the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program, which allows high school students the opportunity to pursue college level courses in their own schools and to be taught the material by their own teachers. After completion of the AP courses, students take the appropriate AP test to determine their level of achievement. For college credit to be awarded, a student must have official score reports from the College Board sent directly to the Office of Registrar at South University.

Since there is major overlap in course content between the two English AP exams, the awarding of AP credit in English will be treated separately from that of other disciplines as follows:

  1. If a student receives a score of “3” on either English AP exam, credit will be awarded for ENG1100 Composition I (four credit hours);
  2. If a student receives a score of “4” or “5” on the English Language and Composition Exam, credit will be awarded for ENG1100 Composition I and ENG1200 Composition II  (eight credit hours);
  3. If a student receives a score of “4” or “5” on the English Literature and Composition Exam, credit will be awarded for ENG1100 Composition I and ENG 1300 Composition III (eight credit hours).

If a student receives a score of 3 or higher on the AP Computer Science A exam, credit will be awarded for ITS1000 Computer and Internet Literacy (four credit hours).

For additional information concerning the awarding of AP credit, contact the Registrar at the appropriate campus.

Credit by Examination

CLEP and DSST certification exams can be submitted for evaluation for course credit. The guidelines for awarding credit are available from the Registrar at the appropriate campus. In general, no score less than 50 on the CLEP test will be considered for course credit. The credit granting score for DSST exams is available from the Registrar.

If students earn a credit granting score for a CLEP or DSST exam that does not directly correlate to a course offered by South University, credit may be awarded as a) free elective, OR b) General Education credit in the appropriate area.

Credits earned by examination are considered in the same way as transfer credits and are not used in the computation of the student’s grade point average. Students may not earn more than 75 percent* of their total credits and 50 percent of their major credits through credit by examination, transfer credit, or a combination thereof. The time limit for granting credit by examination for any course is the same as that for accepting transfer credit for the same course.

*Students at the Richmond and Virginia Beach campuses may only transfer in 70% of the total credit hours required for an undergraduate degree.

Credit by Education Training

College credit may also be awarded for education training completed through business and industry, the armed services, or government organizations. South University is guided by the principles and recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) guidebooks when assessing requests for credit earned in this manner. Students must have their ACE transcripts sent directly from the Center for Adult Learning and Educational Credentials to the appropriate campus Registrar at South University.

University Credit for Military Experience and Training

The University recognizes and uses the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services to determine the value of learning acquired in military service. We award credit for appropriate learning acquired in military service at levels consistent with ACE Guide recommendations when applicable to a Service member’s program. In addition, we utilize Joint Services Transcript (JST) or Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) Transcript in our processing of prior learning experiences for possible transfer credit.

Students who wish to have their military experience and training evaluated for university credit should send the JST or the CCAF transcript to the appropriate campus Registrar.  Additionally, credit may also be awarded through review of a student’s certified Department of Defense (DD) Form 214 (Armed forces of the United States Report of Transfer or Discharge) in conjunction with the ACE Guide, to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Forces. Credit will be applied to a degree program upon the approval of the Department Chair from which the degree is to be awarded.

Timing of Transcripted and Nontranscripted Credit Consideration and Acceptance

South University will accept transcripts for transcripted (transfer) and documentation of non-transcripted credit evaluation at any point during a student’s program of study, provided that limits placed on the total number of credits for the program and components of the program will not be exceeded. During a student’s first quarter enrolled at South University, all official transcripts must be received and evaluated for those courses related to establishing basis of admission. No courses will be evaluated for transfer of credit during a student’s final quarter before graduation. Active/Guard/Drilling Reserve military students may have a waiver from this policy concerning their final quarter or final two sessions (for students in on-campus programs) or final two course sessions (for students in on-line programs) and should work closely with their academic advisors or academic counselors as to their eligibility to have courses evaluated for transfer of credit at any time during their program.

Students are encouraged to submit all transcripts for transfer of credit evaluation or documentation for non-transcripted credit as soon as possible upon admission to their program of study to enable accurate scheduling of coursework. Students are also strongly encouraged to discuss with their advisors or registrars the potential transferability of outside coursework being considered.

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits Earned at South University

In the U.S. higher education system, transferability of credit is determined by the receiving institution taking into account such factors as course content, grades, accreditation and licensing.  For this reason South University does not imply, promise, or guarantee that credits earned at South University will be accepted by another college or university. If the credits or degree, diploma, or certificate that you earn at this institution are not accepted at the institution to which you seek to transfer, you may be required to repeat some or all of your coursework at that institution. Students considering transferring to another college or university are responsible for determining whether that school will accept South University credits. South University encourages students to initiate discussions with the potential transfer school as early as possible.

The Associate of Applied Science programs are considered by some educational institutions and state agencies to be “terminal” and/or “occupational” programs. Credits earned in terminal and/or occupational programs are generally not applicable to other degrees; however, the acceptance of transfer credit remains at the discretion of the receiving institution.

Credit Hour Definitions

Definition of a Credit Hour

South University operates on a quarter system, with each quarter having approximately 10 to 12 weeks. Course credit is awarded on the basis of the number of hours spent in lecture and/or lab situations. One quarter credit hour is equivalent to at least 10 hours of lecture/didactic or guided research, 20 hours of lab work, 30 hours of internship/externship or clinical practicum, or a combination of these equivalencies.

Course offerings are equivalent in course hours whether offered in a 4, 5.0, 5.5, 10 or 11 week format and regardless of modality.

*Some programs may require additional instruction engagement/contact hours above the thresholds established in this policy.

Credit Hour and Outside Class Expectations

South University operates on a quarter system with each quarter having approximately 10 to 12 weeks.

Students can expect ten (10) hours of instructional engagement for every one quarter credit hour of a course. Instructional engagement activities include lectures, presentations, discussions, group-work, and other activities that would normally occur during class time. Instructional engagement activities may occur in a face- to-face meeting or in the e-classroom.

In addition to instructional engagement, students can expect to complete at least twenty (20) hours of outside work for every one quarter credit hour of a course. Outside work includes preparing for and completing readings and assignments. Such outside work also includes, but is not limited to, all research associated with completing assignments, work with others to complete a group project, participation in tutorials, labs, simulations, and other electronic activities that are not a part of the instructional engagement, as well as any activities related to preparation for instructional engagement.

Other academic work leading to the awarding of credit hours requires at least an equivalent amount of work as listed in the paragraph above and shall be applied to other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, guided research, and studio work. For example, one quarter credit hour is also equivalent to at least 20 hours of lab work, 30 hours of internship/externship, clinical practicum, or a combination of the equivalencies.

*Some programs may require additional instruction engagement/contact hours above the thresholds established in this policy.

South University offers three modalities of instruction as defined below:

Fully-Online: instructional engagement is achieved via technology through a learning management system and other technology tools.

Campus/On-site Courses:  All instructional engagement is delivered face to face.

Blended (Hybrid): Instructional engagement is delivered via a combination of online activities (e-classroom) and face to face interaction with online activities replacing no more than 50% of the face-to-face instructional engagement activity.  (In accelerated programs, online activities may constitute a higher percentage.)  Blended courses must be approved through a specific application process and are initiated by campus based faculty or academic administration. Online course content in blended classes, including assignments, is determined by the College/School, and is consistent in all blended course shells. Instructors may add additional content to the classroom shell, not to exceed 20% of the total.

Academic Colleges/ Schools are responsible for ensuring that credit hours are awarded only for work that meets the requirements outlined in this policy

Credit Hour Conversions

Semester credit hours are converted to quarter credit hours by multiplying the number of semester credits by 3 and then dividing the result by 2. For example, a 3 semester credit hour course equals a 4.5 quarter credit hour course (3 semester hours multiplied by 3, with the result divided by 2) while a 2 semester credit hour course equals a 3 quarter credit hour course (2 semester hours multiplied by 3, with the result divided by 2). Credits will be rounded up or down as appropriate (i.e., 2.0 to 2.49 will be rounded down to 2 credit hours, 2.50 to 2.99 will be rounded up to 3 credit hours).

Grade Level Classification

On-Campus Programs

Students are classified according to the number of credit hours earned toward completion of the program. Students with fewer than 36 credits are considered freshmen; with as many as 37 but fewer than 90, a sophomore; with as many as 91 but fewer than 126, a junior; and with 127 or more, a senior, as illustrated in the following table:

Freshman: 0-36 hrs.
Sophomore: 37-90 hrs.
Junior: 91-126 hrs.
Senior: 127+ hrs.

Online Programs

Undergraduate students are classified according to the number of credit hours earned toward completion of the program. Students with fewer than 36 credits are considered freshmen; with as many as 36 but fewer than 72, a sophomore; with as many as 73 but fewer than 108, a junior; and with 109 or more, a senior, as illustrated in the following table:

Freshman: 0-36 credits
Sophomore: 37-72 credits
Junior: 73-108 credits
Senior: 109+ credits

Grading Policies

Grading System

Grade Quality Points Range Interpretation
A 4.0 90-100 Excellent
B 3.0 80-89 Above Average
C 2.0 70-79 Average
D 1.0 60-69 Minimum Passing
F 0.0 0-59 Failure
WF 0.0 0 Withdraw/Failure
NCF 0.0 0 Non-Completion Failure
LP* 0.0 33-79 Limited Progress

Grades or symbols of  “D,” “F,”  “W,” “WP,” “WF,” “NCF” and “LP” can negatively affect one or more of the following and should be considered punitive in terms of a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP):  Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), Incremental Completion Rate (ICR) or Maximum Allowable Timeframe (MTF).  A grade of “C” may also be punitive in certain graduate and professional program courses requiring a grade of “B” or higher.  Refer to the catalog section on “Explanations of Related Issues” for additional information on calculation of CGPA, ICR, and MTF.

*Note: The grade of LP may be awarded in Pass/Fail courses. Students who complete the remaining assignments in the extension course receive a letter grade or grade of P and the grade for the original dissertation course is changed to a letter grade or to P.  Students who complete at least half of the remaining assignments may be awarded the grade of LP and then register for a subsequent extension course. Students who do not make adequate progress receive a grade of F and the grade for the original dissertation course is changed to a grade of F. 

Calculation of Grade Point Average

The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is determined by dividing the total number of quality points, calculated by multiplying the numeric equivalents of course grades (e.g., A=4.0) by the number of credit hours assigned to each course (e.g., 4 credit hours x 4.0), by the total number of credit hours attempted. Transfer credits, course exemptions, and non-punitive grades will not be used in determining grade point average.

The following symbols are used on grade reports, but are not used in the determination of a student’s grade point average:

EX Course exempted
PR Course credit earned through credit by examination
TR Course credit through transfer
P Pass
AU Audit
W Withdrawal, no grade penalty
WP Withdraw/Passing
WV Waiver for a course, does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA, does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions
WX Withdrawal,  never attended but registered (no course credit or residence credit)
I Incomplete
^ Caret Symbol, which denotes a developmental course grade

Incompletes are given at the discretion of the faculty member to any student who does not complete the course requirements. To receive an incomplete the student must have completed at least one-half (50 percent) of the course requirements. If the incomplete is granted, it is the student’s responsibility to complete the remainder of the required coursework.

Incomplete grades must be cleared within 14 consecutive calendar days of the end of session (unless special approval is received from the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations, or College/School Dean) or the incomplete will be changed to the grade earned. The final grade for the course will be designated on the transcript by the appropriate letter grade.

School of Pharmacy Grading and Credit Hours

To satisfactorily complete a course, a student must earn a grade of 2.00 (C) or better for the course.  The course grade may be based upon components such as quizzes, examinations, participation and assignments as outlined in each course syllabus.  The format of course examinations may vary at the discretion of the instructor(s).  Common exam formats used include multiple choice, matching, short answer, essay and demonstrations of clinical competencies.  Specific instructions regarding missed assignments or examinations are outlined in each course syllabus, but approval of the course coordinator(s) is a common requirement for making up a missed test or examination.  Specific information regarding the calculation of course grades can be found in the syllabus of each course.  Students are encouraged to read course syllabi carefully and to contact the course coordinator(s) if any questions arise.

Course instructors will make every effort to post graded examinations and assignments promptly.  Students may be allowed to review and/or required remediate examinations and assignments after they have been graded.  At that time, faculty members are expected to maintain reasonable availability to address student questions regarding the test. 

The School of Pharmacy employs the following grading scale:

Percentage Grade GPA
90 and above 4.00
89 3.90
88 3.80
87 3.70
86 3.60
85 3.50
84 3.40
83 3.30
82 3.20
81 3.10
80 3.00
79 2.90
78 2.80
77 2.70
76 2.60
75 2.50
74 2.40
73 2.30
72 2.20
71 2.10
70 2.00
69 1.80
68 1.60
67 1.40
66 1.20
65 1.00
64 & below 0.00
F (Failure) 0.00
WF (Withdrawal/Failure) 0.00
NCF (Non-Completion Failure) 0.00
LP (Limited Progress) 0.00


Courses are rated at one credit hour for 10 hours of lecture, 15-20 hours of recitation/small group discussion, or 30 hours of laboratory/and or practice session.  A total of 2.0 credit hours will be assigned for each week of Intermediate Pharmacy Practice Experience/Rotation (IPPE) and 1.6 credit hours will be assigned for each week of advanced practice experiences/rotations (APPE).  A cumulative grade point average will be calculated and posted on the student’s transcript at the end of each academic quarter.  Class ranking information is available upon request from the Office of the Registrar.

The following symbols are used on grade reports, but are not used in the determination of a student’s grade point average:

EX Course exempted
PR Course credit earned through credit by examination
TR Course credit through transfer
P Pass
AU Audit
W Withdrawal, no grade penalty
WP Withdraw/Passing
WV Waiver for a course, does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA, does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions
WX Withdrawal,  never attended but registered (no course credit or residence credit).
I Incomplete
^ Caret Symbol, which denotes a developmental course grade

Grades or symbols of  “D,” “F,” “W,” “WP,” “WF,” “NCF” and “LP” can negatively affect one or more of the following and should be considered punitive in terms of a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP):  Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), Incremental Completion Rate (ICR) or Maximum Allowable Timeframe (MTF).  A grade of “C” may also be punitive in certain graduate and professional program courses requiring a grade of “B” or higher.  Refer to the catalog section on “Explanations of Related Issues” for additional information on calculation of CGPA, ICR, and MTF.

Repeating Courses

Students may repeat coursework to meet academic requirements. A student enrolled in developmental coursework (ENG0099 and MAT0099) must be able to successfully complete the course within their first three attempts or the student will be academically dismissed. The last grade received replaces any previous course grades in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average for graduation unless the last grade is one of the following: W, WX, or AU. When one of these is the last grade, the previous grade continues to be used in the GPA calculation. However, the cumulative grade point average for the calculation of honors at graduation will include all grades earned at South University. Students who are veterans can only receive veteran benefits when repeating courses for which failing grades were earned.

Grade Reporting and Challenges

Grade Reporting

Grade reports are made available to students at the end of each class. Students in online programs may request a grade report four days after the completion of each course from the Student Support center at studentsupport@southuniversity.edu.

Grade Challenges for All Programs Except School of Pharmacy

Any student wishing to challenge a final course grade must first discuss the grade with the faculty member of the course in question within 14 consecutive calendar days of the end of final week for on ground courses and within 14 consecutive calendar days of the end of the online session in writing. Challenges after that time will not be permitted, and the grade recorded on the official grade sheets will prevail.

For on-ground classes, if the grade challenge is denied in whole or in part by the faculty member and the student is not satisfied with the explanation for the denial, it may be appealed to the Department Chair/Program Director (whoever is located on the student’s campus) and thereafter, in succession, to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations on that campus, and then to the Dean of the College offering the course. The decision of the Dean of the College is considered final. Appeals of a decision rendered at any level must be received in writing by the person to whom the appeal is made within seven calendar days of the issuance of the decision at the previous level.

For online classes, if the grade challenge is denied in whole or in part by the faculty member, and the student is not satisfied with the explanation for the denial, the student should contact his/her Academic Counselor or Plus Lead to complete an appeal form that will be forwarded by the Academic Counselor or Plus Lead to the Online Department Chair/Program Director. If still not resolved to the student’s satisfaction at any level, the decision may be appealed, in succession, to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Online Academic Operations, and then to the Dean of the College offering the course. The decision of the Dean of the College is considered final. Appeals of a decision rendered at any level must be received in writing by the person to whom the appeal is made within seven calendar days of the issuance of the decision at the previous level.

Grade Challenges for School of Pharmacy

School of Pharmacy Academic Appeals Policy (Final Grade in a Course)

A student has the right to file a formal appeal if there is a disagreement with the final grade, which has been awarded in a course that is based on an appropriate concern.  The procedure for bringing an academic appeal is as follows:

  1. A formal appeal must be initiated within seven calendar days following the date final grades are posted for the term.  To initiate an appeal, the student must present the appeal in writing utilizing the appropriate School of Pharmacy Notification of Appeal Form to the faculty member in charge of the course.  Appeals submitted for consideration should have clearly stated grounds for such an appeal with objective support for consideration.
  2. Once the appeal is received by the course faculty member, it is his/her responsibility to forward the notification of the appeal to the appropriate Assistant Dean for Operations, the Registrar, and the Dean to inform them that a grade appeal has been filed.  After reviewing the student’s appeal, the faculty member will render a decision in writing no later than five calendar days after receiving the appeal.
  3. If the faculty member does not resolve the appeal, the student may forward the notification of appeal to the appropriate Assistant Dean for Operations within two calendar days.  After reviewing the student’s appeal, the Assistant Dean for Operations will render a decision in writing no later than ten five calendar days after receiving the appeal.
  4. If the Assistant Dean for Operations does not resolve the appeal, the student may present the notification of appeal to the Office of the Dean within two calendar days.  After reviewing the student’s appeal, the Dean or his designee will render a decision in writing no later than five calendar days after receiving the appeal.  The decision of the Dean of the School will be final.

Incomplete Policy

Incompletes are given at the discretion of the faculty member to any student who does not complete the course requirements. To receive an incomplete, the student must complete at least one-half of the course requirements; then, it is the student’s responsibility to complete the remainder of the required coursework.

Incomplete grades must be cleared within 14 consecutive calendar days of the end of session (unless special approval is received from the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations, or College/School Dean) or the incomplete will be changed to the grade earned. The final grade for the course will be designated on the transcript by the appropriate letter grade.

University Examinations/Culture of Assessment

South University seeks to provide an optimal learning experience for each of its students. To provide evidence of learning achievement in the classroom, students are required to participate in university-level assessment activities (e.g., Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills, course embedded assessment and portfolios) on an ongoing basis throughout their academic studies. Current university level assessment activities are focused on general education learning outcomes (skills in the areas of mathematics, communications, critical thinking, etc.) in the undergraduate programs, in addition to the learning assessment, which takes place in each academic program. The final formal examinations of general education skills occur before graduation, usually after students enter their final two quarters of their program. Students’ scores will not be factored into their GPA or entered on their transcript. Completion of these exams is an official University requirement for graduation.

Honors

Only work taken at South University will be considered in computing honors.

President’s List

Published quarterly, for term-based students, the President’s List honors those students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement. To be eligible for the President’s List, a student must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours and earn a grade point average of 4.00. Graduate students, except for those in the pharmacy program, are not included.

Dean’s List

Published quarterly, for term-based students, the Dean’s List honors those students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement. To be eligible for the dean’s list, a student must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours and earn a grade point average of 3.5 or above.

For undergraduate students in non-term based programs, eligibility for the President’s or Dean’s List is considered at the end of each payment period. At the end of a payment period, the grade point average will be evaluated for the grade point average levels as specified for the President’s or Dean’s List. A student is only evaluated once for periodic outstanding academic achievement at the end of a payment period.

Honors at Graduation

All work taken at South University will count in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average for honors at graduation. The calculation will include original and repeated course grades.

Undergraduate Honors

Cum Laude:  Undergraduate degree program students graduating with a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 through 3.69 will be graduated cum laude.

Magna cum Laude: Undergraduate degree program students graduating with a grade point average of 3.70 through 3.89 will be graduated magna cum laude.

Summa cum Laude: Undergraduate degree program students graduating with a grade point average of 3.90 through 4.00 will be graduated summa cum laude.

Graduate Recognition

Honors: Graduate degree program students graduating with a grade point average of 3.75 through 3.89 will be graduated with Honors.

High Honors: Graduate degree students graduating with a grade point average of 3.90 through 4.00 will graduate with High Honors

Graduation

Commencement Attendance

Students preparing for graduation are welcomed and encouraged to participate in their local campus ceremonies. Students in online programs are encouraged to participate in the Savannah, Georgia ceremony held each year in June. Students who choose to participate in the graduation ceremony must do so within twelve (12) months from the date of their degree completion.

Graduation Date Policy

Graduation dates and degree conferred will reflect the last day of the term in which the student completes the degree requirements.

Students who satisfy incompletes or other degree requirements after 14 calendar days from the end of the term or session will have their graduation and degree conferred dates reflect the day the academic requirements are completed.

Application for Graduation

It is the responsibility of each potential graduate to complete an application for graduation. The application should be submitted during the registration period two quarters before the anticipated graduation date. Fully online students should request and submit the graduation application to their Academic Advisor.

Graduation Requirements

Associate’s and Bachelor’s Degrees Program Graduation Requirements

To receive an associate’s or bachelor’s degree or certificate, (except for Nursing, Medical Assisting, Occupational Therapy Assistant, and Physical Therapist Assistant) a student must satisfy these four requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog.
  2. The student must receive a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses in the student’s major (i.e., those described in Area III of the program curriculum outlined in the University’s Academic Catalog).
  3. The student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher for all coursework taken at the University. The student must abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the University before graduation. Students in the baccalaureate degree nursing program must be able to meet the physical and mental demands per the statutory requirements of the State of Florida.
  4. The student must abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the University before graduation.
Associate of Science in Medical Assisting Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the Associate of Science in Medical Assisting program, a student must:

  1. The student normally must complete the course requirements described in the catalog in effect when the student enrolled. However, academic programs are subject to change at the discretion of the institution. Students who leave the university longer than one calendar year will be required to meet catalog requirements in effect at the time of their return;
  2. The student must receive a C or better in all major courses;
  3. The student must complete 40 percent of all required courses at South University. At least 50 percent of the major curriculum coursework must be completed at South University; The student must abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the university.
Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the Associate of Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant program, a student must:

  1. The student normally must complete the course requirements described in the catalog in effect when the student enrolled. However, academic programs are subject to change at the discretion of the institution. Students who leave the University longer than one calendar year will be required to meet catalog requirements in effect at the time of their return. Students may request department chair/coordinator approval for a course substitution or waiver. The registrar or dean of academic affairs must approve deviation from any program requirements.
  2. The student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or higher in all courses in the student’s major.
  3. The student must have achieved cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or higher for all coursework taken at the University.
  4. The student must abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the University before graduation.
Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the Associate of Science or the Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant program, a student must:

  1. Successfully complete the course requirements described in the Catalog.  Students who leave the University longer than one calendar year will be required to meet catalog requirements in effect at the time of their return.
  2. Complete all coursework in the technical phase of the program with a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 2.50 and a minimum grade of C (or passing grade) in all courses.
  3. Abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the University before graduation.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN and RN to BSN) programs Graduation Requirements

To graduate from the Undergraduate nursing programs (Nursing RN to BSN and BSN) a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. The student must successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog in effect when the student enrolled. Students withdrawn from the university one year or longer will be required to meet the program requirements in effect at the time of their return.
  2. Passing grades in all nursing lab and practice courses.
  3. Grades of “C” or higher in all nursing courses.
  4. A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.5 or higher.
  5. Satisfactorily complete comprehensive achievement examinations.
  6. Pre-licensure Nursing Students must complete NCLEX review courses.
Master of Science in Criminal Justice Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program, a student must:

  1. Successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog in effect when the student enrolled in South University.
  2. Complete all course work in the degree program with a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 3.0 and no course grade below a C.
Doctor of Business Administration Graduation Requirements

To receive the Doctor of Business Administration degree, a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the course requirements described in the catalog in effect when the student enrolled in the program. A student who leaves South University longer than three quarters will be required to meet catalog requirements in effect at the time of his/her return.
  2. Possess a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher, with no grade below a B.
  3. Successfully complete the requirements of the required DBA Residencies.
  4. Successfully complete the requirements (with a Pass or High Pass) of the DBA Preliminary Examination.
  5. Successfully complete the requirements of the DBA Doctoral Dissertation.
College of Business Graduation Requirements for Masters Programs Policy

In order to graduate from the Master of Science in Accounting, the Master of Business Administration, the Accelerated Master of Business Administration, the Master of Business Administration in Healthcare Administration, the Accelerated Master of Business Administration in Healthcare Administration, the Master of Healthcare Administration, the Master of Science in Human Resource Management,  the Master of Science in Information Systems, the Master of Science in Leadership, or the Master of Public Administration, a student must satisfy these requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog.
  2. Complete all course work in the program with a cumulative grade point average (CPGA) of at least 3.0
  3. Complete all course work in the program with no grade below a C.
Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Accounting to the Master of Science in Accounting (BSA to MSA) Program

In order to graduate from the BSA to MSA Program, a student must satisfy these requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog.
  2. Complete all graduate course work in the program with a cumulative grade point average (CPGA) of at least 3.0
  3. Complete all graduate course work in the program with no grade below a C.
Doctor of Occupational Therapy Graduation Requirements

To receive a Doctor of Occupational Therapy degree, a student must:

  1. Currently not be on clinical or professional probation.
  2. Complete the mandated credit hours (graduate credits) specifically approved by the program, within six (6) years. Beyond this time-frame, coursework will need to be repeated so as to keep up with new practice and professional information.
  3. Complete the Doctor of Occupational Therapy program degree requirements with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0.
  4. Satisfactorily meet all financial and library obligations of the university.
Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, a student must:

  1. Evidence a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater for all academic work required for the degree.
  2. Successfully pass the Comprehensive Examination process.
  3. Successfully remediate or repeat all courses in which a grade lower than a “C” was earned.
  4. Successfully meet all conditions of a remediation plan(s) as provided by the Progress Promotions Policy during periods of probation or suspension.

*Please refer to the Graduate Student Handbook for the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program for additional information regarding the Progress Promotions Policy.

Master in Medical Science in Anesthesia Science Graduation Requirements
  1. The student must complete the course requirements described in the catalog in effect when the student was enrolled.
  2. The student must successfully meet the standards for Academic, Clinical and Professional Performance.
  3. Students must maintain an overall CGPA of 2.5 at the time of graduation.
  4. Student must be in good standing at the time of graduation; - i.e. not be on any type of warning or probationary status at the conclusion of their final quarter of enrollment.
Master of Science in Physician Assistant Degree Program Graduation Requirements

To receive a Master of Science in Physician Assistant degree a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. The student normally must complete the course requirements described in the catalog in effect when the student enrolled. Students who leave South University longer than 3 quarters will be required to meet catalog requirements in effect at the time of their return.
  2. The student must receive a minimum grade of “C” or better in all courses.
  3. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher for all coursework taken while in the South University Physician Assistant program.
  4. The student must successfully complete the summative evaluation before graduation.
Doctor of Nursing Practice, Post Graduate Certificates, Master of Science in Nursing and the RN to Master of Science in Nursing Graduation Requirements

To graduate from the South University College of Nursing graduate program a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. The student must successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog in effect when the student enrolled. Students withdrawn from the University one year or longer will be required to meet the program requirements in effect at the time of their return.
  2. The student must successfully complete the required number of clinical practice hours and receive a satisfactory clinical performance evaluation.
  3. A letter grade of “B” or higher in all courses through the entire program of study (inclusive of undergraduate and graduate courses).
  4. A CGPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
Master of Public Health Graduation Requirements

To receive the Master of Public Health degree, a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the program requirements described in the Catalog in effect when the student enrolled in the program. This includes both the core courses (PHE5001, PHE5005, PHE5010, PHE5015, PHE5020), principal courses (PHE6201, PHE6202, PHE6203, PHE6210, PHE6220, PHE6250, PHE6402, PHE6404) and the practicum experience (PHE6980). 
  2. A student who leaves South University for one year or longer will be required to meet the program requirements in effect at the time of his/her return.
  3. Complete all course work in the degree program with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0.
  4. Successfully repeat all courses in which a grade lower than a “C” was earned.
  5. Successfully complete the required number of public health practicum hours and receive a satisfactory performance evaluation.
  6. Abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the University before graduation.
Doctor of Ministry Graduation Requirements

To receive the Doctor of Ministry degree, a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the course requirements described in the catalog. A student who leaves South University longer than three quarters will be required to meet catalog requirements in effect at the time of his/her return.
  2. Possess a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and complete all coursework in the program with no grade below a C.  Successfully complete a portfolio review at mid-point (48 credit hours completed, Standard Track only) and the end of the program (all students).
  3. Abide by all University rules and regulations and settle any financial obligations to the University before graduation. 
School of Pharmacy Graduation Requirements

Students who have satisfactorily completed all academic requirements and who have been recommended by  the School of Pharmacy faculty (as indicated by the successful completion of the School of Pharmacy curriculum) may be awarded the Doctor of Pharmacy degree, provided that they are of good moral character and have met the following standards. They must:

  1. Have successfully remediated all course scores of 0.00 (F).
  2. Have completed the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum with no less than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average.
  3. Have satisfactorily completed four academic years of residence in a school of pharmacy that is either fully ACPE accredited or has ACPE pre-candidate or candidate status, the final two academic years of which must be completed at South University School of Pharmacy.
  4. Have completed all Interprofessional Education and Community Service requirements.
  5. Have completed all legal and financial requirements of the School of Pharmacy.
  6. Have exhibited the ethical, professional, behavioral, and personal characteristics necessary for the practice of pharmacy.
  7. Have completed an exit interview with the Office of Financial Aid if the student is a recipient of any form of financial aid.

Posthumous Degrees

South University will award a posthumous degree if a student, at the time of his/her death, had not completed degree requirements but was actively enrolled at the University, was in good academic standing, and had completed approximately two-thirds of the requirements for the program. Next of kin of the deceased student may request, in writing, consideration for a posthumous degree to the College/School Dean. If the degree is awarded, and the next of kin desires, the deceased student’s name can be read at the next commencement ceremony. In such cases a diploma will be provided free of charge.

Policies for Second Degrees

Requirements for a Second Undergraduate Degree

Students may earn a second baccalaureate degree by fulfilling all of the degree requirements for both degrees including all general education and program requirements. Meeting the requirements for the second baccalaureate degree includes earning a minimum of 64 credit hours beyond those required for the first degree, with a minimum of 244 credit hours total earned for both baccalaureate degrees. Students are subject to the satisfactory academic progress, graduation requirements, and all other academic policies and procedures of the first baccalaureate degree until those requirements for the first degree are complete. Once the first baccalaureate degree is complete, students are subject to the satisfactory academic progress, graduation requirements, and all other academic policies and procedures of the second baccalaureate degree until those requirements for the second degree are complete.

Students must declare their intent to seek a second baccalaureate degree in writing to the registrar for campus-based students or their Academic Counselor for student in online programs and the program director so that they may be properly advised as to the requirements for both baccalaureate degree programs. Once the requirements for each baccalaureate degree are successfully completed, the student’s transcript will show the degree’s completion and a diploma will be issued for the degree. Note that South University does not allow double baccalaureate majors.

Students may earn a second associate’s degree by fulfilling all of the degree requirements for both degrees including all general education and program requirements. Meeting the requirements for the second associate’s degree includes earning a minimum of 24 credit hours beyond those required for the first degree, with a minimum of 116 credit hours total earned for both associate’s degrees. Students are subject to the satisfactory academic progress, graduation requirements, and all other academic policies and procedures of the first associate’s degree until those requirements for the first degree are complete. Once the first associate’s degree is complete, students are subject to the satisfactory academic progress, graduation requirements, and all other academic policies and procedures of the second associate degree until those requirements for the second degree are complete.

Students must declare their intent to seek a second associate’s degree in writing to the registrar for campus-based students or their Academic Counselor for student in online programs  and the program director so that they may be properly advised as to the requirements for both associate’s degree programs. Once the requirements for each associate’s degree are successfully completed, the student’s transcript will show the degree’s completion and a diploma will be issued for the degree. Note that South University does not allow double associate’s degree majors.

Students may earn a second specialization or concentration within a degree program by completing the courses required for both specializations or concentrations. However, completion of the courses required for a second specialization or concentration within a degree program does not satisfy the requirements for a second degree. Requests for completing a second specialization or concentration must be submitted to the Program Director in consultation with the Campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations for campus-based students or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Online Academic Operations for students in online programs prior to the student’s graduation.

Students who have previously earned a degree at another institution may not seek a second degree from South University at the same degree level and in the same program.

Requirements for a Second Graduate Degree

Students may normally earn only one graduate degree at South University. Students may request permission to pursue a second graduate degree in a field of study unrelated to their first program of study, but must do so in writing and receive approval from the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. No more than 12 credit hours of previously earned coursework may be applied to the second degree.

Students may earn a second specialization or concentration within a degree program by completing the courses required for both specializations or concentrations. However, completion of the courses required for a second specialization or concentration within a degree program does not satisfy the requirements for a second degree. Requests for completing a second specialization or concentration must be submitted to the Program Director in consultation with the Campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations for campus-based students or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Online Academic Operations for students in online programs prior to the student’s graduation.

Students who have previously earned a degree at another institution may not seek a second degree, from South University at the same degree level and in the same program.  For example, students with a Master of Business Administration may not apply to South University’s Master of Business Administration program.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Summary

A student must demonstrate Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress by successfully completing courses attempted. Completing courses with “C” or better grades indicates academic progress. Poor performance such as receiving “D” or lower, withdrawing from a course, and/or being dismissed from a course may put students at risk. Poor performance may lead to an academic/financial aid warning and/or academic dismissal from the University. It is very important that students attend all registered courses and complete them successfully.

The following criteria are used to determine whether or not a student is making academic/financial aid progress, where a student must be able to:

  • Maintain a minimum acceptable cumulative grade point average (CGPA);
  • Achieve the minimum incremental completion rate (ICR); and
  • Complete the program within a maximum allowable timeframe (MTF).

Administrative actions will be taken when a student fails to meet the minimum standards of any of the above criteria. If the action results in academic dismissal from the University, a student may appeal the dismissal. If the appeal is denied, the student will be academically dismissed from the University.

Periods of attendance when a student does not receive financial aid are included in determining academic/financial aid progress. Periods of nonattendance are not included in determining Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress. While the terms Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning and Academic Probation/Financial Aid Probation are used, the status applies to all students whether receiving financial aid or not.

Regardless of a student’s status in relation to academic/financial aid progress, the student must meet the graduation requirements for his/her specific program in order to graduate from the University.

The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy contains the following sections:

  1. Criteria for Honor Designations
  2. Minimum Standards for Undergraduate Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress and
  3. Consequences for Failing to Meet Minimum Standards
  4. Minimum Standards for Graduate Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress and Consequences for Failing to Meet Minimum Standards
  5. Procedures for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal
  6. Procedures for Readmission after Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal
  7. Explanations of Related Issues

The University has the right to modify the Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress policy at any time.

I.  Criteria for Honor Designations

South University is proud to honor those students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement in their programs of study. Honors are evaluated during a student’s academic program (for undergraduate students only) and after successful completion of his/her academic program. Only courses taken at South

University will be considered in evaluating and computing honors.

a.)  Honors during a Student’s Academic Program

South University honors undergraduate students for their periodic outstanding academic achievement through the President’s List and the Dean’s List. To be eligible for the President’s List, a student must achieve a grade point average of 4.00 for the courses completed during the evaluation period. To be eligible for the Dean’s List, a student must achieve a grade point average greater than or equal to 3.50 and less than 4.00 for the courses completed during the evaluation period.

For undergraduate students in term-based programs, the President’s and Dean’s Lists are published quarterly. To be eligible for the President’s List, a student must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours (non-developmental courses) during the quarter and earn the appropriate grade point average specified above. To be eligible for the Dean’s List, a student must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours (non-developmental courses) during the quarter and earn the appropriate grade point average specified above.

For undergraduate students in non-term based programs, eligibility for the President’s or Dean’s List is considered at the end of each payment period. At the end of a payment period, the grade point average at the end of the student’s payment period will be evaluated for the grade point average levels as specified for the President’s or Dean’s List. A student is only evaluated once for periodic outstanding academic achievement at the end of a payment period.

After attempting the total number of credit hours specified, the grade point average for a student’s most recently attempted 18 credit hours are evaluated for the grade point average levels as specified for the President’s or Dean’s List. A student is only evaluated once for periodic outstanding academic achievement at each evaluation point.

b.)  Honors at Graduation

South University honors students for their outstanding academic achievement upon successful completion of all graduation requirements. All non-developmental courses taken at South University will count in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average for honors at graduation. The calculation will include original and repeated course grades.

For students in undergraduate programs, honors at graduation include:

  • Summa Cum Laude: Undergraduate degree students graduating with a grade point average greater than or equal to 3.90 through 4.00 will be graduated Summa cum Laude.
  • Magna Cum Laude: Undergraduate degree students graduating with a grade point average greater than or equal to 3.70 but less than 3.90 will be graduated Magna cum Laude.
  • Cum Laude: Undergraduate degree students graduating with a cumulative grade point average greater than or equal to 3.50 but less than 3.70 will be graduated Cum Laude.

For students in graduate programs, honors at graduation include:

  • Honors: Graduate degree students graduating with a cumulative grade point average of 3.75 through 3.89 will be graduated with Honors.
  • High Honors: Graduate degree students graduating with a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 through 4.00 will graduate with High Honors.

II.  Minimum Standards for Undergraduate Academic/Financial Aid Progress and Consequences for Failing to Meet Minimum Standards

To maintain academic progress, each undergraduate student must meet the required minimum standards of the following three criteria:

  • Maintain a minimum acceptable cumulative grade point average (CGPA);
  • Achieve the minimum incremental completion rate (ICR); and
  • Complete the program within a maximum allowable timeframe (MTF).

a)  All Undergraduate Term-Based Programs (Except Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant and Physical Therapist Assistant)

Students in term-based undergraduate programs who start or re-enter at mid-quarter will have that mid-quarter count as an entire quarter for Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress purposes.

The following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each undergraduate student’s academic performance. The evaluation points are at every academic year:

  • After attempting his/her first academic year (an academic year is three quarters in which courses are attempted in each quarter), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.50 and an ICR of 33.33 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting his/her second academic year, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • Starting the quarter after the second academic year, and every subsequent quarter, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.00 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first two quarters of attendance. Students in online programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first four sessions of attendance. Such students must successfully complete any required developmental course within their first three attempts of that course or the student will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in term-based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their second quarter of enrollment, or students in non-term based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their first four sessions of attendance will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their fourth quarter of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in non-term based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their eighth session of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students who receive a WX in a developmental course are considered to have not attempted the course since they registered for the course but never attended.Students who receive a WV in a course are considered to have not attempted the course; WV does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA and does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

An undergraduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

b)  Bachelor of Science in Nursing

For undergraduate students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and Nursing RN to BSN program, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance. The evaluation points are at every academic year:

  • After attempting the 1st quarter of the nursing program (for term-based students) or first payment period of the nursing program (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 50%. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting the 2nd quarter (for term-based students) or second payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 66.67%. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically removed from the University.
  • After attempting each subsequent quarter (for term-based students) or subsequent payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50 and an ICR of 66.67%. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically removed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first two quarters of attendance. Students in non-term based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first four sessions of attendance. Such students must successfully complete any required developmental course within their first three attempts of that course or the student will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in term-based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their second quarter of enrollment, or students in non-term based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their first four session of attendance will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their fourth quarter of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in non-term based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their eighth session of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students who receive a WX in a developmental course are considered to have not attempted the course since they registered for the course but never attended.  Students who receive a WV in a course are considered to have not attempted the course; WV does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA and does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

An undergraduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

c)  Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant

For undergraduate students in the Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant program, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance.

  • After attempting his/her first academic year (an academic year is three quarters in which courses are attempted in each quarter)  a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be academically dismissed from the University.

NOTE: The minimum CGPA required to be eligible to apply to the professional phase of the OTA program is 2.85.

  • After attempting his/her second academic year, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be dismissed from the university. 

NOTE: If a student is on academic warning/financial aid warning for failing to meet the ICR requirement, it will be very difficult for him/her to meet the ICR standard of 50 percent. In some cases, the student may have to successfully complete all the courses attempted. A student should consult with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor on the exact requirements.

  • Starting the quarter after the second academic year, and every subsequent quarter, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first two quarters of attendance. Students innon-term based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first four sessions of attendance. Such students must successfully complete any required developmental course within their first three attempts of that course or the student will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in term-based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their second quarter of enrollment, or students in non-term based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their first four sessions of attendance will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their fourth quarter of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in non-term based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their eighth session of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students who receive a WX in a developmental course are considered to have not attempted the course since they registered for the course but never attended. Students who receive a WV in a course are considered to have not attempted the course; WV does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA and does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

An undergraduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

d)  Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant

For undergraduate students in the Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance.

  • After attempting the 1st quarter  a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 33.33 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting the 2nd quarter a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.25 and an ICR of 50 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/ financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically removed from the University.

NOTE: If a student is on academic warning/financial aid warning for failing to meet the ICR requirement, it will be very difficult for him/her to meet the ICR standard of 50 percent. In some cases the student may have to successfully complete all the courses attempted. A student should consult with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor on the exact requirements.

  • After attempting each subsequent quarter a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically removed from the University.

NOTE: The minimum CGPA required to be eligible to apply to the technical phase of the PTA program is 2.85.

Students in term-based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first two quarters of attendance. Applicants who are required to take developmental coursework in English (ENG0099 Principles of Composition) or Mathematics (MAT0099 Principles of Algebra) are also required to take Strategies for Success (UVC1000).   Such students must successfully complete any required developmental course within their first three attempts of that course or the student will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in term-based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their second quarter of enrollment, or students in non-term based programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their first four session of attendance will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their fourth quarter of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in online programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their eighth session of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students who receive a WX in a developmental course are considered to have not attempted the course since they registered for the course but never attended.Students who receive a WV in a course are considered to have not attempted the course; WV does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA and does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid. An undergraduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

e)  All Undergraduate programs for students in non-term programs (Except Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant and Physical Therapist Assisting)

The following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each undergraduate student’s academic performance. The evaluation points are at the successful conclusion of every payment period.

  • After attempting his/her first payment period, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.25 and an ICR of 33.33 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting his/her second payment period, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.50 and an ICR of 50 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting his/her third payment period, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.75 and an ICR of 50.00 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting his/her fourth payment period, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.00 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

NOTE: If a student is on academic warning/financial aid warning for failing to meet the ICR requirement, it will be very difficult for him/her to meet the ICR standard of 66.67 percent. In some cases the student may have to successfully complete all the courses attempted. A student should consult with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor on the exact requirements.

  • After attempting each subsequent payment period, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.00 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first two quarters of attendance. Students in non-term based programs who require a developmental course or courses (ENG0099 or MAT0099 or both) must enroll in those courses during their first four sessions of attendance. Such students must successfully complete any required developmental course within their first three attempts of that course or the student will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in term programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their second quarter of enrollment, or students in online programs who have not attempted all required developmental courses by the end of their first four sessions of attendance will be academically dismissed from the University.

Students in term-based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their fourth quarter of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students in non-term based programs who have not successfully completed all required developmental courses by the end of their eighth session of enrollment will be academically dismissed from the University. Students who receive a WX in a developmental course are considered to have not attempted the course since they registered for the course but never attended.  Students who receive a WV in a course are considered to have not attempted the course; WV does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA and does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

An undergraduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

III. Minimum Standards for Graduate Academic/Financial Aid Progress and Consequences for Failing to Meet Minimum Standards

To maintain academic progress, each graduate student must meet the required minimum standards of the following three criteria:

  • Maintain a minimum acceptable cumulative grade point average (CGPA);
  • Achieve the minimum incremental completion rate (ICR); and
  • Complete the program within a maximum allowable timeframe (MTF).

Students in on-campus programs who start or re-enter at mid-quarter will have that mid-quarter count as an entire quarter for Satisfactory Academic/Financial Aid Progress purposes.

a)  All Graduate Programs (Except for the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Science, Master of Science in Physician Assistant, RN to Master of Science in Nursing, Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor of Ministry and Doctor of Pharmacy Programs). 

For all graduate students (except for those graduate students in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Sciences, Master of Science in Physician Assistant, RN to Master of Science of Nursing, Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor of Ministry and Doctor of Pharmacy programs described in b)., c)., d)., e)., f)., and g). below, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance. The evaluation points are at every quarter (for students in on-campus programs) or at the successful conclusion of every payment period (for students in online programs):

  • After attempting his/her first quarter (for  term-based students) or first payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 50.00 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting his/her second quarter (for term-based students) or second payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 50.00 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting each subsequent quarter (for term-based students) or subsequent payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

NOTE: If a student is on academic warning/financial aid warning for failing to meet the ICR requirement, it will be very difficult for him/her to meet the ICR standard of 66.67 percent. In some cases the student may have to successfully complete all the courses attempted. A student should consult with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor on the exact requirements.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

A graduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

b) Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Science

For graduate students in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Sciences program, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance:

  • After attempting his/her first quarter, a student in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Sciences program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50, achieve an academic quarter minimum GPA of 2.50, not receive a final grade of “F” for any course taken during the current quarter, not receive a final grade of “D” for any two courses taken during the current quarter, achieve satisfactory clinical performance, and receive an ICR of 50.00 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting his/her second quarter, and each subsequent quarter, a student in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Sciences program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.50, achieve an academic quarter minimum GPA of 2.50, not receive a final grade of “F” for any course taken during the quarter, not receive a final grade of “D” for any two courses taken during the quarter, achieve satisfactory clinical performance, and receive an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

NOTE: If a student in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Science program is on academic warning/financial aid warning for failing to meet the ICR requirement, it will be very difficult for him/her to meet the ICR standard of 66.67 percent. In some cases the student may have to successfully complete all the courses attempted. A student should consult with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor on the exact requirements.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

A graduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

c) Master of Science in Physician Assistant

For graduate students in the Master of Science in Physician Assistant program, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance:

  • After attempting his/her first quarter, a student in the Master of Science in Physician Assistant program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 100 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting each subsequent quarter, a student in the Master of Science in Physician Assistant program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 100 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

A graduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

d)  RN to Master of Science in Nursing

For students in the RN to Master of Science in Nursing, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance.

  • After attempting his/her first quarter of the RN to MSN program (for term-based students) or first payment period of the RN to MSN program (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 50 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting his/her second quarter (for term-based students) or second payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting his/her third quarter (for term-based students) or third payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting his/her fourth quarter (for term-based students) or fourth payment period (for onl non-term based ine students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.75 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting each subsequent quarter (for term-based students) or subsequent payment period (for non-term based students), a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.0 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter or payment period of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

A graduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

e)  Doctor of Business Administration and Doctor of Ministry

For graduate students in the Doctor of Business Administration and Doctor of Ministry programs, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance:

  • After attempting his/her first quarter, a student must achieve a CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 50.00 percent.  A student not achieving these minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting his/her second quarter, a student must achieve a CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 50.00 percent.  A student not achieving these minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.  If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter of academic warning/financial aid warning, he or she will be academically dismissed from the University. 
  • After attempting each subsequent quarter, a student must achieve a CGPA of 3.00 and an ICR of 66.67 percent.  A student not achieving these minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.  If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter of academic warning/financial aid warning, he or she will be academically dismissed from the University. 
  • The grade of LP for final project and dissertation courses are exempted from the CGPA for SAP purposes.

f)  Doctor of Pharmacy

For graduate students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program, the following evaluation points and minimum standards are used to assess each student’s academic performance:

  • After attempting his/her first quarter, a student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.00 and an ICR of 50.00 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid.
  • After attempting his/her second quarter, a student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.00 and an ICR of 50.00 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.
  • After attempting each subsequent quarter, a student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.00 and an ICR of 66.67 percent. A student not achieving these minimum standards of SAP will be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning and will continue to be eligible for financial aid. If a student who is already on academic warning/financial aid warning fails to achieve these minimum standards of SAP following a quarter of academic warning/financial aid warning, s/he will be academically dismissed from the University.

NOTE: If a student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program is on academic warning/financial aid warning for failing to meet the ICR requirement, it will be very difficult for him/her to meet the ICR standard of 66.67 percent. In some cases the student may have to successfully complete all the courses attempted. A student should consult with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor on the exact requirements.

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

A graduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

g)  All Graduate Programs

Maximum Time Frame (MTF): A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in academic dismissal for violating the MTF. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can occur at any time.

Students who have not met the minimum standards of SAP will be notified in writing by the University. Students on academic warning/financial aid warning are considered to be making progress towards meeting SAP and, if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for financial aid.

A graduate student in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Sciences program may be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning not more than two separate times (but not for two consecutive quarters) during his/her academic program. A graduate student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program may be placed on academic warning/financial aid warning not more than three separate times (but not for two consecutive quarters) during his/her academic program.

A graduate student may be academically dismissed for academic/financial aid reasons without a previous academic warning/financial aid warning. Students will be notified in writing if they are dismissed from the University.

IV.  Procedures for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal

Undergraduate and graduate students in on-campus programs wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to their campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations. Undergraduate and graduate students in online programs wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to their Academic Counselor. Graduate students in the Anesthesiologist Assistant program (Anesthesia Science (MMSc) degree program) wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to the Progress and Promotions Committee within the Department of Anesthesiologist Assistant Studies. Graduate students in the Master of Science in Physician Assistant program wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to the Student Progress Committee within the Department of Physician Assistant. Graduate students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to the Professional Performance Committee within the School of Pharmacy.

The student’s written appeal (including emails from a student’s email account bearing his/her electronic signature) must state the mitigating circumstances that contributed to the dismissal. The appeal must be supported with appropriate written documentation of the mitigating circumstances with explanation on how the circumstances have been remedied or changed that will allow the student to meet academic/financial aid progress. Mitigating circumstances are events that are outside the student’s control and are unavoidable. Following is an example list of events that indicate there may be a mitigating circumstance that has negatively impacted academic/financial aid progress:

  • Death of an immediate family member.
  • Serious or chronic student illness (this includes mental health issues).
  • Illness of an immediate family member where the student is a primary caretaker.
  • Illness of an immediate family member where the family member is the primary financial support.
  • Abusive relationships.
  • Divorce proceedings.
  • Previously undocumented disability.
  • Natural disaster.
  • Financial hardship such as foreclosure or eviction.
  • Special Circumstances
  • Military deployment of the student, his/her spouse, or a dependent student’s parent.
  • Military Permanent Change of Station (PCS).
     

NOTE: A student’s life issues and the student’s transition to college are not considered mitigating circumstances under this policy since a student has at least two quarters/two payment periods to adjust to college life.

The campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations (for students in on-campus programs), the Appeals Committee (for students in online programs), the Progress and Promotions Committee (for students in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Science program), the Student Progress Committee (for students in the Master of Science in Physician Assistant program), or the Professional Performance Committee (for students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program) will review the student’s appeal and related written documentation to determine whether the circumstances and academic status warrant consideration for granting the appeal. Any consideration of mitigating circumstances not specified above should be discussed with relevant College/School Dean. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is the final authority to which an academic dismissal can be appealed.

Failure to provide an adequate written appeal and supporting documentation will result in the student’s appeal not being considered. The student will be notified in writing that the appeal is not being considered and what additional information is needed for the appeal to be considered. This is not considered a denial of an appeal which would force the student to wait a year before appealing again.

A student who submits a written appeal and is granted the appeal will be placed on academic probation/financial aid probation at the start of the quarter or course session in which s/he resumes coursework. A student is on probation for one quarter in a term-based program or one payment period in a non-term based program.  During the probationary period a student may receive (if otherwise eligible) financial aid for one quarter.

Prior to and during the probationary period, the student must agree with and sign a written academic plan developed by the University on how the student will achieve specific minimum CGPA, ICR, and other applicable SAP standards associated with the appropriate evaluation points by end of either the Academic/Financial Aid Probation period or by the end of the quarter included in the Academic Plan. The Academic Plan must detail specific time frames and student success measures and cannot be greater than two (2) quarters for the student to meet the minimum requirements of Satisfactory Academic Progress. The Academic Plan must be reviewed with the student so that designated Academic Plan is being met and the student will remain on track to achieve the success measures within the approved timeframe. For students in degree programs that may have an Academic Plan for more than one quarter, the student must meet the academic targets of the Academic Plan at the end the first quarter when the student is on Academic/Financial Aid Probation and by the end of the Academic Plan, the student must meet the minimum requirements of Satisfactory Academic Progress.  If the student meets the academic goals and requirements under the Academic Plan for the first quarter while on Academic/Financial Aid Probation, he or she may complete the second quarter under the Academic Plan and be eligible to receive financial aid.   Failure to meet the established goals included in the Academic Plan will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.

A student who submits a written appeal and is denied the appeal cannot re-appeal for one year after the quarter or course session in which the appeal was denied however the passage of time by itself does not impact the Appeal Committee’s decision.

An individual graduate program may have additional specific procedures for appealing an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal which are more stringent than the above Procedures for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.

Students dismissed for violating the maximum allowable timeframe (MTF), may appeal to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 

The result of the appeal (whether granted or denied) will be provided in writing to the student and recorded in the student’s academic file by the University.

V.  Procedures for Readmission after Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal

After one year of remaining out of the University, undergraduate and graduate students can submit an additional written appeal for reinstatement. Undergraduate or graduate students in on-campus programs wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to their campus Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations. Undergraduate and graduate students in online programs wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to their Academic Counselor. Graduate students in the Master of Medical Science in Anesthesia Sciences program and the Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies programs cannot submit such an appeal for reinstatement. Graduate students in the Doctor of Ministry program must do so in writing to the Progress and Promotions Committee of the College of Theology. Graduate students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program wishing to appeal an academic dismissal/financial aid dismissal must do so in writing to the Professional Performance Committee within the School of Pharmacy.

The second written appeal must be accompanied by a written discussion (and demonstration) of accomplishments or changes made in the prior year that will allow the student to meet academic/financial aid progress. In addition they must demonstrate how former mitigating circumstances will no longer impact their academic performance.

A student who submits a second written appeal and is granted the appeal will be placed on academic probation/financial aid probation at the start of the quarter or course session in which s/he resumes coursework. During the probationary period (which lasts up to one quarter for a student in a term-based program or one payment period for a student in a non-term based program), a student may receive (if otherwise eligible) financial aid. Prior to and during the probationary period, the student must agree with and sign a written academic plan developed by the University on how the student will achieve specific minimum CGPA, ICR, and other applicable SAP standards associated with the appropriate evaluation points.

For students in degree programs that may have an Academic Plan for more than one quarter or payment period, the student must meet the academic targets of the Academic Plan at the end the first quarter or payment period when the student is on Academic/Financial Aid Probation and by the end of the Academic Plan, the student must meet the minimum requirements of Satisfactory Academic Progress.  If the student meets the academic goals and requirements under the Academic Plan for the first quarter or payment period while on Academic/Financial Aid Probation, he or she may complete the second quarter or payment period under the Academic Plan and be eligible to receive financial aid.   Failure to meet the established goals included in the Academic Plan will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.  

Should the student have his/her second appeal denied, the student will be permanently dismissed from the University. The result of the second appeal (whether granted or denied) will be provided in writing to the student and recorded in the student’s academic file by the University.

VI.  Explanations of Related Issues

a.) Calculation of Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

A student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is calculated by:

  • Multiplying credits for each course by grade points associated with the grade earned;
  • Totaling the grade points earned for all the courses; and
  • Dividing total grade points earned by the total number of quality credits.
  • Grades of “A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “F”, “LP”, “NCF” and “WF” in c) below are included in a student’s CGPA.
  • Grades and symbols of “EX”, “PR”, “TR”, “P”, “AU”, “W”, “WP”, “WX”, “I”, and “^” in c) below are not included in a student’s CGPA.

 

b.) Calculation of Incremental Completion Rate (ICR)

A student’s incremental completion rate (ICR) is calculated by:

  • Totaling the number of credit hours attempted;
  • Totaling the number of credit hours successfully completed; and
  • Dividing the total number of credit hours successfully completed by the total number of credit hours attempted.
  • Grades and symbols of “A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “F”, “LP”, “NCF”, “TR”, “W”, “WP”, “WF”, “P”, “I” and ^ in c) below are included in a student’s ICR.
  • Grades of “EX”, “PR”, “AU”, and “WX”, in c) below are not included in a student’s ICR.

 

c.)  Grading System

Grade A
Quality Points 4.0
Range 90-100
Interpretation: Excellent

Grade B
Quality Points 3.0
Range 80-89
Interpretation: Above Average

Grade C
Quality Points 2.0
Range 70-79
Interpretation: Average

Grade D
Quality Points 1.0
Range 60-69
Interpretation: Minimum Passing

Grade F
Quality Points 0.0
Range 0-59
Interpretation: Failure

Grade WF
Quality Points 0.0
Range 0
Interpretation: Withdraw/Failure

Grade NCF
Quality Points 0.0
Range 0
Interpretation: Non-Completion Failure

 Grade LP*
Quality Points 0.0
Range 33-79
Interpretation: Limited Progress

*Note: The grade of LP may be awarded in Pass/Fail courses. Students who complete the remaining assignments in the extension course receive a letter grade or grade of P and the grade for the original dissertation course is changed to a letter grade or to P.  Students who complete at least half of the remaining assignments may be awarded the grade of LP and then register for a subsequent extension course. Students who do not make adequate progress receive a grade of F and the grade for the original dissertation course is changed to a grade of F. 

The following symbols are used on grade reports, but are not used in the determination of a student’s grade point average:

EX
Interpretation: Course exempted

PR
Interpretation: Course credit earned through credit by examination

TR
Interpretation: Course credit earned through transfer

P
Interpretation: Pass

AU
Interpretation: Audit

W
Interpretation: Withdrawal, no grade penalty

WP
Interpretation: Withdraw/Passing

WV
Waiver for a course; does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA, does not count as an attempt for programmatic progressions

WX
Interpretation: Withdrawal, never attended but registered (no course credit or residence credit)

I
Interpretation: Incomplete

^
Interpretation: Caret symbol, which denotes a developmental course grade

d.)  Course Attempts

A course attempt includes any time a student receives a grade for a course. This includes the letter grades of “A” through “F”, a passing grade of “P”, an incomplete grade of “I”, a withdrawal while passing the course of “WP”, a withdrawal while failing the course of “WF”, and a withdrawal with no grade penalty of “W”. Courses for which a student enrolls but then drops during the drop/add period at the beginning of a quarter or course session is not counted as a course attempt.

e.)  Maximum Allowable Timeframe (MTF)

A student may not attempt more than 150 percent of the credits in his/her program; anything in excess of 150 percent of the credits will result in the student’s academic dismissal from the University. The appeal process and related procedures are the same as those described in sections III., IV., and V. above.

f.)  Developmental Courses

South University requires academic placement tests. Depending on test scores, students may be required to take developmental courses (i.e., ENG0099 and MAT0099). If so required, a student must successfully complete such courses in order to progress within the program. Developmental course credits do not count towards the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the CGPA; however, they do count in determining the maximum time frame and the ICR.

g.)  Repeated Courses and Grades

Grades achieved in repeated classes will replace withdrawn or failing grades. Withdrawn and failing grades are included in the maximum allowable time frame and ICR. The grade “I” indicates Incomplete and is calculated as if it is an “F” for CGPA and ICR purposes until it is changed to another grade. A student may also retake a class in which s/he received a passing grade in order to improve his/her CGPA. An undergraduate student enrolled in developmental coursework (ENG0099 and MAT0099) must be able to pass the courses within three attempts or the student will be academically dismissed. Note that graduate students enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy program will have all course grades (including repeated courses) included in the calculation of the CGPA.

h.)  Remediation of Academic Deficiencies

It is strongly recommended that any student with withdrawn or failing grades register for the same course(s) in the subsequent quarter or course session to improve his/her academic performance.

i.)  Transfer Credits

Credits from transfer courses are calculated in the maximum allowable credits or ICR requirements. Grades for credits transferred from any postsecondary institution will be recorded as “TR” and will not affect the student’s CGPA. Grades from courses taken in a program within the same school group, if applicable to a transfer program, will be recorded as earned credit and will affect the student’s CGPA.

Students Transferring Between a Campus Program and an Online Program

A student who transfers from a campus program to an online program or who transfers from an online program to a campus program is subject to the following SAP policies and procedures:

  • A student who is in good standing per SAP in his/her term-based program transferring to either a campus term-based program or an online term-based program, will be evaluated according to the SAP policies and procedures for term based programs.
  • A student who is in good standing per SAP in his/her non-term based  program transferring to either a campus term-based program or an online term-based program, will be evaluated according to the SAP policies and procedures for term based programs

Note that the evaluation criteria and period of time until the next applicable evaluation point may differ from the SAP policies and procedures of the student’s original program. The student should work closely with his/her academic advisor or academic counselor to understand the SAP implications (including financial aid implications) of his/her transfer before taking any action.

Student Progression Policies by Program

College of Business Progression Standards

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) Progression Policy

Progress through the dissertation phase of the DBA program includes a sequence of four required, 4-credit courses and up to four, 4-credit extension courses.

Progression Policy Requirements:

  • A student can earn a grade of Pass (P), Limited Progress (LP), or Fail (F) in the dissertation courses. The Dissertation Committee determines one of these outcomes for each course, including extension courses, in the dissertation sequence that corresponds to the grading scale in this way:
    • Approved = P
    • Approved with minor revisions = P
    • Not approved with major revisions = LP
    • Not approved because more than 50% of the course outcomes have not been met = F
  • Students who receive a grade of “F” in a non-extension course will be required to repeat the non-extension course and will be allowed only one repeated attempt of that course.
  • An extension course in the dissertation sequence can be repeated one time.
  • While enrolled in the dissertation phase of the DBA program, students who earn three grades of “F” will be dismissed from the program.

Course #1–BUS8100, Doctoral Dissertation Research Development

Students enrolled in BUS8100, Doctoral Dissertation Research Development, must have completed these outcomes before progressing to the next course in the series:

  1. Select an acceptable dissertation topic.
  2. Construct a research problem statement.
  3. Begin an annotated bibliography.
  4. Construct a research purpose statement.
  5. Construct research questions that align with the problem and purpose statement.
  6. Develop an abridged literature review.
  7. Create a research topic paper.
  8. Prior to collecting data, seek approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) if the research to be conducted for the dissertation includes human subjects.

The Dissertation Committee will take one of the following actions:

  • Approved
  • Approved with minor  revisions
  • Not approved with major revisions
  • Not approved because more than 50% of the course outcomes have not been met

In order to progress to the next course in the sequence, the Dissertation Committee must approve and accept the student’s work submitted or approve the work submitted with minor revisions.

If the Dissertation Committee has determined that the student’s work requires major revisions, the student will receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) and will be required to enroll in BUS8100E, Doctoral Dissertation Research Development Extension.

Students who are not able to complete more than 50% of the required course outcomes while enrolled in the non-extension course will receive a grade of “F” in the course and will be required to repeat the non-extension course.

Students who are not able to complete more than 50% of the required course outcomes while enrolled in the extension course will receive a grade of “F” in the extension course.

Course #2-BUS8105, Doctoral Dissertation Proposal

Students enrolled in BUS8105, Doctoral Dissertation Proposal, must have completed these outcomes before progressing to the next course in the series:

  1. Complete a literature review and establish a theoretical perspective to support the research design process.
  2. Create a working bibliography of academic and professional titles.
  3. Select an appropriate research method to support the dissertation topic and design process.
  4. Identify appropriate data collection method(s).
  5. Finalize the dissertation topic proposal.
  6. Successfully defend Dissertation Proposal to the Dissertation Committee.

The Dissertation Proposal is reviewed and acted upon by the Dissertation Committee. The Dissertation Committee will take one of the following actions:

  • Approved
  • Approved with minor revisions
  • Not approved with major revisions
  • Not approved because more than 50% of the course outcomes have not been met

If the Dissertation Committee has determined that the student’s work requires major revisions, the student will receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) and will be required to enroll in BUS8105E, Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Extension.

Students who are not able to complete more than 50% of the required course outcomes while enrolled in the non-extension course will receive a grade of “F” in the course and will be required to repeat the non-extension course.

Students who are not able to complete more than 50% of the required course outcomes while enrolled in the extension course will receive a grade of “F” in the extension course.

Course #3-BUS8115, Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

Students enrolled in BUS8115, Doctoral Dissertation Preparation, must have completed these outcomes before progressing to the next course in the series:

  1. Collect data through the previously identified method(s).
  2. Analyze the data collected through the previously identified method(s).
  3. Draw conclusions based on the analysis of data.
  4. Draft a reporting and discussion of the research results.
  5. Draft a discussion of the conclusions and recommendations based on the data analysis.

The Dissertation draft document is reviewed and acted upon by the Dissertation Committee. The Dissertation Committee will take one of the following actions:

  • Approved
  • Approved with minor revisions
  • Not approved with major revisions
  • Not approved because more than 50% of the course outcomes have not been met

In order to progress to the next course in the series, the Dissertation Committee must approve the student’s work submitted or approve the work submitted with minor revisions.

If the student’s final Dissertation has not been approved by the Dissertation Committee, the student will receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) and will be required to enroll in BUS8115E, Doctoral Dissertation Preparation Extension.

Students who are not able to complete more than 50% of the required course outcomes while enrolled in the non-extension course will receive a grade of “F” in the course and will be required to repeat the non-extension course.

Students who are not able to complete more than 50% of the required course outcomes while enrolled in the extension course will receive a grade of “F” in the extension course.

Course #4–BUS8120, Doctoral Dissertation Defense

Student enrolled in BUS8120, Doctoral Dissertation Defense, must have completed these outcomes:

  1. Analyze the data collected through the previously identified method(s).
  2. Draw conclusions based on the analysis of data.
  3. Finalize a reporting and discussion of the research results.
  4. Finalize a discussion of the conclusions and recommendations based on the data analysis.
  5. Successfully defend final Dissertation to the Dissertation Committee.

The final Dissertation is reviewed and acted upon by the Dissertation Committee. The Dissertation Committee will take one of the following actions:

  • Approved
  • Approved with minor revisions
  • Not approved with major revisions
  • Not approved because more than 50% of the course outcomes have not been met

If the student’s final Dissertation has not been approved by the Dissertation Committee, the student will receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) and will be required to enroll in BUS8120E, Doctoral Dissertation Defense Extension.

Students who are not able to complete the final Dissertation while enrolled in the extension course will be dismissed from the program.

Appeals

Students enrolled in the DBA program seeking to challenge a grade will follow the university procedure. Refer to this section in the South University catalog: Grade Challenges for All Programs Except School of Pharmacy.

Students enrolled in the DBA program seeking to appeal a SAP dismissal decision will follow the university procedure. Refer to this section in the South University catalog: Procedures for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.

College of Health Professions Progression Standards

Associate of Science in Medical Assisting Formative Progression Standards

To be eligible for graduation, all course and clinical education requirements must be completed satisfactorily. Course and clinical requirements are published in the course syllabi. These are provided to each student, for each course, before or during the first class contact. Medical assisting program faculty will comply with all published requirements for satisfactory student progress, course syllabi and course goals and objectives described in the program.

  1. Students in medical assisting coursework (AHS classes), must achieve a minimum grade of C in all courses. Students will be permitted to repeat a course in which they scored lower than a C, during the next quarter the course is offered. When a student repeats a course they must achieve a minimum grade of B. This repeat option will be offered only once.
  2. To assist students’ achievement of entry-level knowledge, the following remediation procedure will be followed in all AHS classes. Students scoring less than 80 percent on any written examination will be expected to remediate that examination. The remediation plan will be cited in the course syllabi and the following will be required:
    1. A written counseling procedure will be developed by the course instructor.
    2. All incorrect answers will be corrected by the student, with citation of the correct answer (textbook and page number) in the format determined by the course instructor. Failure to comply with the written counseling procedures will result in a grade of Incomplete for the course. Refer to the University catalog for resolution of an incomplete grade.
  3. Medical assisting coursework must be completed meeting minimal competency standards as listed in the section on Entry-Level Competencies for the Medical Assistant as listed in the program student handbook. Failure to receive a passing grade for a required competency will require that the student repeat the course. Repeated AHS courses will require a learning contract with the student. This contract will describe the conditions under which the student may continue in the Medical Assisting program.
  4. Students who are dismissed from an extern site will be suspended from the program while a faculty committee, chaired by the program director, investigates the reason for the dismissal. If the committee deems the dismissal a substantial indicator that the student will not succeed in the profession, the student will be dropped from the program. If the committee feels that despite dismissal from a particular clinical rotation the student has a high probability of entering the profession as a safe, proficient practitioner, the student will be provided the opportunity to continue with the practicum program. If the student is dismissed a second time while at an extern site the student will be dropped from the program.

Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant Program Progression Standards

Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) students are required to satisfactorily complete all technical phase course and clinical education requirements in order to remain in good standing and to be eligible for graduation. Students and program faculty must comply with published programmatic policies, syllabi, course goals and objectives, as well as published University requirements to ensure satisfactory student progress through the technical phase. 

The PTA Progressions Committee (PC) is responsible for monitoring the technical phase progressions and reinstatement policies, which include academic, clinical, and conduct domains related to the PTA program. The PC reviews the progress of each student no less than once per quarter and more frequently as indicated. The PC will recommend an appropriate action for each student based on his/her academic, clinical, and professional performance. These actions may include progression to the next quarter, graduation, probation, continued probation, removal from probation, suspension, or dismissal. The PC may recommend other actions including, but not limited to, remediation or repetition of coursework and participation in academic tutoring.

The policies described below either clarify, operationalize, or augment the South University Satisfactory Academic Progress Policies.

Good Standing Status - Students must meet all of the following criteria while in the technical phase of the program:

  1. Maintain the minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.50 for all technical PTA designated courses during each quarter of the technical phase.
  2. Successfully complete academic coursework by achieving a minimum grade of “C” (70%) in all PTA designated courses. If a course has a lab element, the evaluation requirements are divided into lecture and laboratory components. In order for a final grade to be calculated, student must achieve a minimum average of 70% in EACH individual component. Averages below 70% in either the lecture or laboratory component will result in a “D” or “F” grade. If BOTH components meet the minimum 70%, they will be averaged together and then professional behavior points will be added to assign the final course grade.
    1. Students who do not achieve a minimum grade of “C” in any PTA course are unable to continue in the curriculum and will be immediately dismissed.  Please refer to the Dismissal Process below.
    2. Students repeating an academic course must achieve a minimum grade of “B” (80%). If the course has a lab element, students must achieve a minimum average of 80% in EACH individual component (i.e., lecture and lab). Students who fail to achieve a minimum grade of “B” will be dismissed from the program and are not eligible for reinstatement. Please refer to the Dismissal Process below.
    3. Remediation While in Good Standing:
      1. Remediation is mandatory if a student scores less than 75% on a written exam or if the student fails to demonstrate all designated critical safety elements in a practical examination. Failure to remediate via the format prescribed by the instructor (or PC) will result in an incomplete grade.  Refer to the University catalog for the requirements for resolution of an incomplete grade.
      2. A written remediation plan (e.g., Student Counseling Report, Student Learning Contract, etc.) is initiated when a student’s average is nearing or below a failing grade for the course. Failure to comply with a remediation plan is likely to result in a failing grade.
  3. Successfully complete clinical coursework with a grade of pass (P). To receive a passing grade (P), students must meet minimal competency standards and successfully complete all course requirements as published in clinical course syllabi.
    1. If the student fails to receive a passing grade in any clinical course or if they are removed or withdraw from a clinical affiliation, they will proceed to Level Two: Suspension.
  4. Student Code of Conduct/Professional Behavior
    1. Students will abide by the University Code of Conduct (see Campus Student Handbook) and PTA Professional Conduct Code below.
PTA Professional Conduct Code

The PTA faculty consider professional behavior as one of the most important components in the education of PTA students.  Students enrolled in the PTA program are expected to abide by all of the following:

1.) the South University Code of Conduct, 2.) the American Physical Therapy Association’s (APTA) Guide for Conduct of the PTA, 3.) the APTA’s Standards of Ethical Conduct for the PTA, and 4.) additional programmatic and instructor policies (e.g., attendance policies, lab rules, etc.) as published in the PTA Program Student Handbook and course syllabi.

Code of Conduct violations will be referred to the Dean of Student Affairs and addressed according to the disciplinary procedures published in the Campus Student Handbook.  All other violations will be referred to the Program Director and may result in a written remediation plan, referral to the Progressions Committee (PC), and/or referral to the Dean of Student Affairs.

PTA Dismissal and Withdrawal Process
  1. Level One: “Warning”

Failure to maintain the minimum CGPA of 2.5 will result in the student being placed on warning. The student will be permitted to remain on warning for a maximum of one quarter (but no later than the first full-time externship).  If this requirement is not met, the student will be removed from the program (see Level Three: Immediate Dismissal).

  1. Level Two:  “Suspension”

Withdrawal or removal from a clinical course or receipt of a failing grade in a clinical course will result in suspension while the PC investigates the situation.  The PC will choose one of the following actions within 14 calendar days of the occurrence:

  1. If the committee determines that the student has a high probability of entering the profession as a safe, proficient practitioner, the student may be permitted to repeat the clinical course. The PC will outline requirements for completion of the course in conjunction with the Program Director and Academic Coordinator for Clinical Education (ACCE). The option to repeat a clinical course will be offered only once for any student while in the technical phase of the program.
  2. If the committee deems the withdrawal/removal or failing grade a substantial indicator that the student will not succeed in the profession, the student will proceed to Level Three: Immediate Dismissal.
  1. Level Three: “Immediate Dismissal”

Students are immediately dismissed when any of the following occur:

  1. Failure to achieve a CGPA of 2.5 within one quarter of being placed on warning status.
  2. Failure to achieve a CGPA of 2.5 prior to the first full-time externship.
  3. Receipt of one or more “D” or “F” grades in academic coursework.
  4. The PC recommends dismissal in the case of an incomplete clinical course or failed clinical course.
  5. The PC recommends dismissal in the case of a significant policy, Code of Conduct, or PTA Professional Conduct Code violation.

The Program Director will notify students in writing if they are dismissed from the program. PTA students wishing to appeal their dismissal must do so in writing to the individual specified in the letter within 14 days of receipt of the dismissal letter: the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations if the dismissal was academic, or the Dean of Student Affairs if the dismissal was related to student conduct. Academic appeals will be handled in accordance with the Procedures for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal as published in the Academic Catalog. Student Code of Conduct and PTA Professional Conduct Code appeals will be handled in accordance with the University Code of Conduct policy published in the Campus Student Handbook.

Students who have been dismissed from the program may be considered for reinstatement by following the PTA Reinstatement Procedure. Note: If the student is dismissed a second time while in the technical phase, the student will be permanently removed from the program and will not be eligible for readmission into any South University PTA program.  Students should be aware that withdrawing from any course within the PTA curriculum schedule automatically withdraws the student from the PTA program.

PTA REINSTATEMENT POLICY

Students who wish to be considered for reinstatement should reapply using the following procedure. The reinstatement process will only be offered once. There is no guarantee of reinstatement for any student.

To begin the reinstatement process, the student must apply in writing to the Progressions Committee (via the Program Director) requesting reinstatement in the program. The letter must include the date the student wishes to return and a rationale describing how the student plans to complete the program successfully. The letter must be received by the Program Director no later than 60 days prior to the first day of the academic quarter into which the student wishes to reenroll.  The Progressions Committee (PC) will meet within 3 weeks of receipt of the letter to consider the reinstatement request and complete a plan of action to address the reasons for withdraw/dismissal.  The student may be required to attend this meeting.

The PC will formally notify the student of their decision and plan of action within 5 business days of the meeting. If remediation or other action is warranted, it must be successfully completed no less than 7 calendar days prior to the start of the quarter in which the student wishes to reenroll. If this does not occur, the student must reinitiate the reinstatement process. The final decision for acceptance into the next cohort will be based upon available slots in the cohort, successful completion of any actions required by the PC, and a reasonable expectation that the student in question has potential to succeed in the program.

Reinstatement Procedure
  1. If the student withdrew or was dismissed during the first quarter of the program, the PC may elect to have the student enter the ranking process to gain admission to the next cohort.  The student will be required to follow the same application process as all other applicants.  If the student gains admission to the technical phase, he/she will repeat all previously attempted PTA coursework.
  2. If the student withdrew or was dismissed after completing one or more quarters of the program, the PC will determine what coursework, if any, must be repeated upon reinstatement. The student must repeat any course in which he/she did not achieve a minimum grade of “C” (70%), however the PC may also require a student to repeat coursework that was completed successfully if it is deemed to be critical to the success of the student (see financial aid for costs associated with retaking coursework). The PC may also require actions including, but not limited to, remediation, competency checks, and/or written or didactic exams to determine if the student is suitable to return to the program and to help ensure student success. When a student repeats a course he/she must achieve a minimum grade of B (80%) to continue in the curriculum.  If the student fails to achieve a minimum grade of B in repeated coursework, he/she will be dismissed from the program and is not eligible for reinstatement.
  3. Students who are eligible for reinstatement and who have been out of the program for longer than one year must reapply for admission to the university and meet the current admissions requirements of the technical phase of the PTA program.
  4. The reinstated student will be required to comply with the curriculum and requirements in force at the time of reinstatement, including any changes made to the curriculum or prerequisites during his/her absence from the program.
  5. If a student is dismissed a second time while in the technical phase, the dismissal is permanent and the student is not eligible for reinstatement into any South University PTA program.

The decision for reinstatement of any student is made at the discretion of the PC.  Students wishing to appeal this decision must do so in writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations.  If the student is not satisfied with the results of the appeal, he/she may file an appeal with the Dean of the College of Health Professions.  The decision of the Dean of the College of Health Professions is final.

Doctor of Occupational Therapy Student Progressions Committee

The Student Progressions Committee is chaired by the Program Director who serves as a non-voting member of the committee. A quorum (defined as a simple majority of voting core faculty members) must be present to commence the Student Progressions Committee meeting.

Doctor of Occupational Therapy Student Progressions Committee Procedure

The Student Progressions Committee meets at least quarterly, or more often as needed, to review each Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), professionalism evaluations, and other information that may be available to aid in evaluation of each student.  For procedures on students not meeting SAP standards, see above.

At the quarterly meeting, the Student Progressions Committee makes one of the following recommendations to the Program Director for each student’s clinical and professional progress in the program:   

  • Advance in good standing
  • Advance on professional/clinical probation
  • Suspension
  • Expulsion

If a student is being considered for placement in a status other than advance in good standing, he/she will be asked to speak formally to the Student Progressions Committee before a final decision is rendered by the committee.

Any student not recommended to advance in good standing will be notified within 72 hours (3-business days) by the Program Director.  The Program Director will notify the Dean of the College of Health Professions and the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations on all recommendations of the Student Progressions Committee other than advance in good standing and provide details and justification for the recommendation.

In cases where professional/clinical probation is recommended by the Student Progressions Committee, the Program Director may require the student to meet with the academic advisor to define an exact remediation strategy or corrective action plan (CAP). Any remediation strategy may be approved by the Program Director. The Student Progressions Committee will continue to assess the student’s progress under the plan provided to the Student Progressions Committee.

In addition to quarterly meetings, the Student Progressions Committee may be convened on an ad hoc basis at any time to address specific student issues.

Appeals of the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Student Progressions Committee Decisions

In cases where students do not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress, appeals will be handled according to the SAP policy.

Students may appeal decisions of the Student Progressions Committee on issues regarding clinical performance or professionalism. Any student wishing to appeal a decision of the Student Progressions Committee other than those based on the SAP policy must do so in writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations. Written appeals must be made within seven (7) business days of being notified of the decision of the Student Progressions Committee.  Appeals submitted after this time will not be considered. Written appeals will only be considered for claims of the following:

  • Failure of the program or University to follow due process
  • New evidence pertinent to the student’s case that has come to light after the committee’s final decision was handed down.
  • Punishment not appropriate for the situation

The Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations will review the student’s appeal and will determine whether the circumstances and academic status warrant reconsideration of the decision of the Student Progressions Committee.

The student may be asked to appear in person during the review process when deemed necessary by the Dean. The Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations will send formal notification to the student and appropriate academic offices of his/her decision.

The final level of appeal is to the Dean of the College of Health Professions. The Dean will use the reports from the Student Progressions Committee and the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations and will consult with the Program Director and Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations to reach a conclusion regarding the student’s disposition. The Dean of the College of Health Professions will send formal notification to the student and appropriate academic offices.

A student who has been expelled whose appeal is granted may be reinstated and, if otherwise eligible, receive financial aid; however, the student will be placed on professional probation at the start of the academic term. The granting of appeals for decisions other than suspension or expulsion may stipulate certain conditions  as deemed necessary by the party granting the appeal for a student to continue in the  program.

College of Nursing and Public Health Progression Standards

RN to MSN, Master of Science in Nursing, Post-Graduate Certificate and Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs Progression Standards**

All course and practicum education requirements must be completed satisfactorily in order for the student to be eligible for graduation. All course and practical requirements are published in the course syllabi and expanded upon in the Student Handbook. Course syllabi are provided to each student before or during the first class contact for each course. Student Handbooks are given to students after acceptance into the nursing program. Nursing program faculty must comply with published syllabi and course goals and objectives as well as published requirements for satisfactory student progress through the program. NOTE: The minimum CGPA of 3.0 is required to enroll in NSG5000  (Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse: Transformational Leadership in Advanced Practice) or higher level courses.

  1. Students in good standing are required to meet the academic progression standards as stated in the Satisfactory Academic Progression Policy. Failure to meet the SAP standards may result in dismissal from the nursing program.
  2. Students admitted to the RN to MSN program must earn a B or better in all courses through the entire program of study (inclusive of undergraduate and graduate nursing courses). Students will be permitted to repeat coursework in a single occurrence in which they scored lower than the required letter grade the next quarter or session that the coursework is offered. When a student repeats a course the student must achieve a minimum grade of B or higher. The repeat option will be offered only once. Students who receive more than one incidence of less than a “B” in any nursing course will be removed from the nursing program.
  3. Students who are removed from a clinical affiliation prior to completing the rotation will be suspended from the program while the Program Director/Chair investigates the reasons for the removal. If the Program Director/Chair deems the removal is warranted, the student will be removed from the nursing programs.
  4. If the Program Director/Chair determines that despite removal from a particular clinical rotation the student has a high probability of entering the profession as a safe, proficient practitioner, the student may be permitted to repeat the clinical course when space permits. If the student is removed a second time while in advanced standing, the student will be removed from the program.
  5. Campus-based students may appeal decisions to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations and then the College Dean.  Online students may appeal to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Online and then the College Dean.  The decision of the College Dean is final.
RN to MSN, Master of Science in Nursing, Post-Graduate Certificate and Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs Reinstatement Policy

This procedure applies to readmission for students who withdraw from any course in the Nursing program, who withdraw from the Nursing program, or who receive less than the required letter grade in any course in any given quarter in the Nursing program. Students who receive more than one incidence of less than a “B” letter grade will be removed from the program. The final decision for acceptance into the next cohort is provided by the Program Director/Chair based on available slots in the cohort and a reasonable expectation that the student in question has potential to succeed in the program. The reapplication process will only be offered once. There is no guarantee of reinstatement for a student who withdraws from the Nursing program.

Timing for Reinstatement (Term-Based Programs)

No later than the 3rd (third) week of the academic term preceding the term into which the student wishes to reenroll, the student must apply in writing to the Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs requesting reinstatement in the program.

No later than the 4th (fourth) week of the academic term preceding the term into which the student wishes to re-enroll, the student must meet with the Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs to complete a plan of action to address the reasons for the failure or withdrawal.

By the end of the academic term proceeding the term into which the student wishes to reenroll, the Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs will determine the appropriateness of reinstatement into the program. The decision will be based on the availability of space in the cohort and on the Program Director/Dean of Academic Affairs’ judgment of the student’s potential to achieve success in the curriculum. Students may appeal decisions to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations and then the College Dean.

The reinstated student will be required to comply with the curriculum and requirements in force at the time of reinstatement, including any changes made to the curriculum or prerequisites during their absence from the program. Students who are eligible for readmission and who have been out of the program for any reason longer than one year must reapply for admission to the university and the RN to MSN, Master of Science in Nursing, Post-Graduate Certificate and Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs.

Any student reinstated in the program for academic reasons (failure to obtain the minimum final letter grade or withdrawal from the program with less than the required minimum academic achievement at the time of withdrawal) will be required to obtain a minimum final grade of B, determined as described in the university catalog, in any repeated courses in order to continue in the curriculum.

Reapplication Timeline for the RN to MSN, MSN and DNP Programs
REAPPLICATION TIMELINE 10 and 11 WEEK DEADLINE 5 WEEK DEADLINE
Student must apply in writing to Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs By 3rd week of preceding term By 1st week of preceding term
Student must communicate with Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs By 5th week of preceding term By 2nd week of preceding term
Program Director or Dean of Academic Affairs will notify the student of the decision. By 8th week of preceding term By 4th week of preceding term
Timing for Reinstatement for the RN to MSN, MSN, PGC and DNP Programs (Non-Term Based Programs)

Students wishing to re-enroll must apply in writing to the Program Director/Chair six (6) weeks prior to their desired reentry date.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program Progression Standards

All course and practicum education requirements must be completed satisfactorily in order for the student to be eligible for graduation. All course and practice requirements are published in the course syllabi and expanded upon in the Nursing Student Handbook. Course syllabi are provided to each student before or during the first class contact for each course. Student Handbooks are available electronically to students after acceptance into the nursing program. Nursing program faculty must comply with published syllabi and course goals and objectives as well as published requirements for satisfactory student progress through the program.

NOTE: The minimum CGPA required to be eligible to apply to the BSN program is 2.50.

  1. Students in good standing are required to meet the academic progression standards as stated in the Satisfactory Academic Progression Policy. Failure to meet the SAP standards may result in dismissal from the nursing program.
  2. Students, accepted into BSN program, may have one quarter with a grade of less than C in undergraduate nursing courses. Students will not be allowed to progress in the program and will be required to sit out until the course is offered again. Students will be permitted to repeat course(s) in which they scored lower than the required letter grade of C the next quarter that the course is offered. When a course is repeated the student must achieve a minimum grade of C or higher. Failure to obtain a grade of C or higher in the repeated course will result the student being permanently dismissed from the program. The repeat option will be offered only once. Please refer to the Undergraduate Nursing Programs Withdrawal Policy found in the Undergraduate Nursing Student Handbook.
  3. A successful clinical practitioner is required to apply knowledge learned in the classroom to the care and treatment of patients. Laboratory or clinical experience courses will have grades reported as pass (P) or fail (F). Grades for practicum/laboratory courses are calculated using written and other appropriate methods of assessing clinical competence. Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of “P” (pass) in the laboratory/clinical course as well as the classroom courses. For purposes of progression, failure of practicum/laboratory courses carries the same consequences as those courses with letter grades.
  4. Remediation is mandatory if a student scores less than the stated percentage on any ATI assessment as outlined in the course syllabi. Please refer to the nursing student handbook for details or course syllabi for detailed explanation.
  5. Students who are removed from a clinical affiliation prior to completing the rotation will be suspended from the program while the Program Director/Chair investigates the reasons for the removal. If the Program Director/Chair deems the removal is warranted, the student will be dismissed from the nursing programs.

If the Program Director/Chair determines that despite removal from a particular clinical rotation the student has a high probability of entering the profession as a safe, proficient practitioner, the student may be permitted to repeat the clinical course when space permits. If the student is removed a second time, the student will be expelled from the program.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program Reinstatement Policy

This procedure applies to reinstatement for students who withdraw from any course in the Nursing program, who withdraw from the Nursing program, or who receive less than the required letter grade in any course in any given quarter in the Nursing program. The final decision for acceptance into the next cohort is provided by the Program Director/Chair based on available space in the cohort and a reasonable expectation that the student in question has potential to succeed in the program. The reapplication process will only be offered once. There is no guarantee of reinstatement for a student who withdraws from the Nursing program.

  1. No later than the 3rd (third) week of the academic term preceding the term into which the student wishes to return, the student must apply in writing to the Program Director/Chair requesting reinstatement in the program.
  2. No later than the 4th (fourth) week of the academic term preceding the term into which the student wishes to reenroll, the student must communicate with the Program Director/Chair to complete a plan of action to address the reasons for the failure or withdrawal.
  3. By the end of the academic term proceeding the term into which the student wishes to reenroll, the Program Director and/or Chair will determine the appropriateness of reinstatement into the program. The decision will be based on the availability of space in the cohort and on the Program Director/Chair judgment of the student’s potential to achieve success in the curriculum. Students may appeal decisions to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations and then the College Dean.
  4. The reinstated student will be required to comply with the curriculum and requirements in force at the time of reinstatement, including any changes made to the curriculum or prerequisites during their absence from the program.
  5. Students who are eligible for readmission and who have been out of the program for any reason longer than one year must reapply for admission to the university and the Nursing program.
Reapplication Timeline for the BSN Program
REAPPLICATION TIMELINE 11 WEEK DEADLINE
Student must apply in writing to Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs By 3rd week of preceding term
Student must communicate with Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs By 5th week of preceding term
Program Director or Dean of Academic Affairs will notify the student of the decision. By 8th week of preceding term

Nursing (RN to BSN) Nursing Program Progression Standards

All course and practicum education requirements must be completed satisfactorily in order for the student to be eligible for graduation. All course and practice requirements are published in the course syllabi and expanded upon in the Student Handbook. Course syllabi are provided to each student before or during the first class contact for each course. Student Handbooks are given to students after acceptance into the nursing program. Nursing program faculty must comply with published syllabi and course goals and objectives as well as published requirements for satisfactory student progress through the program.

NOTE: The minimum CGPA requirement for full admission into the RN to BSN program is 2.50. Provisional acceptance may be permitted for those students with a CGPA of 2.0-2.49.

  1. Students in good standing are required to meet the academic progression standards as stated in the Satisfactory Academic Progression Policy. Failure to meet the SAP standards may result in dismissal from the nursing program.
  2. Students may have one quarter for term-based students, or one session for students in non-term based programs with a grade of less than C in undergraduate nursing courses. Students will be permitted to repeat course(s) in which they scored lower than the required letter grade of C the next quarter or session that the coursework is offered. When a student repeats a course the student must achieve a minimum grade of C or higher. Failure to obtain a grade of C or higher in the repeated course will result the student being permanently dismissed from the program. The repeat option will be offered only once. Please refer to the Undergraduate Nursing Programs Withdrawal Policy found in the Undergraduate Nursing Student Handbook.
  3. Satisfactory completion of general education requirement and 3000 level nursing courses is required before progression to 4000 level nursing courses.
  4. Students who are removed from a clinical affiliation prior to completing the rotation will be suspended from the program while the Program Director/Chair investigates the reasons for the removal. If the Program Director/Chair deems the removal is warranted, the student will be removed from the nursing programs.
  5. If the Program Director/Chair determines that despite removal from a particular clinical rotation the student has a high probability of entering the profession as a safe, proficient practitioner, the student may be permitted to repeat the clinical course when space permits. If removed a second time, the student will be dismissed from the nursing programs.
  6. Students who have been removed from the program may reapply after one year from the time that they were dismissed from the program. Readmission will be based on all applicable admissions criteria at the time of application for readmission.
Nursing Program (RN to BSN) Reinstatement Policy

This procedure applies to readmission for students who are dismissed from the nursing program, or who receive less than the required letter grade in any course in any given quarter in the Nursing program The final decision for acceptance into the next available term is provided by the Program Director/Chair based on space availability and a reasonable expectation that the student in question has potential to succeed in the program. The reapplication process will only be offered once. There is no guarantee of reinstatement for a student who withdraws from the Nursing program. Students who voluntarily withdraw from the Nursing Completion Program are not guaranteed readmission due to lack of space.

Timing for Reinstatement (Term-Based Programs)
  1. No later than the 3rd (third) week of the academic quarter preceding the quarter into which the student wishes to reenroll, the student must apply in writing to the Program Director/Chair requesting reinstatement in the program.
  2. No later than the 5th (fifth) week of the academic quarter preceding the quarter into which the student wishes to reenroll, the student must communicate with the Program Director/Chair to complete a plan of action to address the reasons for the failure or withdrawal.
  3. By the end of the academic term proceeding the term into which the student wishes to reenroll, the Program Director/Chair will determine the appropriateness of reinstatement into the program. The decision will be based on the availability of space in the cohort and on the Program Director/Chair judgment of the student’s potential to achieve success in the curriculum. Students may appeal decisions to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations and then the College Dean.
    1. The reinstated student will be required to comply with the curriculum and requirements in force at the time of reinstatement, including any changes made to the curriculum or prerequisites during their absence from the program. Students who are eligible for readmission and who have been out of the program for any reason longer than one year must reapply for admission to the university and the Nursing program.
Reapplication Timeline
REAPPLICATION TIMELINE 11 WEEK DEADLINE
Student must apply in writing to Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations By 3rd week of preceding term
Student must communicate with Program Director and/or Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations By 5th week of preceding term
Program Director or Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations will notify the student of the decision. By 8th week of preceding term
Timing for Reinstatement (Non-Term Based Programs)

Students wishing to reenroll must apply in writing to the Program Director/Chair six (6) weeks prior to their desired re-entry date.

College of Theology Progression Standards

Doctor of Ministry Program Progression Standards

All course and practicum education requirements must be completed satisfactorily in order for the student to be eligible for graduation. All course and practical requirements are published in the course syllabi and expanded upon in the Student Handbook. Course syllabi are provided to each student before or during the first class contact for each course. Student Handbooks are given to students after acceptance into the program. D.Min. program faculty must comply with published syllabi and course goals and objectives as well as published requirements for satisfactory student progress through the program. NOTE: The minimum CGPA required to be eligible to apply to the Standard Track of the D.Min. program is 2.7; the minimum CGPA for the Advanced Track is 3.0.

  1. Students in good standing are required to meet the academic progression standards as stated in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy (SAP). Failure to meet the SAP standards may result in dismissal from the D.Min. program.
  2. All students must take MIN7000 Learning Skills for Ministry and MIN7001 Academic Writing in the first quarter/term.  Students who take only one course should take MIN7001 Academic Writing first.  If the courses are not passed with a grade of C or better (or P for MIN7001), the course must be retaken and no other courses may be taken until the course is successfully completed after the second attempt.  Students who fail to successfully complete these will be dismissed from the program.
  3. Students may elect to test out of MIN7001 Academic Writing by taking the WritePlacer Writing Test before registering for courses.  The test is administered once at admission.  Students who achieve a passing score of 6 or higher on the WritePlacer test do not have to take MIN7001 Academic Writing and may replace the course with an elective.
  4. All students must take the Computer Skills Proficiency test before registering for courses in their first quarter/term.  Students who do not achieve a score of 85% for the CSP test are required to attend a computer skills workshop before or during their first quarter/term and may retake the CSP test up to three times.  Students who do not attend the workshop and/or do not achieve a score of 85% by the third attempt will be dismissed from the program at the end of the first quarter.
  5. Students must complete all coursework in the program with a grade of C or better. Students will be permitted to repeat coursework in a single occurrence in which they scored lower than the required letter grade the next quarter or session that the course is offered.  No course may be retaken more than once (except MIN7000 Learning Skills for Ministry). Students who fail to successfully complete courses will be dismissed from the program.
  6. Standard Track students must successfully complete a portfolio review at the mid-point of the program (48 credits completed) and at the end of the program (96 credits).  Advanced Track students must complete a portfolio review at the end of the program (40 credits). Students who do not successfully complete the portfolio review will be placed on programmatic probation for one quarter to complete assigned tasks.  Students who have not completed this task at the end of the probationary quarter will be dismissed from the program.
  7. Standard Track students should plan to enroll in practicum courses after the fifth quarter/term.  Students should plan to begin ministry internships or ministry mentor opportunities after the start of the first course in the chosen practicum sequence (MIN7590 Ministry Practicum I or MIN7591 Clinical Pastoral Education, Level 1A or MIN7592 Clinical Pastoral Education, Level 2A) and to finish them before the end of the second course in the chosen practicum sequence (MIN7690 Ministry Practicum II or MIN7691 Clinical Pastoral Education, Level 1B or MIN7692 Clinical Pastoral Education, Level 2B.
  8. Students must successfully complete MIN7500 Theology and Research in Ministry before enrolling in any final project course.
  9. Students must meet ethical and professional standards as identified by the College of Theology, the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (AAPC), the Association of Professional Chaplains (APC), and South University. 
Programmatic Probation 

A student will be placed on probation in the following situations:

  1. Inadequate practicum performance.
  2. Violation of the Graduate Honor Code.
  3. Breach of ethical, moral, or professional conduct.

Students who do not meet remediation expectations after two quarters of programmatic probation will be dismissed from the program. Note: A student cannot be placed on programmatic probation more than once.

Reinstatement Policy 

Students who are placed on programmatic probation will be given a remediation plan developed by their Program Director and approved by the Department Chair and/or College Dean.  The plan may include academic and non-academic requirements appropriate to the reason for probation.  A written evaluation will be submitted to the Department Chair and/or College Dean at the completion of the plan, who will then notify the Registrar to reinstate the student or continue the student on probation.  Students who are alleged to have violated the Graduate Honor Code or the standards of ethical professional conduct adopted by the College of Theology will be referred to the Graduate Honor Council.

 Appeal of Programmatic Probation or Dismissal

Students may appeal the decision to be placed on programmatic probation to the College Dean or his/her designee.  The student should provide any necessary documentation along with a letter of appeal.  The College Dean will review the case and interview participants. The student may appeal the decision of the College Dean to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his/her designee.  The decision of the Vice Chancellor (or designee) is final. The appeal process for programmatic probation or dismissal for violations of the Graduate Honor Code or violations of ethical and professional standards is found in the Graduate Honor Council section of the D.Min. Student Handbook.

 The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (“FERPA”) sets out requirements designed to afford students certain rights with respect to their education records. In addition, it puts limits on what information South University may disclose to third parties without receiving prior written consent from the student.

I. Procedure to Inspect Education Records

Students have the right under FERPA to inspect and review their education records. A student who wishes to inspect and review his/her records should submit a written request to the registrar. The request should identify as precisely as possible the records the student wishes to inspect. If the requested records are subject to inspection and review by the student, arrangements for access will be made within a reasonable period of time but in no case more than 45 days after the request was made, and the student will be notified of the time and place where the records may be inspected. The school may require the presence of a school official during the inspection and review of a student’s records.

Certain limitations exist on a student’s right to inspect and review their own education records. Those limitations include, for example, the following: (i) financial information submitted by parents; (ii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files prior to January 1, 1975; (iii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files after January 1, 1975 to which the student has waived his or her right to inspect and review and that are related to the student’s admission, application for employment or job placement, or receipt of honors. In addition, the term “education record” does not include certain types of records such as, by way of example, records of instructional, supervisory, administrative, and certain educational personnel that are in the sole possession of the maker thereof, and are not accessible or revealed to any other individual except a substitute.

When a record contains personally identifiable information about more than one student, the student may inspect and review only the information that relates to him/her personally.

II. Disclosure of Educational Records

South University generally will not permit disclosure of personally identifiable information from the records of a student without prior written consent of the student. Personally identifiable information is disclosed (some items are mandatory, some discretionary) from the records of a student without that student’s prior written consent to the following individuals or institutions or in the following circumstances:

  1. To South University officials who have been determined by the school to have legitimate educational interests in the records. A school official is:
  1. a person employed by the school or its corporate parent in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position. This includes, but is not limited to human resources and accounting staff for purposes of the tuition reimbursement plan; or
  2. a person employed by or under contract to the school to perform specific tasks, such as an auditor, consultant, or attorney, a person on the Board of Trustees, or a student serving on an official committee or assisting another school official.      
  3. Any school official who needs information about a student in the course of performing instructional, supervisory, advisory, or administrative duties for South University has a legitimate educational interest.
  1. To certain officials of the United States Department of Education, the Comptroller General of the United States, the Attorney General of the United States, and state and local educational authorities in connection with state or federally supported educational programs.
  2. In connection with the student’s request for, or receipt of, financial aid necessary to determine the eligibility, amounts or conditions of financial aid, or to enforce the terms and conditions of the aid.
  3. To organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school.
  4. To accrediting commissions or state licensing or regulatory bodies to carry out their functions.
  5. To parents of a dependent student, as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code.
  6. To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena.
  7. To appropriate parties in health or safety emergencies.
  8. To officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
  9. To an alleged victim of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sexual offense, the final results of the disciplinary proceedings conducted by the school against the alleged perpetrator of that crime or offense with respect to that crime or offense.
  10. To persons in addition to the victim of a crime of violence or non-forcible sexual offense, the final results of the disciplinary proceedings described in paragraph 10 above but only if the school has determined that a student is the perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sexual offense, and with respect to the allegation made against him or her, the student has committed a violation of the institution’s rules or policies. (The school, in such instances, may only disclose the name of the perpetrator not the name of any other student, including a victim or witness without the prior written consent of the other student(s)).
    1. Both the accuser and the accused must be informed of the outcome of any institutional disciplinary proceeding brought alleging a sex offense. Compliance with this paragraph does not constitute a violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. 1232g). For the purpose of this paragraph, the outcome of a disciplinary proceeding means only the institution’s final determination with respect to the alleged sex offense and any sanction that is imposed against the accused.
  11. To a parent regarding the student’s violation of any federal, state, or local law or of any rules or policy of the school governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to that use or possession, and the student is under 21 at the time of the disclosure to the parent.
  12. Directory information (see Section IV below).
  13. Student Recruiting Information as requested by the U.S. Military. Student recruiting information includes ONLY: name, address, telephone listing, age or date of birth, class level, academic major, place of birth, degrees received and most recent educational institution attended. It does not include and South University will not provide: social security numbers, race, ethnicity, nationality, GPA, grades, low performing student lists, religious affiliation, students with loans in default, veteran’s status, students no longer enrolled. Students who opt out of the directory also opt out of student recruiting information.
III. Record of Requests for Disclosure

Except with respect to those requests made by the student themselves, those disclosures made with the written consent of the student, or to requests by or disclosures to South University officials with legitimate educational interests and disclosures of directory information (or other exceptions described in the applicable regulations), South University will maintain a record indicating the parties who have requested or obtained personally identifiable information from a student’s education records and the legitimate interests those parties had in requesting or obtaining the information. This record may be inspected by the student.

IV. Directory Information

South University designates the following information as directory information. (Directory information is personally identifiable information which may be disclosed without the student’s consent):

  1. Student’s name
  2. Address: Local, email and website
  3. Telephone number (local)
  4. Date and place of birth
  5. Program of study
  6. Participation in officially recognized activities
  7. Dates of attendance
  8. Degrees and certificates awarded
  9. Most recent previously attended school
  10. Photograph of the student, if available
  11. Enrollment status (i.e., enrolled, continuing, future enrolled student, reentry, leave of absence, etc.)
  12. Student honors and awards received.
  13. The height and weight of athletic team members.

Notice of these categories and of the right of an individual in attendance at to request that his/her directory information be kept confidential will be given to the student annually. Students may request nondisclosure of student directory information by specifying nondisclosure, in writing, to the Office of the Registrar, as listed in the Appendix of this catalog.  . Failure to request nondisclosure of directory information will result in routine disclosure of one or more of the above-designated categories of personally identifiable directory information.

V. Correction of Educational Records

Students have the right under FERPA to ask to have records corrected which they believe are inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of their privacy rights. The following are the procedures for the correction of records:

  1. A student must ask the Registrar to amend a record. As part of the request, the student should identify the part of the record they want to have changed and specify why they believe it to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his/her privacy rights.
  2. South University may either amend the record or decide not to amend the record. If it decides not to amend the record, it will notify the student of its decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s privacy rights.
  3. Upon request, South University will arrange for a hearing and notify the student reasonably in advance of the date, place, and time of the hearing. The hearing will be conducted by an individual who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. That individual may be an official of South University. The student shall be afforded a forum for the opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student’s education records. The student may be assisted by other people, including an attorney.
  4. South University will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence, and the reasons for the decision.
  5. If, as a result of the hearing, South University decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it will (a) amend the record accordingly; and (b) inform the student of the amendment in writing.
  6. If, as a result of the hearing, South University decides that the information in the education record is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it shall inform the student of the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information in the record or stating why he or she disagrees with the decision of the school.
  7. If a statement is placed in the education records of a student under paragraph 6 above, South University will:
    1. maintain the statement with the contested part of the record for as long as the record is maintained; and
    2. disclose the statement whenever it discloses the portion of the record to which the statement relates.
VI. Student Right to File Complaint

A student has the right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education concerning alleged failures by South University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the governmental office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office United States Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Please see the Appendix  located at the end of this catalog which includes a list of specific contact information by location.

Retention of Student Records

Transcripts and other student records are retained in paper and/or electronic form on each campus. In the event that a campus has changed locations or ceased operations in a geographical area, students should contact the South University central office, 912-201-8134 at the Savannah campus for access to their records.

Military and Veteran Students

Minimum Academic Achievement Standards for Student Receiving Department of Defense Tuition Assistance

In addition to the University’s Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, in order for a Service member student to continue to receive Tuition Assistance (TA) military education benefits for TA-funded courses, the following minimum academic standards must be achieved.

The Department of Defense requires reimbursement from the Service member if a successful course completion is not obtained. For the purpose of reimbursement, a successful course completion is defined as a grade of ”C” or higher for undergraduate courses, a ”B” or higher for graduate courses and a ”Pass” for ”Pass/Fail” grades. Reimbursement will also be required from the Service member if he or she fails to make up a grade of ”I” for incomplete within the time limits stipulated by the educational institution or 6 months after the completion of the class, whichever comes first.

Students using TA must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher after completing 15 semester hours/23 quarter hours, or equivalent, in undergraduate studies, or a GPA of 3.0 or higher after completing 6 semester hours/9 quarter hours, or equivalent, in graduate studies, on a 4.0 grading scale.  If the GPA for TA funded courses falls below these minimum GPA limits, TA will  not be authorized and  Service members will use alternative funding (such as financial aid or personal funds) to enroll in courses to raise  the cumulative GPA to 2.0 for undergraduate studies or 3.0 for graduate studies.

The Secretary of the Military Department will establish recoupment processes with the Service member directly for unsuccessful completion of courses.

Advising Point of Contact

Military students are encouraged to ask about academic support, financial aid advising, disability services or career counseling that is made available on campus. Students in on-campus programs should contact the Financial Aid department for financial aid advising, their Academic Advisor for academic support and the Dean of Student Affairs or the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations for disability services and career counseling. Students in online programs should request information from their Academic Counselor, Student Finance Counselor or Assistant Director of Admissions.

Education Plans for Military Service Members and Veterans

Educational plans will be developed and reviewed with all of our military service members and veteran students by the Registrar’s office.  The educational plan will detail how the student will fulfill all of the requirements to graduate from the educational program as well as the expected timeline of program completion.

A second, updated student educational plan, will be provided to the student within 60 days after full acceptance to the University or after all required academic transcripts are received by the school or the student completes 9 quarter credit hours, whichever is achieved first.

A subsequent educational plan will be provided should the student change programs or if anything changes to the student’s education goals. The plan will be provided to the student within 60 days of the change occurring.

The student is responsible for keeping appointments with his/her academic advisor to review this important information. Educational plans are being provided to new and reentry students who are expected to receive military benefits and who will start courses on or after July 1, 2013. If you are a student receiving military benefits and started classes before July 1, 2013, please contact the Registrar’s office to receive more information or for the development of an education plan.

The student should be cognizant of the length of time it is expected for you to complete the program, as well as the remaining number of months the student may be eligible to receive military education benefits. The student may need to adjust the number of hours you schedule each term or period to assure maximization of your education benefits.

[return to top of page]

Voluntary Intent to Continue

Campus-Based Programs and term-based online programs

Students in Campus-based programs and term-based online programs who are in the first session of the quarter, or students in Accelerated Graduate programs who are in the first or second session of the quarter, and who drop/withdraw or are administratively dropped from all of their courses in that session must have a Voluntary Intent to Continue Form on file in order to not be withdrawn from the University. Students will have 4 business days from their date of determination to submit the Voluntary Intent to Continue Form. Students who do not have a Voluntary Intent to Continue Form on file after the fourth business day and are dropped from all of their courses will be administratively withdrawn from the University.

University Holidays

A South University course may begin, end, or include an official campus holiday. If such a holiday occurs, the class meeting would not occur on that date and course assignments due on that date would shift as follows:

  • The holiday occurs on the first day of the course term: Assignments shift to the following day.
  • The holiday occurs during the course term: Assignments shift to the following day.
  • The holiday occurs on the last day of the course term: Assignments shift to the previous day.

Students in online programs follow the official Savannah campus holiday schedule. Individual on-campus programs may have specific policies as to effect of holidays on class meetings, course assignments, and program requirements.

[return to top of page]

Withdrawal and Drop/Add Policies

Official Withdrawals from the Institution

Official Withdrawals from On-campus Programs

To withdraw officially from the institution, students must contact the office of the registrar to provide notification of their intention to withdraw. New students who withdraw from the institution before the end of the first week of class will have no attempted courses shown on their record.  

Students who officially withdraw or are administratively withdrawn from a course after the Drop/Add period and before day 31 of a 5.5-week, or day 28 of a 5-week course, will receive a W grade. Students who officially withdraw or are administratively withdrawn after day 31 of a 5.5-week course, or day 28 of a 5-week course, will receive a WF grade. Students who officially drop withdraw or are administratively withdrawn from an course after the Drop/Add period and before day 58 of an 11-week class, or day 53 of a 10-week class, will receive a W grade. Students who officially withdraw or are administratively withdrawn after day 58 of an 11-week class, or after day 53 of a 10-week class will receive a WF grade. Students should consult with their Financial Aid Advisor to determine the implications of adding or dropping a course.

Students who withdraw or are administratively withdrawn from all courses in a quarter will be withdrawn from the University.  Students who fail to registrar for a quarter will be withdrawn from the University.

Official Withdrawals from Accelerated Graduate Programs

To withdraw officially from the institution, students must contact the office of the registrar to provide notification of their intention to withdraw. New students who withdraw from the institution before the end of the first week of class will have no attempted courses shown on their record.

Students who officially withdraw or are administratively withdrawn from a course before the end of the 22nd day of class the student will receive a W grade, if a student withdraws or is administratively withdrawn after the 22nd day of the class a WF is assigned.

Official Withdrawal from Online Programs

Students enrolled in term-based or non-term based programs who wish to officially withdraw from the institution must contact their Academic Counselor. New students who officially withdraw from the institution or stop attending in the first 21 days of class will have no attempted courses shown on their record, their enrollment will be cancelled, and all tuition and related fees removed. A non-term student, who is out-of-attendance more than 29 consecutive calendar days, will be administratively withdrawn from the University

Students who officially withdraw or are administratively withdrawn from a course before the 22nd day of a 4 week class, or the 28th day of a 5 week class the student will receive a W grade (if after the 22nd day of a 4 week class, or the 28th day of the 5 week class, a WF grade is assigned). Students who officially withdraw or are administratively withdrawn from a course before the 53rd day of a 10 week class, will receive a W grade (if after the 53rd day in a 10 week course or after the 58th day in an 11 week course, a WF grade is assigned).

Veterans

Veterans in either on-campus or online programs should be aware that the Veterans Administration will not pay for a course that a student drops after the first week of class unless extreme circumstances justify course withdrawal. Veterans should consult their Financial Counselor before withdrawing from any class after the first week of the session. Students who are veterans should also contact the Veterans Administration before withdrawing from school.

Administrative Withdrawals from Non-Term Based Programs

A student who is out-of-attendance more than 29 consecutive calendar days will be administratively withdrawn from the University.

Dropping and Adding a Course

Drop/Add Period (Term-Based Programs)

Campus-based students have only one Drop/Add period each quarter.  Continuing student’s Drop/Add period is the first week of the main quarter start. New and Reentry student’s Drop/Add period is the first week of their quarter or mid-quarter start.  Students in Accelerated Graduate Programs Drop/Add period is the first four (4) days of their quarter or mid-quarter start. Campus-based students may not add an online course that begins later in the quarter after the drop/add period.

Students in Accelerated Graduate Programs Drop/Add period is the first four (4) days of their quarter or mid-quarter start.

Campus-based students may not add an online course to their schedule after day three (3) of the online class.

Students in Online Programs may drop or add a course at the start of each session within their quarter.  Each session within a quarter will have a drop/add period of three calendar days.

Drop/Add period:

  • 4 week course: Days 1, 2 and 3 of the course.
  • 5 week course: Days 1, 2, and 3 of the course.
  • 10 week course: Days 1, 2, and 3 of the course.

For students in online programs, adding a course must be made through their Academic Counselor Students may not be added to a current course after the defined Drop/Add period. However, students may add a course that begins in a future session.

Drop/Add (Term-Based Programs)

Students may adjust their schedules without penalty by dropping and/or adding courses during the Drop/Add period.  Specific dates are reflected on the academic calendar or can be obtained through the Registrar’s office. Students officially withdrawing or administratively withdrawn from a course by the end of the Drop/Add period shall receive a 100% refund of all monies paid for the course and will have that course removed from their academic transcripts.  Students are encouraged to consult the professor and/or department chair before dropping any course.

All schedule revisions must be made through the registrar’s office, where an official Drop/Add Form must be completed. For students in online programs, schedule revisions must be made through their Academic Counselor Students should consult with financial aid to ascertain implications of schedule changes. Courses cannot be added after the late registration period indicated on the University calendar

Drop/Add (Non-Term Programs)

Students who officially drop from a course during the Drop/Add period will have that course removed from their academic transcripts. Students who are officially withdrawing or administratively withdrawn from a course by the end of the Drop/Add period shall receive a 100% refund of all monies paid for the course and  will have that course removed from their academic transcripts.

Drop/Add period:

  • 4 week course: Days 1, 2 and 3 of the course.
  • 5 week course: Days 1, 2, and 3 of the course.
  • 10 week course: Days 1, 2, and 3 of the course.

For students in online programs, adding a course must be made through their Academic Counselor. Students may not be added to a current course after the defined Drop/Add period. However, students may add a course that begins in a future session.

Dropping Courses (Term-Based Programs)

Courses that are dropped after the Drop/Add period but the 22nd day of a 4-week class, or the 28th day of a 5 week class the student will receive a W grade (if after the 22nd, day of a 4-week class, or the 28th day of the 5 week class, or after the 31st day of the 5.5 week class, a WF grade is assigned). Courses that are dropped before the 53rd day of a 10 week class will receive a W grade (if after the 53rd day in a 10 week course a WF grade is assigned).

Dropping Courses (Accelerated Graduate Programs)

Courses that are dropped after the Drop/Add period but before the end of the 22nd day of the class, will result in a grade of “W.”  Courses that are dropped after the Drop/Add period but before the end of the

22nd day of the class will also result in a grade of “W.” Courses dropped after this point will result in the grade of a “WF.”

Dropping Courses (Non-TermBased Programs)

Courses that are dropped after the Drop/Add period but before the 22nd day of a 4-week class, or the 28th day of a 5 week class, or the 31st day of 5.5 week class the student will receive a W grade (if after the 22nd, day of a 4-week class, or the 28th day of the 5 week class, or after the 31st day of the 5.5 week class, a WF grade is assigned). Courses that are dropped before the 53rd day of a 10 week class, or before the 58th day of an 11 week class, will receive a W grade (if after the 53rd day in a 10 week course or after the 58th day in an 11 week course, a WF grade is assigned).

Institutional Review Board (IRB)

The mission of South University’s IRB is to protect the rights and welfare of human participants in research by reviewing all proposed research to be conducted by or with faculty, staff, and/or students of South University.  The IRB will ensure that participants are treated in an ethical manner that is also in compliance with federal regulations and the principles outlined in the Belmont Report.  Oversight of the IRB will be maintained by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs (VCAA).  This role will include coordination and consultation with the College and School Deans.  Direct oversight of the IRB is maintained by the IRB Director of Training and Compliance, Assistant Director of Training and Compliance, and the IRB committee.  According to HHS guidelines, an IRB should contain at least five members who are sensitive to community attitudes and knowledgeable about institutional commitments and regulations and as well as applicable laws and standards of professional conduct. There should be at least one member with a nonscientific concern, at least one member with a scientific concern, and at least one member from the community who is not otherwise affiliated with the institution.  IRB information is available at the inside South University website.  Research applications are submitted to the IRB (irb@southuniversity.edu ) and reviewed at regularly scheduled committee meetings.

Intellectual Property Policy

As a creative community of teachers, artists and scholars, South University is committed to encouraging the creation of new works, new ideas, and new forms of creative and scholarly expression. This Policy on Intellectual Property is provided to protect the interests of those who create as well as the interests of South University itself, which supports this creative and scholarly work.

I. Purpose and Scope

The unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing, may subject students and individuals to civil and criminal liabilities.  Almost all of the music, movies, television shows, software, games and images found on the Internet are protected by federal copyright law.  The owner of the copyright in these works has the right to control their distribution, modification, reproduction, public display and public performance.  It is therefore generally illegal to use file sharing networks to download and share copyrighted works without the copyright owner’s permission unless “fair use” or another exemption under copyright law applies.

Fair use under the federal Copyright Act allows the use without permission of copyrighted material for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting or teaching under certain limited circumstances.  There is no blanket exception from liability for students or employees of educational university, however, and whether the use of copyrighted material without permission falls with “fair use” or one of the other exceptions in the Act depends on a very detailed, case-by-case analysis of various factors.  Students should be aware that sharing music, videos, software and other copyrighted materials is very likely not to be considered a “fair use” and therefore may be a violation of the law.  A violation of South University’s policy for use of its information technology system can result in termination of network access for the student and/or other disciplinary action including removal of the student from South University.

Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws

Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement. Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. For more information, please see the website of the U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov.

South University’s policies in regard to copyright infringement via the Internet prohibit the illegal downloading or unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials using South University’s information technology system.  South University’s policies prohibit use of South University’s computer network to engage in illegal copying or distribution of copyrighted works such as by unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing (i.e., the sharing of copyrighted works, typically in digital or electronic files) without permission.

As a creative community of teachers, artists and scholars, South University is committed to encouraging the creation of new works, new ideas, and new forms of creative and scholarly expression. This Policy on Intellectual Property is provided to protect the interests of those who create as well as the interests of South University itself, which supports this creative and scholarly work.

This document expresses South University’s policy regarding ownership and usage rights with respect to Intellectual Property (as hereinafter defined). It covers all those who are a part of South University - faculty, staff, students, visiting artists, visiting scholars, or other participants enrolled, employed or affiliated with South University, and this Policy governs in all circumstances, unless South University has modified it through a written agreement connected to a sponsored or commissioned work or as part of work under a grant or contract. Should there be any conflict between the provisions of this Policy and the terms of a separate written agreement between South University and any party, the terms of that separate written agreement will govern.  This Policy is not intended to limit “fair use” as defined by U.S. laws.

II. Definitions (if applicable)

The following terms are used throughout the Policy and are defined as follows:

  1. Copyright - Copyright is the intangible property right granted for a limited period of time by federal statute (Title 17 of the U.S. Code) for an original work of authorship fixed in any tangible form of expression. Copyright provides the owner with five exclusive rights, including the exclusive right to reproduce the work, to prepare derivative works based on the work, to distribute copies of the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership (or by rental, lease, license or lending), to display the work publicly and to perform the work publicly (if relevant).
  2. Commissioned Work - A Commissioned Work is defined as a Work (as defined in paragraph K) that is produced or created pursuant to a written agreement with the Institution and for Institution purposes by (a) individuals not under the employ of the Institution or (b) Institutional Employees (as defined in paragraph D) acting outside the scope of their regular Institution employment, as determined by their existing Institution employment arrangement or contract.
  3. Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity - Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity is defined as the inquiry, investigation, research, or creative activity that is carried out by faculty, staff and Students of the Institution working on their own, that advances knowledge or the development of the arts, sciences, humanities, or technology where the specific direction, methodology, and content of the pursuit is determined by the faculty, staff member(s), or Student(s) without the direct assignment, supervision, or involvement of the Institution.
  4. Institutional Employee - An Institutional Employee is a full-time or part-time faculty member, visiting faculty, adjunct faculty, artist, scholar, or fellow (as defined in the Faculty Handbook), or a full-time or part-time staff member (as defined in the Staff Handbook), or Student, who is employed by the Institution or who is working under an Institution contract, either expressed or implied.
  5. Intellectual Property - Means: (i) trademarks, service marks, brand names, trade dress, assumed names, trade names, slogans, URLs, domain names, logos and other indications of source, sponsorship or affiliation, together with all associated goodwill (whether the foregoing are registered, unregistered or the subject of a pending application for registration); (ii) inventions, developments, improvements, discoveries, know how, concepts and ideas, whether patentable or not, in any jurisdiction; (iii) patents, patent applications and patent disclosures; (iv) trade secrets and proprietary or confidential information; (v) writings and other works of authorship, whether subject to copyright protection or not, in any jurisdiction, including but not limited to literary works (such as books, scholarly articles, journal articles and other articles, theses, research, course syllabi, curricula, exams, instructional and evaluation materials for classes, courses, labs or seminars, study guides, student rosters and attendance forms, grade reports, assessment of student work and projects, course or program proposals, software, data and databases, lecture and presentation materials); musical works (including any accompanying words); dramatic works (including any accompanying music); pantomimes and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculpture works (including graphic designs; illustrations, photographs, paintings, sculptures and other works of art); motion pictures and other audiovisual works (including films, audio and video recordings and multimedia projects); sound recordings; architectural works; and compilations; and (vi) copyrights, copyright registrations and applications for registration of copyrights in any jurisdiction.
  6. Patent - A United States patent is a grant which gives the owner of the patent the right to exclude all others from making, using, or selling the claimed invention in the United States for a set period of time. Similar rights are granted in other countries, but the discussion of Patents in this Policy will focus specifically on United States patent rights.
  7. Sponsored Work - Sponsored Work is a Work (as defined in paragraph K) that is produced or created under an agreement between the Institution and a sponsor which provides the Institution with ownership and/or usage rights to the Work and Intellectual Property produced under the agreement. Sponsored works do not include works created through independent academic effort or creative activity, even when based on the findings of the sponsored project, so long as an agreement does not state otherwise.
  8. Student - A Student is a regularly registered, full- or part-time, undergraduate or graduate at the Institution, including students attending the Institution as “special status students”: e.g., as participants in Professional Institute for Educators (PIE), Continuing Education (CE), the Pre-College or Saturday programs, or in exchange programs or through special grants or fellowships.
  9. Substantial Institutional Resources - Any substantial use of Institution equipment, facilities, time, personnel, or funds, and use of Institution resources that are not “commonly provided”, is considered a use of “Substantial Institutional Resources.” This use does not include resources commonly provided to Institution faculty and staff, such as offices, library facilities, basic artistic facilities, and everyday telephone, computer, and computer network support. However, substantial time spent in the use of these latter resources may constitute the use of “Substantial Institutional Resources.” Resources not considered “commonly provided” include specially procured equipment or space, additional staffing or personnel, utilization beyond normal work hours of Institution personnel, and monetary expenditures that require a budget. Faculty may use the basic artistic facilities unless use infringes on student use of those facilities for coursework.
  10. Trademark and Service Mark - A trademark or service mark is any word, phrase, name, symbol, logo, slogan, device, or any combination thereof that is used in trade to identify and distinguish one party’s goods or services from those of others.
  11. Work - The term “Work” as used in this Policy shall be defined to include all of the items identified in Sections (i), (ii), (iv) and (v) of the definition of Intellectual Property in paragraph E.
  12. Work Made for Hire - A “Work Made for Hire” is defined as a Work (as defined in paragraph K) prepared by an employee within the scope of his or her employment.

Consistent with the Copyright Act of 1976, as amended, a Work Made for Hire under this Policy also includes a work specially ordered or commissioned for use as a contribution to a collective work, as a part of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, as a translation, as a supplementary work, as a compilation, as an instructional text, as a test, as answer material for a test, or as an atlas, if the parties expressly agree in a written instrument signed by them that the work shall be considered a work made for hire. 

Examples of works made for hire include software programs created within the scope of an employee’s duties by a staff programmer, a newspaper article written by a staff journalist for the newspaper that employs him/her, and a musical arrangement or ditty written for a music company by a salaried arranger on its staff.

III. Policy Provisions

The Rights of the Creator of Intellectual Property  

A.  Faculty, Staff and Student Works

  1. General Rule

Subject to the exceptions noted in this Policy, as a general rule, South University does not claim ownership of Intellectual Property developed through Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity and that is intended to disseminate the results of academic research and scholarship, and/or to exhibit forms of artistic expression on the part of faculty, staff, and Students.

  1. Exceptions to the General Rule.

Exceptions to the general rule set forth in III.A.1 above include Intellectual Property developed by faculty, staff, Students and Institutional Employees under any of the following circumstances:

  1. The Intellectual Property is developed as a Sponsored Work.
  2. The Intellectual Property is developed as a Commissioned Work.
  3. The Intellectual Property is developed using Substantial Institutional Resources.
  4. The Intellectual Property is developed by the creator within the scope of his or her employment with South University and constitutes a Work Made for Hire.
  5. The Intellectual Property is developed by a creator who is assigned, directed or funded by South University to create the Intellectual Property.
  6. The Intellectual Property is developed under a grant, program or agreement which provides South University with ownership rights, in whole or in part, to the Intellectual Property.

Under the circumstances described in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f) above, the Intellectual Property shall be owned by South University (or by South University and any other party as specified in any written grant, program or agreement).

The creator of any Intellectual Property that is or might be owned by South University under this Policy is required to make reasonable prompt written disclosure of the Work to an officer designated by South University’s Chancellor, and to execute any document deemed necessary by South University to perfect legal rights in South University and enable South University to file applications for registration when desired.

  1. Ownership Rights in Specific Types of Works.

For purposes of clarification and without limiting the general rule and exceptions set forth in Sections III.A.1 and 2 above, ownership rights in the following types of Works are allocated as set forth below:

  1. Curricular materials including course outlines, curricula, lesson plans, course handouts, PowerPoint and other presentation materials (in all forms and media), course content and syllabi are deemed to be Works Made for Hire and therefore all Intellectual Property associated therewith is owned by South University. Likewise, student rosters, attendance forms, interim grade reports, and assessments of student projects, including all Intellectual Property associated therewith, belong solely to South University.
  2. Unless developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f), or a written agreement provides otherwise, scholarly articles and papers written for publication in journals, presentations and scholarly papers prepared for seminars and conferences, and personal lecture or teaching notes are typically not considered to be owned by South University as Works Made for Hire or otherwise.
  3. If any Intellectual Property to be owned by South University under Section III.A.2 (a) through (f) above is developed jointly with a non-Institution party, the parties respective ownership and usage rights in the resulting Intellectual Property shall be set forth in a written agreement.
  4. Where Intellectual Property is to be developed using Substantial Institutional Resources, authorized representatives of South University will develop a written agreement with the user of those resources, which must be executed by the parties before use of the resources, to identify the nature and terms of the use, including possible reimbursements or other systems of compensation back to South University.
  5. Unless a Work is developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f), or a written agreement provides otherwise, all Intellectual Property created by faculty during sabbatical are owned by the faculty.
  6. Unless the Work is developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f), or a written agreement provides otherwise, Intellectual Property created by a Student working on his or her own, or developed in the context of a course, is owned by the Student and South University will not use the Student’s Work without the Student’s permission to do so.
  7. Students working on a project governed by an existing written agreement to which South University is a party are bound by all terms of that agreement.
  8. Students hired to carry out specific tasks that contribute to Intellectual Property of South University retain no rights of ownership in whole or in part to that Intellectual Property or to the Student’s contribution to that work.
  9. Students who wish to work collaboratively with Institutional Employees on projects which involve the creation of Works and Intellectual Property are required to sign and deliver an acceptable written agreement to South University outlining their rights before commencing work on such projects. Either party has the right to initiate such agreement.
  10. The rights of South University to a perpetual, worldwide license (exclusive or nonexclusive, as South University deems necessary), to use and reproduce copyrighted materials for educational, research, and promotional purposes must be included in any agreement with a non- Institution sponsor. 

B.  Independent Contractor Works

As a general rule, South University will own Intellectual Property created by an independent contractor if a written agreement signed by the parties so provides, or South University has specially ordered or commissioned the work and such work is designated as a Work Made for Hire in a signed written agreement between the parties. If South University does not own the Intellectual Property created by an independent contractor, it shall have a right or license to use any Work produced by the independent contractor in the course of performance of the contract, in accordance with the parties’ agreement.

IV. Institution’s Usage Rights

To the extent that faculty, staff or Institutional Employees retain ownership of Work and Intellectual Property according to this Policy, South University shall have a permanent, non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty free right and license to make educational use of such Work and Intellectual Property, including the right to use, reproduce, distribute, display, perform and modify (i.e. create derivative works) such Work and Intellectual Property in all forms and media now  known or hereafter existing in connection with its curriculum, courses of instruction and educational programs, and any related accreditation or promotion of South University .  Where practicable, South University will use best efforts to cite the creator of the Work if South University exercises such usage rights.

V. Institution’s Marks

Intellectual Property comprised of or associated with South University ‘s Trademarks and Service Marks, including but not limited to its name, logos, slogans, insignia, and other symbols of identity (collectively the “Marks”) belongs exclusively to South University  and/or its affiliates.  This Policy is designed to protect the reputation of South University and its affiliates, and to prevent the illegal or unapproved use of South University’s Marks.

No Institution Mark may be used without the prior, written authorization of the appropriate authorities of South University. However, faculty, staff, and Students may identify their status or professional affiliation with South University as appropriate, but any use of South University’s Marks in this regard must avoid any confusing, misleading or false impression of affiliation with, or sponsorship or endorsement by, South University.  No products or services may be marked, offered, sold, promoted or distributed with or under South University’s Marks without South University’s prior written permission and compliance with the licensing policies of South University.  All requests for use of Institution Marks must be submitted in writing to an officer designated by the President. The designated Institution officer retains information concerning what marks, names, logos, symbols, insignias, and related words, phrases, and images currently comprise South University’s Marks.

VI. Substantial Use of Institution Resources

Although “Substantial Institutional Resources” is defined (see Section II. Terminology), it is acknowledged that such resources and their use may change over time, with changes in technology, physical infrastructure of South University, modes of employment, etc. Therefore, this Policy allows the Academic Policy Advisory Committee to review the definition of “substantial use” from time to time and implement any changes or clarification to the definitions which South University deems necessary in order to establish an appropriate standard.

VII. Review Scheme

Questions concerning this Intellectual Property Policy should be addressed to the Dean of Academic Affairs and Operations on South University campuses and the Assistant Vice Chancellor of Online Academic Operations for Online. 

VIII. Reservation of Rights

South University reserves the right at any time in its sole discretion to modify and/or make changes to the Policy as advisable or appropriate. South University agrees, however, that it will endeavor to notify the entire Institution community through both print and electronic means of its intention to make modifications and/or changes to the Policy at least 30 working days before their enactment.

IX. Effective Date

This Policy supersedes any preexisting Intellectual Property policy of South University and will remain in effect until modified or revoked by South University. This Policy will be binding on all parties who create Intellectual Property after the effective date, and this Policy and other agreements that represent modifications to this Policy shall remain binding on such creators even after their relationship with South University changes or terminates.

X. Governing Law

This Policy shall be governed by and interpreted under applicable federal laws pertaining to intellectual property and applicable state law, without regard to choice of law provisions.